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Henk Erik Meier, Jörg Hagenah and Malte Jetzke

As Hutchins and Rowe have emphasized, digital plenitude will fundamentally affect sports broadcasting. In particular, niche sports will be confronted with a more difficult media environment in which the chances of being telecast may increase, while the chances of finding an audience are likely to decrease. Therefore, niche sports face the need to further submit to a media logic. The current research is a case study involving an analysis of the 2018 European Championships from a mediatization perspective. While the findings show how aggregation helped to revitalize audience interest, the case study reveals that the future of niche-sport broadcasting is uncertain, because the audience habits that the European Championships exploited are fading.

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Matheus Barbalho, Ana Francisca Rozin Kleiner, Bianca Callegari, Ramon Costa de Lima, Givago da Silva Souza, Anselmo de Athayde Costa e Silva and Victor Silveira Coswig

Background: Jumps are important evaluation tools for muscle strength and power and for interlimb asymmetries. Different jump tests are well related to athletic performance, prediction of injury risk, and common motor gestures of several sports such as soccer. Low-cost mobile applications (apps) have gained popularity for this measure. The authors hypothesized that the My Jump 2 app would be a valid tool to assess drop-jump performance and interlimb asymmetry in soccer players. Methods: Eleven male soccer players took part in this study (18.2 [1.3] y, 69.9 [9.5] kg, 174 [6.6] cm). The athletes performed each test twice on a force plate (gold-standard method), while the jumps were recorded through the mobile app. Measures with the My Jump 2 app were applied by 2 evaluators, independently and in duplicate (interrater and intrarater reliability). The agreement analysis between both evaluations was done using an intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland–Altman plots. Results: Compared with the force platform, the app tested showed excellent reliability for the drop jump’s flight time and interlimb asymmetry (intraclass correlation coefficient > .98). For interlimb contact-time asymmetry, the values were 18.4 (9.9) and 19.1 (9.9) milliseconds for the My Jump 2 app and the force platform, respectively (P = .88). For flight-time asymmetries, the values were 389.7 (114.3) and 396.8 (112.5) milliseconds for the My Jump 2 app and the force platform, respectively (P = .88). Conclusion: The My Jump 2 app is a valid tool to assess drop-jump and interlimb asymmetry in soccer players.

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José Oliveira-Santos, Rute Santos, Carla Moreira, Sandra Abreu, Luís Lopes, César Agostinis-Sobrinho and Jorge Mota

Background: To explore the associations between birth weight and body mass index (BMI) from 6 months to 6 years of age, with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical activity, and sedentary time in adolescence. Methods: Retrospective school-based study with 539 adolescents (292 girls), mean age of 13.94 (1.62) years. Anthropometric data from birth up to 6 years were extracted from individual child health booklets. CRF was estimated by 20-m shuttle run test. Physical activity and sedentary time were assessed with accelerometers. Results: Birth weight was not associated with any outcome measured in adolescence. From the age of 6 months onwards in girls, and from 3 years in boys, BMI associated inversely with CRF in adolescence. In girls, BMI (at 12 mo and at 3 y of age) associated positively with sedentary time in adolescence, but not with physical activity. In boys, positive associations between BMI at the ages of 3, 5, and 6 years old and time spent in some intensities of physical activity in adolescence were found. Conclusions: BMI during the early years was negatively associated with CRF in adolescence, in a consistent way, for both genders, but with physical activity and sedentary time the associations were scarce and inconsistent, depending on the gender.

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Devin S. Kielur and Cameron J. Powden

Context: Impaired dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) has been established as a predictor of lower-extremity injury. Compression tissue flossing (CTF) may address tissue restrictions associated with impaired DFROM; however, a consensus is yet to support these effects. Objectives: To summarize the available literature regarding CTF on DFROM in physically active individuals. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed and EBSCOhost (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and SPORTDiscus) were searched from 1965 to July 2019 for related articles using combination terms related to CTF and DRFOM. Articles were included if they measured the immediate effects of CTF on DFROM. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. The level of evidence was assessed using the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy. The magnitude of CTF effects from pre-CTF to post-CTF and compared with a control of range of motion activities only were examined using Hedges g effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals. Randomeffects meta-analysis was performed to synthesize DFROM changes. Evidence Synthesis: A total of 6 studies were included in the analysis. The average Physiotherapy Evidence Database score was 60% (range = 30%–80%) with 4 out of 6 studies considered high quality and 2 as low quality. Meta-analysis indicated no DFROM improvements for CTF compared with range of motion activities only (effect size = 0.124; 95% confidence interval, −0.137 to 0.384; P = .352) and moderate improvements from pre-CTF to post-CTF (effect size = 0.455; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.889; P = .040). Conclusions: There is grade B evidence to suggest CTF may have no effect on DFROM when compared with a control of range of motion activities only and results in moderate improvements from pre-CTF to post-CTF. This suggests that DFROM improvements were most likely due to exercises completed rather than the band application.

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Kelly Cheever, Jeffrey T. Howard and Keisuke Kawata

Context: Increased injury rates following concussive injury have been attributed to decreased neuromuscular coordination frequently documented following a concussion. However, altered integration between the vestibular system and oculomotor pathways following impacts at subconcussive thresholds implicate all sports-related impacts not just those at a concussive threshold in future musculoskeletal injury. While, several studies have explored the utility of vestibular and oculomotor clinical testing to detect altered neuromuscular control and then correlated those alterations to future injury risk, no research has explored the use of cervical clinical tests in the same capacity. Outcome Measures: Cervical joint position error test, Neck Disability Index and head acceleration. Interventions: Soccer headers, fatigue protocol, soccer headers + fatigue. Objective: To explore the clinical utility of a novel clinical approach to measuring changes in cervical neuromuscular control following subconcussive impacts in a controlled lab environment. Participants: 40 current female colligate club soccer athletes were recruited. Inclusion criteria included between the age of 18 and 25 and a minimum of 4-year soccer heading experience. Setting: Laboratory. Design: A repeated-measures design with 4 groups was utilized to test the hypothesis. Results: A 65%, 54%, and 49% increased error was observed following the soccer heading, fatigue only, and soccer heading + fatigue interventions, respectively. Meanwhile, the controls saw a 6% decrease in neck position error. Concussion: While, cervical joint position error testing was sensitive to decreased neuromuscular coordination following soccer heading, it was not specific enough to rule out an exercise effect in the absence of subconcussive impacts. Further research is warranted to explore the clinical utility and specificity of cervical joint position error testing to measured alterations in supraspinal processing following subconcussive impacts, and how these alterations may lead to decreased coordination and movement of the body during sports-related task.

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Guneet Chawla, Madelon Hoppe, Nina Browner and Michael D. Lewek

The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in spatiotemporal gait measures induced by stepping to the beat of a metronome and to music cues of various frequencies in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Twenty-one participants with Parkinson’s disease were instructed to time their steps to a metronome and music cues (at 85%, 100%, and 115% of overground cadence). The authors calculated cadence, cadence accuracy, and step length during each cue condition and an uncued control condition. The music and metronome cues produced comparable results in cadence manipulation, with reduced cadence accuracy noted at slower intended frequencies. Nevertheless, the induced cadence elicited a concomitant alteration in step length. The music and metronome cues produced comparable changes to gait, but suggest that temporal control is more limited at slower frequencies, presumably by the challenge of increasing the step length.

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Figen Govsa, Gkionoul Nteli Chatzioglou, Simin Hepguler, Yelda Pinar and Ozden Bedre

Objective: This study examines the effect of the lower limb misalignment and its possible compensatory effect on plantar pressure in a normal population. The aim of this paper is to present a structured method for the analysis of posture and its changes using a standardized digital photography technique and plantar pressure measuring device. Design: Cohort. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: A total of 200 adult volunteers between 18 and 22 years of age who had no current symptoms of pain and foot or ankle pathology participated in the study. Main Outcome Measures: The gold standard measure of lower limb alignment with weight-bearing status is the mechanical axis and their angles using Image J software. Structural and functional measurements of the same foot were taken using a plantar pressure measuring device. In this study, 5 alignment (thigh, knee, leg, ankle, and foot) characteristics were measured on the lower limb using the 2 techniques, and, additionally, the foot contact area, peak pressure, foot axis, rearfoot angle, and subtalar joint flexibility score were analyzed in 10 different regions of the foot. Results: This study has shown a reasonable correlation between digitalized measurements and plantar pressures values. Quadriceps angle affected midfoot impulse, foot axis angle, subtalar joint minimum angle, and rearfoot angle positively. Subtalar joint flexibility scores were analyzed in 10 different regions of the foot. There was a positive correlation between rearfoot angle and quadriceps angle (P = .009, r = .261). Results of both methods show that they endorse each other. Conclusions: The posture of the standing feet may have influence on lower limb alignment. Currently, there are no studies carried out by using digital photogrammetry and foot scan. The authors claim that patient-friendly digital photogrammetry would have a positive contribution to the monitoring of patients, even including new ones in the treatment programs, reducing any possible loss in the personal and national economy.