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Susumu Iwasaki, Mary D. Fry, and Candace M. Hogue

The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating role of mindful engagement in the relationship between male high school athletes’ motivational climate perceptions on their teams (i.e., caring, task-, and ego-involving climate) to athlete coachability. Athletes (N = 164, M age = 15.58 years) from multiple sports completed measures assessing mindful engagement in sport (Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale—Revised), Caring Climate Scale, task- and ego-involving climate perceptions (Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire), and coachability (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory). Initial bivariate correlations linked mindful engagement and coachability positively with perceptions of a caring and task-involving climate and negatively with ego-involving climate perceptions. Structural equation modeling analyses then revealed mindful engagement mediated the relationship between climate and coachability. Encouraging coaches and players to foster a caring/task-involving climate might assist in enhancing athletes’ mindful engagement in sport, which may positively influence the degree to which they are coachable.

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Dhruv Gupta, Jeffrey A. Reinbolt, and Cyril J. Donnelly

Knee abduction/adduction moment and knee internal rotation moment are known surrogate measures of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) load during tasks like sidestepping and single-leg landing. Previous experimental literature has shown that a variety of kinematic strategies are associated or correlated with ACL injury risk; however, the optimal kinematic strategies needed to reduce peak knee moments and ACL injury are not well understood. To understand the complex, multifaceted kinematic factors underpinning ACL injury risk and to optimize kinematics to prevent the ACL injury, a musculoskeletal modeling and simulation experimental design was used. A 14-segment, 37-degree-of-freedom, dynamically consistent skeletal model driven by force/torque actuators was used to simulate whole-body single-leg jump landing kinematics. Using the residual reduction algorithm in OpenSim, whole-body kinematics were optimized to reduce the peak knee abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation moments simultaneously. This optimization was repeated across 30 single-leg jump landing trials from 10 participants. The general optimal kinematic strategy was to bring the knee to a more neutral alignment in the transverse plane and frontal plane (featured by reduced hip adduction angle and increased knee adduction angle). This optimized whole-body kinematic strategy significantly reduced the peak knee abduction/adduction and internal rotation moments, transferring most of the knee load to the hip.

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Dana K. Voelker, Nick Galli, Maya Miyairi, Justine J. Reel, and Karley James

Unhealthy cognitive–emotional relationships with exercise can hinder positive treatment outcomes when left unaddressed. However, clinicians lack validated tools to monitor this aspect of treatment. This study examined the 14-item Intuitive Exercise Scale with 165 patients in the United States (M age = 26.48 years) who were receiving treatment for an eating disorder. The original factor structure was inadequate for the current sample, and exploratory factor analysis generated three factors—emotional exercise, body intuition, and exercise variety. The three-factor solution yielded strong internal consistency and partial support for the scale’s validity. Furthermore, patients scored lowest in body intuition, confirming low awareness of bodily cues common in patients with eating disorders. This study informs how clinicians may integrate and monitor patients’ cognitive–emotional relationship with exercise as part of holistic and intuitive eating disorder treatment approaches.

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Graig M. Chow, Matthew D. Bird, Stinne Soendergaard, and Todd A. Gilson

The rate of alcohol consumption among student-athletes places them at risk for engaging in unsafe behaviors. Although coaches play a key role in regulating alcohol use among athletes, many lack the knowledge and self-confidence to be effective. This study aimed to examine the relationship between alcohol consumption literacy and alcohol confrontation efficacy among National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and attempted to identify types of training and education wanted to better manage student-athlete alcohol use. A total of 518 National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches completed alcohol consumption literacy and alcohol confrontation efficacy measures and two open-ended questions about what kind of alcohol training, information, and skills were needed. When accounting for previous education/training and gender of team coached, alcohol consumption literacy predicted all confrontation efficacy subscales. Content analysis showed coaches wanted training related to alcohol literacy, effective communication, and prevention planning. Findings have implications for designing alcohol prevention and intervention programs aimed at National Collegiate Athletic Association coaches.

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Brenda Carolina Nájera Chávez, Stefan Mark Rueckriegel, Roland Burghardt, and Pablo Hernáiz Driever

Drawing and handwriting are fine motor skills acquired during childhood. We analyzed the development of laterality by comparing the performance of the dominant with the nondominant hand and the effect of bimanual interference in kinematic hand movement parameters (speed, automation, variability, and pressure). Healthy subjects (n = 187, 6–18 years) performed drawing tasks with both hands on a digitizing tablet followed by performance in the presence of an interfering task of the nondominant hand. Age correlated positively with speed, automation, and pressure, and negatively with variability for both hands. As task complexity increased, differences between both hands were less pronounced. Playing an instrument had a positive effect on the nondominant hand. Speed and automation showed a strong association with lateralization. Bimanual interference was associated with an increase of speed and variability. Maturation of hand laterality and the extent of bimanual interference in fine motor tasks are age-dependent processes.

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Jessica Murphy, Christopher Gladney, and Philip Sullivan

Student athletes balance academic, social, and athletic demands, often leading to increased levels of stress and poor sleep. This study explores the relationship between sleep quality, sleep hygiene, and psychological distress in a sample of student athletes. Ninety-four student athletes completed the six-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6), Sleep Hygiene Practice Scale, and four components from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Age, gender, and sport were also collected. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index revealed that 44.7% of student athletes received ≥6.5 hr of sleep each night; 31% of athletes showed signs of severe mental illness according to the K6. Stepwise regression predicted K6 scores with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Sleep Hygiene Practice Scale scores as independent variables. A significant model accounting for 26% of the variation in K6 scores emerged; sleep schedule and sleep disturbances were significant predictors. Athletic staff should highlight the importance of sleep for mental health; suggestions on how to help athletes are provided.

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Daniel J. Madigan, Henrik Gustafsson, Andrew P. Hill, Kathleen T. Mellano, Christine E. Pacewicz, Thomas D. Raedeke, and Alan L. Smith

The present editorial provides a series of perspectives on the future of burnout in sport. Specifically, for the first time, seven burnout researchers have offered their opinions and suggestions for how, as a field, we can progress our understanding of this important topic. A broad range of ideas are discussed, including the relevance of the social context, the value of theory and collaboration, and the use of public health frameworks in future work. It is hoped that these perspectives will help stimulate debate, reinforce and renew priorities, and guide research in this area over the coming years.

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Danielle Peers, Lindsay Eales, Kelvin Jones, Aidan Toth, Hernish Acharya, and Janice Richman–Eisenstat

The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and meaningfulness of a 15-week recreational dance and singing program for people with neuromuscular conditions. Within a transformative mixed-methods design, pulmonary function tests, plethysmography through wearable technology (Hexoskin vests), individualized neuromuscular quality-of-life assessments (version 2.0), and semistructured interviews were used. The interviews were analyzed through inductive, semantic thematic analysis. Although the sample sizes were small (six people with neuromuscular conditions), the authors found no evidence of safety concerns. There was evidence of respiratory improvements and reported improvements in swallowing and speech. The most notable quality-of-life changes included improvements related to weakness, swallowing, relationships, and leisure. The participants shared that the program offered meaningful social connection and embodied skills and safe and pleasurable physical exertion. The authors learned that recreational singing and dancing programs could be a safe and deeply meaningful activity for those with neuromuscular conditions that impact respiration.

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Rachel K. Straub, Alex Horgan, and Christopher M. Powers

Given that increased use of the knee extensors relative to the hip extensors may contribute to various knee injuries, there is a need for a practical method to characterize movement behavior indicative of how individuals utilize the hip and knee extensors during dynamic tasks. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the difference between sagittal plane trunk and tibia orientations obtained from 2D video (2D trunk–tibia) could be used to predict the average hip/knee extensor moment ratio during athletic movements. Thirty-nine healthy athletes (15 males and 24 females) performed 6 tasks (step down, drop jump, lateral shuffle, deceleration, triple hop, and side-step-cut). Lower-extremity kinetics (3D) and sagittal plane video (2D) were collected simultaneously. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine if the 2D trunk–tibia angle at peak knee flexion predicted the average hip/knee extensor moment ratio during the deceleration phase of each task. For each task, an increase in the 2D trunk–tibia angle predicted an increase in the average hip/knee extensor moment ratio when adjusted for body mass (all P < .013, R 2 = .17–.77). The 2D trunk–tibia angle represents a practical method to characterize movement behavior that is indicative of how individuals utilize the hip and knee extensors during dynamic tasks.