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Caffeine, but Not Creatine, Improves Anaerobic Power Without Altering Anaerobic Capacity in Healthy Men During a Wingate Anaerobic Test

Alisson Henrique Marinho, Marcos David Silva-Cavalcante, Gislaine Cristina-Souza, Filipe Antonio de Barros Sousa, Thays Ataide-Silva, Romulo Bertuzzi, Gustavo Gomes de Araujo, and Adriano Eduardo Lima-Silva

There is a lack of evidence on the additional benefits of combining caffeine (CAF) and creatine (CRE) supplementation on anaerobic power and capacity. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the effects of combined and isolated supplementation of CAF and CRE on anaerobic power and capacity. Twenty-four healthy men performed a baseline Wingate anaerobic test and were then allocated into a CRE (n = 12) or placebo (PLA; n = 12) group. The CRE group ingested 20 g/day of CRE for 8 days, while the PLA group ingested 20 g/day of maltodextrin for the same period. On the sixth and eighth days of the loading period, both groups performed a Wingate anaerobic test 1 hr after either CAF (5 mg/kg of body mass; CRE + CAF and PLA + CAF conditions) or PLA (5 mg/kg of body mass of cellulose; CRE + PLA and PLA + PLA conditions) ingestion. After the loading period, changes in body mass were greater (p < .05) in the CRE (+0.87 ± 0.23 kg) than in the PLA group (+0.13 ± 0.27 kg). In both groups, peak power was higher (p = .01) in the CAF (1,033.4 ± 209.3 W) than in the PLA trial (1,003.3 ± 204.4 W), but mean power was not different between PLA and CAF trials (p > .05). In conclusion, CAF, but not CRE ingestion, increases anaerobic power. Conversely, neither CRE nor CAF has an effect on anaerobic capacity.

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Trehalose Improved 20-min Cycling Time-Trial Performance After 100-min Cycling in Amateur Cyclists

Nathan Gobbi de Oliveira, Luana Farias de Oliveira, Rafael Pires da Silva, Tamires Nunes Oliveira, Gabriella Berwig Möller, Juliana Murasaki, Manoel Antônio Ramires, Rafael de Almeida Azevedo, Guilherme Giannini Artioli, Hamilton Roschel, Bruno Gualano, and Bryan Saunders

Carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation during endurance exercise can improve performance. However, it is unclear whether low glycemic index (GI) CHO leads to differential ergogenic and metabolic effects compared with a standard high GI CHO. This study investigated the ergogenic and metabolic effects of CHO supplementation with distinct GIs, namely, (a) trehalose (30 g/hr), (b) isomaltulose (30 g/hr), (c) maltodextrin (60 g/hr), and (d) placebo (water). In this double-blind, crossover, counterbalanced, placebo-controlled study, 13 male cyclists cycled a total of 100 min at varied exercise intensity (i.e., 10-min stages at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg; repeated three times plus two 5-min stages at 1.0 W/kg before and after the protocol), followed by a 20-min time trial on four separated occasions. Blood glucose and lactate (every 20 min), heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion were collected throughout, and muscle biopsies were taken before and immediately after exercise. The results showed that trehalose improved time-trial performance compared with placebo (total work done 302 ± 39 vs. 287 ± 48 kJ; p = .01), with no other differences between sessions (all p ≥ .07). Throughout the 100-min protocol, blood glucose was higher with maltodextrin compared with the other supplements at all time points (all p < .05). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, muscle glycogen content, blood glucose, and lactate were not different between conditions when considering the 20-min time trial (all p > .05). Trehalose supplementation throughout endurance exercise improved cycling performance and appears to be an appropriate CHO source for exercise tasks up to 2 hr. No ergogenic superiority between the different types of CHO was established.

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Volume 34 (2024): Issue 2 (Mar 2024)

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Cold Ambient Temperature Does Not Alter Subcutaneous Abdominal Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Blood Flow in Endurance-Trained Cyclists

Christopher W. Bach, Patrick G. Saracino, Daniel A. Baur, Brandon D. Willingham, Brent C. Ruby, and Michael J. Ormsbee

This study sought to investigate the effect of cold ambient temperature on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) lipolysis and blood flow during steady-state endurance exercise in endurance-trained cyclists. Ten males (age: 23 ± 3 years; peak oxygen consumption: 60.60 ± 4.84 ml·kg−1·min−1; body fat: 18.4% ± 3.5%) participated in baseline lactate threshold (LT) and peak oxygen consumption testing, two familiarization trials, and two experimental trials. Experimental trials consisted of cycling in COLD (3 °C; 42% relative humidity) and neutral (NEU; 19 °C; 39% relative humidity) temperatures. Exercise consisted of 25 min cycling at 70% LT and 25 min at 90% LT. In situ SCAAT lipolysis and blood flow were measured via microdialysis. Heart rate, core temperature, carbohydrate and fat oxidation, blood glucose, and blood lactate were also measured. Heart rate, core temperature, oxygen consumption, and blood lactate increased with exercise but were not different between COLD and NEU. SCAAT blood flow did not change from rest to exercise or between COLD and NEU. Interstitial glycerol increased during exercise (p < .001) with no difference between COLD and NEU. Fat oxidation increased (p < .001) at the onset of exercise and remained elevated thereafter with no difference between COLD and NEU. Carbohydrate oxidation increased with increasing exercise intensity and was greater at 70% LT in COLD compared to NEU (p = .030). No differences were observed between conditions for any other variable. Cycling exercise increased SCAAT lipolysis but not blood flow. Ambient temperature did not alter SCAAT metabolism, SCAAT blood flow, or fat oxidation in well-trained cyclists, though cold exposure increased whole-body carbohydrate oxidation at lower exercise intensities.

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Volume 34 (2024): Issue S1 (Feb 2024)

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Abstracts From the 2023 International Sport + Exercise Nutrition Conference

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Energy Expenditure of Elite Male and Female Professional Tennis Players During Habitual Training

Daniel G. Ellis, James P. Morton, Graeme L. Close, and Tim F. Donovan

Understanding the daily energy expenditure of athletes during training is important to support recovery, adaptation, and the maintenance of performance. The aim of the current research was to assess the total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and the acute energy expenditure (EE) of tennis training sessions during habitual training of elite tennis players. Using a cohort study design, 27 (n = 10, male; age; 22.3 ± 3.2 years and n = 17, female; age: 23.8 ± 3.5 years) elite singles tennis players were assessed for TDEE and tennis training EE. Using Actiheart activity monitors during a 2- to 5-day training period, male players were analyzed for 26 days and 33 (1.3 ± 0.5 sessions/day) tennis training sessions, and female players for 43 days and 58 (1.2 ± 0.4 sessions/day) tennis training sessions. Male TDEE (4,708 ± 583 kcal/day) was significantly higher than female (3,639 ± 305 kcal/day). Male absolute and relative tennis training EEs (10.2 ± 2.3 kcal/min and 7.9 ± 1.4 kcal·hr−1·kg−1) were significantly higher than those of females (7.6 ± 1.0 kcal/min and 6.8 ± 0.9 kcal·hr−1·kg−1). The resting metabolic rate was assessed via indirect calorimetry. The physical activity level for both groups was 2.3 AU. The TDEE of male and female players during habitual training now highlights the continual cycle of high energy demands experienced by the elite tennis player. The broad ranges of TDEE and EE reported here suggest individual assessment and nutritional planning be prioritized, with a particular focus on carbohydrate requirements.

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Caffeine Does Not Alter Performance, Perceptual Responses, and Oxidative Stress After Short Sprint Interval Training

Mauro F. Bernardo, Alysson Enes, Elisangela F. Rezende, Alexandre R. Okuyama, Ragami C. Alves, Murilo de Andrade, Ana Carolina G. Macedo, Marcelo Paes de Barros, Darren G. Candow, Scott C. Forbes, and Tácito P. Souza-Junior

Despite the abundance of research investigating the efficacy of caffeine supplementation on exercise performance, the physiological and biochemical responses to caffeine supplementation during intermittent activities are less evident. This study investigated the acute effects of caffeine supplementation on measures of exercise performance, ratings of perceived exertion, and biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by an acute bout of sprint interval training. In a randomized crossover design, 12 healthy males (age: 26 ± 4 years, height: 177.5 ± 6 cm, body mass: 80.7 ± 7.6 kg) ingested 6 mg/kg of caffeine or placebo 60 min prior to performing sprint interval training (12 × 6 s “all-out sprints” interspersed by 60 s of rest). Performance scores and ratings of perceived exertion were assessed after every sprint. Blood samples were collected before supplementation, prior to and following each sprint, and 5 and 60 min after the last sprint. Caffeine had no effect on any performance measures, ratings of perceived exertion, or biomarkers of oxidative stress (p > .05). In conclusion, caffeine supplementation does not improve performance or decrease oxidative stress after an acute bout of sprint interval training.

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Timing of Caffeine Ingestion Does Not Improve Three-Point Shooting Accuracy in College Basketball Players

Zhi Sen Tan, Rachelle Yahn Yee Sim, Masato Kawabata, Dorrain Yanwen Low, Yulan Wang, and Stephen F. Burns

This study investigated the effects of the timing of caffeine (3 mg/kg body mass) ingestion on three-point shooting accuracy and other performance parameters during a basketball exercise simulation test (BEST). Eighteen college basketball players (mean ± SD: age = 24.4 ± 1.5 years, height = 181.7 ± 9.5 cm, body mass = 80.9 ± 13.2 kg) underwent one familiarization trial and three main conditions in a randomized order: (a) placebo (maltodextrin) and placebo, (b) caffeine and placebo, and (c) placebo and caffeine. Participants ingested either the placebo or caffeine pill 75 and 15 min before performing four quarters of the BEST and a three-point shooting protocol. During each quarter, participants completed 16 rounds of the BEST and ten three-point shots. Vertical jump height, 6 m sprint timing, BEST completion timing, three-point shooting accuracy, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, blood glucose, blood lactate, and psychological measures pertaining to performance were measured. The BEST completion timing differed among conditions (placebo and placebo = 26.4 ± 2.0 s, caffeine and placebo = 25.8 ± 2.0 s, placebo and caffeine = 25.9 ± 2.1 s; p = .031) but not three-point shooting accuracy (placebo and placebo = 12.33 ± 4.10; caffeine and placebo = 12.61 ± 2.81; placebo and caffeine = 11.67 ± 3.77; p = .648), vertical jump height, or sprint times. Manipulating ingestion timing of caffeine did not improve three-point shooting accuracy, vertical jump height, or 6 m sprint timings, but caffeine can improve performance times during simulated basketball exercise irrespective of ingestion timing.

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Acute Beetroot Juice Supplementation Has No Effect on Upper- and Lower-Body Maximal Isokinetic Strength and Muscular Endurance in International-Level Male Gymnasts

Ozcan Esen, Joseph Fox, Raci Karayigit, and Ian Walshe

Nitrate ( NO 3 ) has properties that can improve muscle function, leading to improvements in metabolic cost of exercise as well as enhance force production. Gymnastics is a whole-body sport, involving events that demand a high level of strength and fatigue resistance. However, the effect of NO 3 supplementation on both upper- and lower-body function in gymnasts is unknown. This study examined the effect of acute beetroot juice (BRJ) supplementation on isokinetic strength and endurance of the upper- and lower-body in highly trained international-level male gymnasts. In a double-blind, randomized crossover design, 10 international-level male gymnasts completed two acute supplementation periods, consuming either 2 × 70 ml NO 3 -rich (∼12.8 mmol/L of NO 3 ) or NO 3 -depleted (PLA) BRJ. Maximal strength of the upper-leg and upper-arm at 60°/s, 120°/s, 180°/s, and 300°/s, and muscular endurance (50 repeated isokinetic contractions at 180°/s) were assessed. Plasma NO 3 (BRJ: 663 ± 164 μM, PLA: 89 ± 48 μM) and nitrite ( NO 2 ) concentrations (BRJ: 410 ± 137 nmol/L, PLA: 125 ± 36 nmol/L) were elevated following BRJ compared to PLA (both p < .001). Maximal strength of knee and elbow extensors and flexors did not differ between supplements (p > .05 for all velocities). Similarly, fatigue index of knee and elbow extension and flexion was not different between supplements (all p > .05). Acute BRJ supplementation, containing ∼12.8 mmol/L of NO 3 , increased plasma NO 3 and NO 2 concentrations, but did not enhance isokinetic strength or fatigue resistance of either upper or lower extremities in international-level male gymnasts.