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Perceptions of Self-Care and Work–Life Balance Among Secondary School Athletic Trainers

Stephanie M. Singe, Alexandrya H. Cairns, and Christianne M. Eason

The athletic training research agenda identifies a need for exploration on strategies for improved work–life balance. One unexplored area is self-care practices used to maintain work–life balance. Fourteen (six males, eight females) athletic trainers employed in the secondary school setting participated in a qualitative research study. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive approach as prescribed by phenomenological approach. Data saturation guided recruitment and peer review and intercoder reliability was used for credibility. Secondary school athletic trainers are engaging in self-care practices regularly and connect those activities to their work–life balance. Self-care practices are designed to create “me time” and are geared toward physical and social self-care activities. In addition, our results address the interchangeable thoughts of self-care practices, stress relief, and work–life balance.

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Work–Family Conflict: Understanding Workplace Relationships for Collegiate Athletic Trainers

Stephanie M. Singe, Chloe Tannebaum, and Alexandrya H. Cairns

Role congruence has been suggested to be a facilitator for work–life balance for the athletic trainer, but to date, it has only been superficially explored. Conceptually, role congruence is based on relationships and roles within the organization; thus, the purpose of the study was to further investigate professional relationships between coaches and athletic trainers related to work–life balance. To accomplish this, 28 credentialed athletic trainers were interviewed via the Zoom platform. Three identifiable themes were found within the data. The first them role congruence reduces stress for the athletic trainer and was supported by two themes: (a) role congruence facilitates a positive work environment and (b) incongruence facilitates a stressful work environment. The second theme, peak season expectations and job demands limit work–life balance, was defined by (a) hours worked, (b) coaches’ expectations, and (c) sport is demanding, which impacts work–life balance.

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Case in Point: Skating Into Sports Medicine

Emily Kirillov, Mara Smith, and Jeffrey B. Driban

Patients deserve an opportunity to tell clinicians and researchers their views about how sports medicine could better address their needs. In our “Case in Point” article, we provide an internationally competitive figure skater with a chance to identify her community’s needs and suggest solutions. We then have a clinician who works with skaters provide their perspective on the skater’s call to action. Finally, a researcher shares suggestions based on the views of the skater and clinician. We hope this “Case in Point” article highlights how novel clinical and research ideas can be sparked by creating a forum for athletes/patients, providers, and researchers to share ideas.

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Perceived Stress, Work–Family Conflict, and Burnout in Irish Certified Athletic Therapists

Siobhán O’Connor, Courtney O’Connor, Sadhbh McCarthy, and Stephanie Mazerolle Singe

Burnout and its associated factors are a concern for U.S. athletic trainers, but no research has investigated it from an international perspective. We examined perceived stress, work–family conflict, burnout, coping, and self-care practices in Irish certified athletic therapists. Low burnout (41.0 ± 12.1) and moderate perceived stress levels (17.8 ± 6.2) were observed. Certified athletic therapists with children had significantly higher work–family conflict (p = .02, η p 2 = .11 ) and time-based conflict (p < .001, η p 2 = .22 ) than those without. Moderate resilient coping was noted (14.7 ± 2.5). Low burnout was found, likely due to the use of resilient coping strategies. Time was a limiting factor for both self-care and experiences of work–family conflict.

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Assessment of Concussion Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors Among Adolescent Female Club Soccer Athletes

Bridget Davidson, Madyson Anglim, and Richelle M. Williams

Concussion education for athletes is essential for informed decision making to aid recovery. Education about concussion symptoms, treatment, and protocols can improve symptom recognition, reporting behaviors, protocol compliance, and overall health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to understand current concussion knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among female club soccer players aged 12–18 years. Findings identified gaps in concussion education and knowledge among these athletes. Continued concussion education efforts are needed to increase concussion knowledge and players’ confidence, focusing on creative education practices.

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NATA News & Notes

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Continuing Education Assessment

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Volume 28 (2023): Issue 2 (Mar 2023)

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Tarsal Navicular Stress Fractures: A Rare Soccer Injury Twelve-Year Follow-Up of the First Reported Case in a Professional Player and Literature Review

Sergio Barroso Rosa, Manuel Aniel-Quiroga Bilbao, and Daniel De Santos Tena

Tarsal navicular stress fractures are rare injuries, mostly occurring in long-distance runners, jumpers, and occasionally affecting athletes in high-contact sports such as rugby or American/Australian football. This condition generally represents a clinical challenge, resulting in considerable diagnostic delays. While the ideal treatment is still controversial, surgical treatment seems to provide good results in recovering function and return to play. Tarsal navicular stress fractures have been extremely rare in soccer players; only seven published cases have been located to date. This article is a paradigmatic report on a professional player with this injury and a successful outcome after a 12-year follow-up.

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NATA News & Notes