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Volume 34 (2024): Issue 2 (Mar 2024)

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Volume 19 (2024): Issue 3 (Mar 2024)

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Volume 38 (2024): Issue 1 (Mar 2024)

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Effects of Situated Game Teaching Through Set Plays on Badminton Tactical Knowledge, Technical Ability, and Game Performance Among Turkish Secondary School Students

Erhan Devrilmez, Weidong Li, Fatih Dervent, Mustafa Çabıtçı, and Senlin Chen

Background: The Situated Game Teaching Through Set Plays (SGTSP) model, a newly proposed curricular model, extends the previous game-based approaches by adopting the Theory of Situated Learning as a framework to focus on the relational and situational nature of the changing relations of all game parameters in a specific momentary game scenario. However, as a new game-based model, SGTSP warrants further empirical research investigations to establish its effectiveness at advancing student learning such as skill acquisition and game competence. Purpose: To examine the effects of the SGTSP curricular model on secondary school students’ tactical knowledge, technical ability, and game performance in badminton when compared with a technique-focused approach during a 10-lesson unit. Methods: A completely randomized block design with a repeated measure was used to address the research purpose. A sample of 158 sixth graders from eight classes at two Turkish middle schools (67 girls and 89 boys; M age = 12.62 ± 0.47) were assigned to either the SGTSP (n = 79 from four classes) or the technique-focused approach conditions (n = 79 from four classes) for the experiment. Assessments were conducted before and after the badminton instructional unit. The statistical models consisted of one of the four technical ability performances, components of game performance, or tactical knowledge as a dependent variable and eight independent variables: teacher, treatment, class nested within teacher and treatment, gender, skill levels, and three 2-way interactions between treatment, gender, and skill levels. A series of repeated-measure multivariate analyses of variance were conducted to analyze the data. Results: Participants in both groups improved tactical knowledge, forehand long serve, forehand clear, smash, and drop skills, and game performances from pre to post. Participants in the SGTSP condition showed significantly greater improvements ( η p 2 = .39 .96 ). Discussion and Conclusion: The findings of this study substantiated the positive effects of the SGTSP model on developing secondary school students’ badminton tactical knowledge, technical ability, and game performances in badminton compared with the traditional technique-focused approach.

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The Palgrave Handbook of Disability Sport in Europe: Policies, Structures, and Participation

Wellington De Luna-Vazquez and Deborah Shapiro

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Effect of Combined Training With Balance, Strength, and Plyometrics on Physical Performance in Male Sprint Athletes With Intellectual Disabilities

Ghada Jouira, Haithem Rebai, Dan Iulian Alexe, and Sonia Sahli

Individuals with intellectual disabilities often face unique challenges in physical capabilities, making traditional training methods less effective for their specific needs. This study aimed to investigate the effect of combining balance, plyometric, and strength (CBPS) training with sprint training on physical performance in male athletes with intellectual disabilities. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to either a CBPS group or a control group that only maintained their regular sprint training. Participants underwent pre- and posttraining tests, including measures of balance, jumping, agility, and sprinting ability. The results showed that the CBPS group demonstrated significant improvements (p < .05) in one-leg stance, crossover-hop jump, squat jump, countermovement jump, and 10- and 30-m sprint at posttraining compared with pretraining. CBPS training combined with sprinting significantly improves physical performance in male athletes with intellectual disabilities, suggesting implications for tailored training programs to enhance their physical fitness and overall health.

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Effects of a 6-Week Repeated-Sprint Training With Voluntary Hypoventilation at Low and High Lung Volume on Repeated-Sprint Ability in Female Soccer Players

Mounir Ait Ali Braham, Youva Ouchen, and Xavier Woorons

Purpose: To investigate the effects of repeated-sprint training with voluntary hypoventilation at low (RSH-VHL) and high (RS-VHH) lung volume on repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in female athletes. Methods: Over a 6-week period, 24 female soccer players completed 12 sessions of repeated 30-m running sprints with end-expiratory breath holding (RSH-VHL, n = 8), end-inspiratory breath holding (RS-VHH, n = 8), or unrestricted breathing (RS-URB, n = 8). Before and after training, a running RSA test consisting of performing 30-m all-out sprints until exhaustion was implemented. Results: From before to after training, the number of sprints completed during the RSA test was increased in both RSH-VHL (19.3 [0.9] vs 22.6 [0.9]; P < .01) and RS-VHH (19.3 [1.5] vs 20.5 [1.7]; P < .01) but not in RS-URB (19.4 [1.3] vs 19.5 [1.7]; P = .67). The mean velocity and the percentage decrement score calculated over sprints 1 to 17 were, respectively, higher (82.2% [1.8%] vs 84.6% [2.1%] of maximal velocity) and lower (23.7% [3.1%] vs 19.4% [3.2%]) in RSH-VHL (P < .01), whereas they remained unchanged in RS-VHH and RS-URB. The mean arterial oxygen saturation recorded during training at the end of the sprints was lower in RSH-VHL (92.1% [0.4%]) than in RS-VHH (97.3% [0.1%]) and RS-URB (97.8% [0.1%]). Conclusions: This study shows that female athletes can benefit from the RSH-VHL intervention to improve RSA. The performance gains may have been limited by the short sprinting distance with end-expiratory breath holding, which provoked only moderate hypoxemia. The increase in the number of sprints in RS-VHH seems to show that factors other than hypoxia may have played a role in RSA improvement.

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Sequential Mapping of Game Patterns in Men and Women Professional Padel Players

Rafael Conde-Ripoll, Diego Muñoz, Adrián Escudero-Tena, and Javier Courel-Ibáñez

Purpose: This study analyzed the sequences of actions in professional men and women padel players to identify common game patterns. Methods: The sample comprised 17,557 stroke-by-stroke actions (N = 1640 rallies) of the championship World Padel Tour. Multistep Markov chains were used to calculate the conditional probabilities of occurrence of actions during the rally. Results: Results revealed that men’s and women’s padel is mainly defined by 36 patterns constituting 55% and 63% of all actions in the game, respectively, with the 10 most common sequences accounting for 42% to 45% of the game. There were recurrent technical–tactical actions with specific offensive and defensive functions that were constantly reiterated during the rallies. In men, the use of smash, volley, bandeja, direct, back wall, back-wall lobs, and direct lobs followed a foreseeable pattern up to 8 lags, whereas women described predictable interactions for volley, bandeja, direct, lobs, and direct lobs up to 5 lags and for smash and back wall up to 4 lags. Conclusions: The ability of padel players to recall these patterns and enhance their anticipation skills may potentially improve their performance. These findings contribute to a better knowledge of professional padel game dynamics while providing coaches and players with useful information to optimize training and decision-making strategies.

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Academic Life: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Robert P. Lamberts and N. Tim Cable

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Predicting Soccer Players’ Fitness Status Through a Machine-Learning Approach

Mauro Mandorino, Jo Clubb, and Mathieu Lacome

Purpose: The study had 3 purposes: (1) to develop an index using machine-learning techniques to predict the fitness status of soccer players, (2) to explore the index’s validity and its relationship with a submaximal run test (SMFT), and (3) to analyze the impact of weekly training load on the index and SMFT outcomes. Methods: The study involved 50 players from an Italian professional soccer club. External and internal loads were collected during training sessions. Various machine-learning algorithms were assessed for their ability to predict heart-rate responses during the training drills based on external load data. The fitness index, calculated as the difference between actual and predicted heart rates, was correlated with SMFT outcomes. Results: Random forest regression (mean absolute error = 3.8 [0.05]) outperformed the other machine-learning algorithms (extreme gradient boosting and linear regression). Average speed, minutes from the start of the training session, and the work:rest ratio were identified as the most important features. The fitness index displayed a very large correlation (r = .70) with SMFT outcomes, with the highest result observed during possession games and physical conditioning exercises. The study revealed that heart-rate responses from SMFT and the fitness index could diverge throughout the season, suggesting different aspects of fitness. Conclusions: This study introduces an “invisible monitoring” approach to assess soccer player fitness in the training environment. The developed fitness index, in conjunction with traditional fitness tests, provides a comprehensive understanding of player readiness. This research paves the way for practical applications in soccer, enabling personalized training adjustments and injury prevention.