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Digest

Jeff Caron, Alyson Crozier, Alison Ede, Matt Hoffman, Seungmin Lee, Sascha Leisterer, Sean Locke, Desi McEwan, Kathleen Mellano, Eva Pila, and Matthew Stork

Edited by Kim Gammage

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Volume 45 (2023): Issue 3 (Jun 2023)

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The Provision and Experience of Variety in Physical Activity Settings: A Systematic Review of Quantitative and Qualitative Studies

Narelle Eather, Emily McLachlan, Benjamin Sylvester, Mark Beauchamp, Colin Sanctuary, and David Lubans

Background: Emerging evidence indicates that the provision or experience of “variety” may be an important determinant of physical activity behavior. Variety refers to diverse endeavors, opportunities, or tasks and, in the context of physical activity, has been examined as a feature of an activity or environment (i.e., variety support) and an experience (i.e., one’s felt experience or perceived variety). Objective: The primary aim of our review was to synthesize studies investigating the provision or experience of variety in physical activity settings on health and well-being, behaviors, and motivation. Our secondary aim was to examine quantitative data reporting on different facets of variety in physical activity settings. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of five electronic databases (Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Science Direct, MEDLINE, and the Human Kinetics Library) to identify studies providing a quantitative or qualitative assessment of variety in physical activity settings. Results: We identified 5,576 potentially relevant articles to examine. After title and abstract screening (and removal of duplicates), 74 articles remained for full-text screening, from which 28 studies were deemed eligible. Our findings from qualitative and quantitative (experimental and cross-sectional) studies demonstrate that the provision and experience of variety relates to participation and engagement in physical activity, motivation for exercise and physical activity, and well-being outcomes. Our results also indicate that the provision of variety can increase enjoyment, interest (i.e., motivation), and adherence to a physical activity program. Conclusion: Our findings support the assertion that variety should be considered during planning, implementation, and evaluation of physical activity programs. Additional experimental studies are needed to gain a better understanding of how elements of physical activity and exercise programs, delivery, and environment can be manipulated to increase variety and foster participation in physical activity.

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Investigating Intraindividual Variability of Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Relations With Subsequent Physical Activity

Erin J. Reifsteck, Derek J. Hevel, Shelby N. Anderson, Amanda L. Rebar, and Jaclyn P. Maher

Heeding recent calls to capture dynamic variability of physical activity (PA) motivation within a self-determination theory framework, this study examined the extent to which psychological needs satisfaction in PA predicted subsequent PA, disaggregating within-person and between-persons data. University students (N = 89) wore an ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer for 6 days and reported basic psychological needs satisfaction daily. Multilevel models examined whether competence, autonomy, and relatedness for the previous day’s PA (>2,020 counts per minute) predicted the following day’s minutes of PA (>2,020 counts per minute), controlling for previous-day PA. Participants who, on average, reported greater feelings of autonomy and competence tended to engage in more minutes of PA the following day. When participants reported feeling greater relatedness than what was typical for them, they tended to engage in more PA the following day. Psychological needs vary day to day, but how and to what extent they predict PA depends on the specific need.

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Volume 45 (2023): Issue S1 (May 2023)

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North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity

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Can You Tell Who Scores? An Assessment of the Recognition of Affective States Based on the Nonverbal Behavior of Amateur Tennis Players in Competitive Matches

Julian Fritsch, Kirstin Seiler, Matthias Wagner, Chris Englert, and Darko Jekauc

The purpose of the present study was to assess whether the recognition of tennis players’ affective state associated with their nonverbal behavior would be influenced by (a) the importance of the situation, (b) the point outcome, and (c) the tennis expertise of the observer. Two hundred sixty-nine participants (M age = 30.51 years; 116 female; 79 tennis club members) watched video excerpts showing the nonverbal behavior of amateur tennis players during competitive matches immediately after the end of a rally and were asked to estimate whether the player had just won or lost the point. Results indicate that the recognition rates were higher for situations closer to the end of a game, closer to the end of a set, and with a tighter score during a game. Moreover, recognition rates were higher for lost than for won points, while the tennis expertise of participants had no influence on the recognition rates.

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Digest

Kim Gammage, Jeff Caron, Alyson Crozier, Alison Ede, Christopher Hill, Matt Hoffman, Sascha Leisterer, Sean Locke, Desi McEwan, Kathleen Mellano, Eva Pila, and Matthew Stork

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Volume 45 (2023): Issue 2 (Apr 2023)

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A Methodological Checklist for Studies of Pleasure and Enjoyment Responses to High-Intensity Interval Training: Part I. Participants and Measures

Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Mark E. Hartman, and Matthew A. Ladwig

For decades, the exercise psychology research literature echoed the conclusion that exercise makes most people feel better, with no clear evidence that this “feel-better effect” is moderated by intensity. An overhaul of the methodological approach subsequently showed that high-intensity exercise is experienced as unpleasant, and the “feel-better effect,” although possible, is conditional and therefore not as robust or prevalent as initially thought. Recently, several studies investigating high-intensity interval training (HIIT) have concluded that HIIT is pleasant and enjoyable, despite the high intensity. Considering that HIIT is emerging as an option in physical activity recommendations and exercise prescription guidelines, in part due to these claims, a methodological checklist is presented to aid researchers, peer reviewers, editors, and other readers in critically appraising studies examining the effects of HIIT on affect and enjoyment. This first part addresses the characteristics and number of participants, as well as the selection of measures of affect and enjoyment.