Felt Arousal, Thoughts/Feelings, and Ski Performance

in The Sport Psychologist
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This study examined the relationship between felt arousal, thoughts/feelings, and ski performance based on recent arousal and affect conceptualizations. An eclectic integration of these perspectives suggests that to understand the arousal-performance relationship, researchers need to examine not only a felt arousal continuum (i.e., intensity or level ranging from low to high), but also a concomitant thoughts and feelings continuum (i.e., ranging from positive to negative). Recreational slalom ski racers completed a self-report measure examining felt arousal and thoughts/feelings prior to several ski runs. Results demonstrated a significant relationship between felt arousal level, thoughts/feelings, and subjective ski performance ratings, but not for actual ski times. In contrast to the inverted-U hypothesis for subjective performance ratings, high felt arousal is not associated with poor performance ratings if it is accompanied by positive thoughts and feelings.

Thomas D. Raedeke is with the Department of Exercise and Movement Science at the University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403. Gary L. Stein is with Michael Leeds & Associates, 2335 Alder St., Eugene, OR 97405.

The Sport Psychologist
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