An Investigation of Two Stress-Management Techniques in a Field Setting

Click name to view affiliation

Ian W. Maynard Bishop Otter College

Search for other papers by Ian W. Maynard in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
Peter C.J. Cotton Bishop Otter College

Search for other papers by Peter C.J. Cotton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

The aim of this study was to investigate Martens, Burton, Vealey, Bump, and Smith’s (1990) contention that stress-management techniques should be matched to the symptoms manifested by performers. Subjects, 20 male collegiate field hockey players, responded to the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) on four occasions prior to an important hockey match. Subjects were then placed in two intervention groups: applied relaxation (somatic anxiety; n = 6) and positive thought control (cognitive anxiety; n = 8). Six additional subjects formed the control group. Subjects completed a 12-week intervention in a field setting. Results suggested that reducing anxiety with a method directed at the performer’s dominant anxiety type is more efficacious. A secondary aim was to further investigate the anxiety-performance relationship using an intraindividual performance measure. Somatic anxiety was found to account for 22% of the variance in field hockey performance. Polynomial trend analyses failed to produce significant relationships between the CSAI-2 subscales and performance.

Ian W. Maynard and Peter C.J. Cotton are with the West Sussex Institute of Higher Education at Bishop Otter College, College Lane, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 4PE U.K.

  • Collapse
  • Expand
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 6532 1210 164
Full Text Views 355 69 2
PDF Downloads 366 82 3