Role Conflict and Burnout among Elite Israeli Female Athletes Engaged in “Feminine” and “Non-Feminine” Sports

in Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal
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Ninety female athletes at the international and/or national level, engaged in sports that are either “feminine” (n=49) or “non-feminine” (n=41), participated in this study. We predicted (a) a positive relation between role conflict and burnout; and (b) higher role conflict and burnout among athletes from “non-feminine” sports. Questionnaire results revealed a positive relation between role conflict and burnout, albeit only in “feminine” sports. Role conflict was not higher among athletes from “non-feminine” sports. Burnout was somewhat lower among “non-feminine”-sports athletes. “Feminine”-sports athletes were significantly younger, had more training, and felt more restricted by their athletic activity, in comparison to “non-feminine”-sports athletes. Results are interpreted in terms of current theoretical perspectives, such as the “expansionist” approach.

Professor Michael Bar-Eli Director, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Management Ribstein Center for Sport Medicine Sciences and Research Wingate Institute Netanya 42902, Israel Email: dinao@wingate.org.il