Browse

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 207 items for :

  • Sport Management Education Journal x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Framing Course Content on Diversity and Inclusion: Varying Outcomes From Teaching on Disability in Sport Management

Molly Hayes Sauder and Jaime R. DeLuca

Diversity and inclusion are identified as necessary for enhancing the sport industry. Undergraduate sport management programs play an important role in educating aspiring sport professionals with respect to these topics. However, the literature indicates that sport management education can improve with respect to this work. Therefore, the purpose of this instructional technique review is to discuss two comparable teaching activities that sought to incorporate diversity and inclusion education into the content area of disability and sport-related compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Student feedback showed that despite similarities between the activities (i.e., active engagement with the Americans with Disabilities Act as it pertains to sport facilities), students had substantially different reported learning outcomes related to diversity and inclusion. This review is thus designed to illustrate the importance of deliberate framing decisions in the sport management classroom, which can have a transformative impact on students’ learning around diversity and inclusion content.

Restricted access

Historically Black College and University Faculty’s Perception of Commission on Sport Management Accreditation and Perceived Barriers

Rennae Williams Stowe and Charles Crowley

Program-level accreditation ensures that students will be equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in a career that is based on industry standards. Numerous researchers have reported the cost and benefits of pursuing specialized accreditation in different disciplines. There is a dearth of research related to specialized accreditation at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in general and none specifically for sport management accreditation. Therefore, this study aims to fill the void of research on the perception of the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA) by faculty and administrators at HBCUs. The researchers were given permission to utilize an existing survey. Results of this study found that the top benefits of accreditation were accountability for program improvements and recognition as a superior (elite) program/institution. Cost and redundancy were reported as major barriers to COSMA. Although HBCUs must deal with fewer resources and a lower budget than most predominantly White institutions (PWI), they are evaluated using the same accreditation standards as PWIs. Therefore, if HBCU sport management programs are going to seek accreditation with COSMA, they must be understood within the context in which they are operating—and how that may be different from PWIs.

Restricted access

Curriculum Representation in Programs Accredited by COSMA

Jennifer VanSickle, Katharine A. Burakowski, and Emily Dane-Staples

The curricular content of sport management degrees has been scrutinized and criticized by internal and external stakeholders. Before specialized accreditation, individual institutions decided the content of their degrees. Accreditation established a baseline of curricular content known as the Common Professional Component. To add to the body of literature on undergraduate sport management curricular development, this study analyzed the content of accredited sport management programs and the impact of institutional forces on that content. Despite institutional differences, results show consistency across the curricula of accredited programs, with experiential learning, management concepts, and sport marketing appearing most frequently.

Restricted access

Women and Members of Socially Diverse Groups in a Sport Management Program: Key Lessons From Creating and Leading a Student-Led Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Club

Sullivan Murphy, Dawn E. Trussell, Mackayla Petrie, Brooklyn Groves, and Shannon Kerwin

This manuscript shares insights on the process of creating and operating a student-led equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) club centered in a sport management program through five reflective stories (i.e., three students and two faculty members). Sport Helps Everyone Make Allies is a student-led EDI club created at one of the largest sport-management-specific degree programs in North America. Based on critical reflections from the five stories, we identify key lessons for the creation and management of student-led EDI clubs: (a) resisting the chilly climate, (b) EDI initiatives within hierarchal systems, (c) EDI initiatives and the challenges of performative allyship, (d) EDI initiatives as agents of change, and (e) the essential role of faculty. By sharing our insights and reflections, we hope to help future social-justice-focused student groups navigate the development of a student-led EDI club.

Restricted access

Career Authoring in Sport Management: A Four-Step Assignment for Career Development

Dominique C. Kropp, Sarah E. Tackett, and Christopher M. Brown

Restricted access

Top-Ranked Higher Education Institutions: An Investigation of the Sport Management Academic Discipline

Kurt C. Mayer, Alan L. Morse, and Yash Padhye

The current exploratory study determined the prevalence of the sport management academic degree being offered in top-ranked institutions as based on U.S. News & World Report rankings. A focus on the differences of bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees being offered, or not offered, was placed on national universities and liberal arts colleges because of the prevalence of these institution types and their educational settings. Additionally, the study aimed to determine if relevant indicators predicted a sport management degree being offered at a top-ranked national university and liberal arts college. Results indicated significant differences, with sport management degrees being offered at a higher frequency in national universities than liberal arts colleges. However, the sport management degree was largely not offered by the majority of top-ranked institutions. Notably, ranking, enrollment, and public/private institutional status did not predict sport management degree offerings at a liberal arts college. However, a national university had an increased likelihood of offering a sport management degree as enrollment increased and ranking increased (i.e., moved closer to 150). Altogether, the project highlighted that while the sport management academic discipline has certainly grown since its inception, growth has not really occurred at top-ranked higher education institutions, especially liberal arts colleges.

Restricted access

Longitudinal Analysis of Stakeholder Attitudes Toward External Review of Sport Management Master’s Degree Programs

Emily Dane-Staples and Katharine A. Burakowski

The trio of assessment, accreditation, and accountability is at the forefront of higher education today. National organizations serving specific disciplines often establish curricular elements, review degree programs, and provide external accountability of program quality. Sport management has had two external review options in its history, yet few studies have addressed stakeholder attitudes toward these options. Using longitudinal data, this study explored attitudes and familiarity of external review and the impact that formalized accreditation has had on sport management master’s programs. Reasons for seeking or refraining from external review remained consistent, as did familiarity with external-review standards. Results suggested a general satisfaction with the evolution from the Sport Management Program Review Council to the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA).

Restricted access

Archival Research in Sport Management: A Review for Research Methods Courses

Tiffany Demiris and Chad Seifried

The present study aimed to explain archival research and demonstrate its relevance as a distinct research method to include in sport management research methods course instruction. The current essay implicitly shows how archival research can complement other research methods and possibly improve upon their limitations. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that training in archival research can offer skills to students who might pursue employment in the sport industry. The review outlines what archival research is. Next, the various limitations and considerations to aid course instructors and subsequently researcher or practitioner comprehension are provided. Finally, the paper offers a guide for approaching physical archives and outlines expectations for archival research. Techniques necessary for analyzing information gleaned from archival research are presented and explained along with sample course assignments that are available to not only research methods classes but also potentially other coursework.

Restricted access

Journaling as Contemplative Practice for Sport Management Education

Samuel M. Clevenger and Jaime R. DeLuca

Journaling assignments are generative practices for the sport management classroom because they can help students process course content through self-reflection and relate their acquired knowledge to their experiences and worldviews. This essay presents journaling as an example of contemplative pedagogy, an educational technique that supports the development of skills in mindful self-awareness, as well as the translation of course content to practical knowledge through calm and creative expression. The essay outlines the practical implementation of contemplative journaling in undergraduate courses and contends that it is a useful pedagogical tool for the sport management classroom, particularly in helping students engage with topics concerning social justice and inequalities in the industry.

Free access

Digital Development and Technology in Sport: A Course to Improve Digital Literacy in the Sport Management Curriculum

Nicholas Swim, Regina Presley, and Erica Thompson