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Jing Liao, Sanmei Chen, Sha Chen and Yung-Jen Yang

This study aimed to examine personal and social environmental correlates of the physical activity habit of middle-aged and older adults, using Chinese square dancing as a natural exploratory example. Participants were 385 adults aged ≥45 years (93% female), who habitually danced on squares or parks of three old districts of Guangzhou. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify personal, social, psychological, and behavioral correlates of multiyear dance. Old age, high education, sufficient leisure time, and stable social environmental factors were associated with persistent dancing, whereby education (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 1.64, 95% confidence interval [1.05, 2.57]) and social engagement (RRR = 1.66, 95% confidence interval [1.05, 2.63]) showed the largest effects. Participants dancing ≤1 year were least satisfied with their social relationships than their counterparts dancing 1–5 years (RRR = 0.68) or over 5 years (RRR = 0.58). Physical activity promotion for older adults should adapt from culturally appropriate group activities and leverage community social resources to encourage voluntary participation, particularly for low-educated older women.

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Dietrich Rothenbacher, Dhayana Dallmeier, Michael D. Denkinger, Bernhard O. Boehm, Wolfgang Koenig, Jochen Klenk and ActiFE Study Group

Besides its known function as a transport protein for testosterone and other steroid hormones, sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) is a biomarker associated with many adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of physical activity with SHBG serum levels in older adults. The physical activity and SHBG values for 1,259 older adults (43.4% female; 56.6% male) with a mean age of 75.6 ± 6.5 years were included in the analysis. The average daily walking duration was 104.2 ± 40.4 (mean ± SD) min. A positive dose–response relationship of daily walking duration with quartiles of SHBG was seen after adjustment for age, sex, history of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, smoking, γ-glutamyl transferase, and C-reactive protein (p for trend = .010). However, this relationship disappeared after adjustment for body mass index (p for trend = .977). Body mass index seems to be an important determinant of SHBG and a possible confounding factor in the relationship of physical activity and SHBG.

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Eduardo L. Caputo, Paulo H. Ferreira, Manuela L. Ferreira, Andréa D. Bertoldi, Marlos R. Domingues, Debra Shirley and Marcelo C. Silva

Background: To investigate whether engagement in leisure-time physical activity before or during pregnancy is associated with low back pain (LBP) outcomes during pregnancy and postpartum prevalence of LBP in women who reported LBP during pregnancy. Methods: Data from the 2015 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study, were used. Demographic, socioeconomic, and gestational characteristics, as well as physical activity prior to and during pregnancy were recorded at perinatal assessment. LBP outcomes during pregnancy (pain intensity, activity limitation, and care seeking) and postpartum (prevalence of LBP) were collected at the 1-year follow-up. Results: Pain intensity, care seeking, and prevalence of LBP postpartum period were not associated with physical activity either before or during pregnancy. However, women engaged in physical activity during pregnancy and at least for 2 trimesters had lower odds ratio of activity limitation associated with LBP during pregnancy (odds ratio: 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 0.88; odds ratio: 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.86, respectively). Conclusion: Meeting the recommended levels of physical activity during pregnancy is associated with less activity limitation related to LBP during pregnancy. However, physical activity levels, either before or during pregnancy, were not associated with pain intensity, care seeking, and postpartum LBP.

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Tania Pereira, John Durocher and Jamie Burr

Background: Insufficient physical activity (PA) is associated with numerous chronic diseases and premature mortality, and the challenge of meeting recommended PA guidelines is exacerbated in the winter. Snowmobiling can potentially contribute to PA accumulation, but the objective metabolic and physical demands are unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the physical demands of riding a snowmobile. Methods: Habitual snowmobile riders responded to a survey describing a typical ride (n = 4015). Using this data, terrain-specific testing courses were created, and recreational snowmobile riders (n = 40) participated in a scaled representative ride (21 [8] min) while aerobic metabolism (VO2) and muscular fatigue were quantified. Results: The mean VO2 while riding, irrespective of terrain, was 18.5 (8.4) mL·kg−1·min−1, with significant differences based on geographic location (13.4 [5.2] vs 25.7 [6.6] mL·kg−1·min−1, P < .001). Muscular fatigue was apparent in maximal handgrip (−7% [8%], P < .001) across both riding terrains, but not lower body power, suggesting a greater influence of an upper body strength component. Conclusions: Snowmobiling is an activity that generally falls within the moderate-intensity activity range and involves both aerobic fitness and muscular strength. There were substantial differences in demand between terrains, suggesting that additional benefits may be conferred from mountain riding as it was more metabolically demanding.

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Ryan S. Garten, Matthew C. Scott, Tiffany M. Zúñiga, Austin C. Hogwood, R. Carson Fralin and Jennifer Weggen

Background: This study sought to determine the impact of an acute prior bout of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise on attenuating the vascular dysfunction associated with a prolonged sedentary bout. Methods: Ten young (24 ± 1 y) healthy males completed two 3-hour sessions of prolonged sitting with (SIT-EX) and without (SIT) a high-intensity interval aerobic exercise session performed immediately prior. Prior to and 3 hours into the sitting bout, leg vascular function was assessed with the passive leg movement technique, and blood samples were obtained from the lower limb to evaluate changes in oxidative stress (malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase) and inflammation (interleukin-6). Results: No presitting differences in leg vascular function (assessed via passive leg movement technique-induced hyperemia) were revealed between conditions. After 3 hours of prolonged sitting, leg vascular function was significantly reduced in the SIT condition, but unchanged in the SIT-EX. Lower limb blood samples revealed no alterations in oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, or inflammation in either condition. Conclusions: This study revealed that lower limb vascular dysfunction was significantly attenuated by an acute presitting bout of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise. Further analysis of lower limb blood samples revealed no changes in circulating oxidative stress or inflammation in either condition.

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Julie D. Guldager, Anja Leppin, Jesper von Seelen and Pernille T. Andersen

Background: The reasons for the mixed evidence of the effectiveness of school-based physical activity programs can be many, including implementation challenges. Studying program implementation can potentially contribute to enhancing effectiveness, the design of future interventions, improved implementation, and the interpretation of outcomes. Methods: For this process evaluation, individual interviews were conducted with 16 teachers who had implemented the program “Active All Year Round” in a fifth-grade school class (students aged 9–11 y) in 2017. Through systematic text condensation feasibility and barriers of program implementation, perceived program reach and the programs’ influence on social cohesion were identified and discussed. Results: Teachers described the program as very feasible to implement and identified very few implementation barriers, the most prominent being time constrains. Perceived program reach was very high, and teachers reported that those students who are less confident when it comes to physical activity did not have differential participation than those feeling more confident about physical activity. Finally, the program was perceived to positively affect social cohesion in class. Conclusions: Active All Year Round is a standardized, flexible, and easily implemented program in Danish schools. Future studies are needed to study implementation from a student’s perspective and/or students’ role in and experiences with competition-based health programs.

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A. Stefanie Mikolaizak, Jochen Klenk, Dietrich Rothenbacher, Michael D. Denkinger, Kilian Rapp and for the ActiFE Study Group

Time spent out-of-home can increase physical activity (PA) levels. However, the association between the purpose for leaving home and the mode of transport on time out-of-home and PA are not straightforward. In a large sample of community-dwelling older adults (≥65 years), daily walking duration was measured prospectively over 1 week using body-fixed sensors and time-out-of-home questionnaires. Data from 1,277 participants yielded 6,500 full days for analysis. The following statistically significant associations were seen: public transport use increased the time spent out-of-home by 88 min and daily walking duration by 16 min. Social contacts or the use of a car increased the time out-of-home, but decreased PA. Shopping or “going by foot” decreased the time spent out-of-home by 19 and 62 min, respectively, while both increased the daily walking duration by 5 min. The association between time out-of-home and PA (daily walking duration) is strongly dependent on the activity and mode of transport.

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Justine B. Allen and Colleen Reid

Research continues to demonstrate the underrepresentation of women coaches and that barriers outweigh support. The purpose of this practical article is to describe the process undertaken by a National Governing Body of Sport to deliver a learning and development program to support women hockey coaches in Scotland, the Women in Coaching program. Our aim is to share understanding about this example of good practice to provide insight and direction for change that can enhance the experiences and provisions of coach education and development for women coaches. First, we explain the use of scaffolding as a concept to capture the approach adopted in the program to bring together a range of learning situations (e.g., coach education, workshops, systematic observation of coaching practice, mentoring). We then describe and discuss the evidence gathered to inform program development (i.e., workforce analysis, interviews with coaches). Next the delivery of the program and assessment of its impact are discussed (i.e., pre-post self-perceptions, players’ perceptions, coaching behaviors, reflective survey). Finally we present best practices based on the lessons learned from our involvement with the program over the past six years.

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Chelsea L. Kracht, Elizabeth K. Webster and Amanda E. Staiano

Background: Little is known about variation in meeting the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines (including physical activity [PA], sleep, and screen time [ST]) in early childhood. The aim was to evaluate sociodemographic differences in meeting the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines. Methods: Parents of 3–4 year old children reported sociodemographic information and ST. Sleep and PA were measured using accelerometry, and height and weight were objectively measured. The 24-Hour Movement Guidelines include daily PA (total PA: ≥3 h; including ≥1 h of moderate to vigorous), sleep (10–13 h), and ST (≤1 h). Meeting guidelines by age, sex, race, poverty level, and weight status were assessed using chi-square and linear regression models. Results: Of 107 children, 57% were white and 26% lived in households at or below the poverty level. Most children met the PA (91.5%) and sleep (86.9%) guidelines, but few met ST (14.0%) or all 3 (11.3%) guidelines. African American children and children who lived at or below the poverty level were less likely to meet the sleep, ST, and all 3 guidelines compared with others (P < .01 for all). There were no other differences. Conclusion: These results suggest future interventions should focus on reducing differences in movement, namely in sleep and ST.

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Alixandra N. Krahn

The issue of too few females coaching in high-performance Canadian sport contexts is well documented. There is extensive research and programing dedicated to addressing this issue; however, the number of women in high-performance coaching positions within Canada continues to decline. Mentorship is a best practice to advance women into competitive sport coaching roles, and a more recent finding suggests that sponsorship may also be necessary. In this article Canadian national/federal sport policies were analyzed in an effort to better understand how these Canadian sport policies inform and impact the mentorship and/or sponsorship of women coaches. The analysis of four federal government sport policy documents—Actively Engaged, the Canadian Sport Policy, the Coaching Association of Canada’s and the Sport Information Resource Center’s Equity and Access Policy—revealed that none of these pertinent policy documents make explicit reference to mentorship and/or sponsorship programing with the intent to advance more women into high-performance sport coaching positions. As such, the major argument of this study is that the Canadian sport policy sector needs to create policy documents that practically inform programing geared towards nascent female sport coaches and that the voices of female coaches who have been impacted by Canadian sport policies and programing alike, need to be incorporated into these policies.