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Open access

Nicholas Hattrup, Hannah Gray, Mark Krumholtz, and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod

Clinical Scenario: Recent systematic reviews have shown that extended rest may not be beneficial to patients following concussion. Furthermore, recent evidence has shown that patient with postconcussion syndrome benefit from an active rehabilitation program. There is currently a gap between the ability to draw conclusions to the use of aerobic exercise during the early stages of recovery along with the safety of these programs. Clinical Question: Following a concussion, does early controlled aerobic exercise, compared with either usual care or delayed exercise, improve recovery as defined by symptom duration and severity? Summary of Key Findings: After a thorough literature search, 5 studies relevant to the clinical question were selected. Of the 5 studies, 1 study was a randomized control trial, 2 studies were pilot randomized controlled trials, and 2 studies were retrospective. All 5 studies showed that implementing controlled aerobic exercise did not have an adverse effect on recovery. One study showed early aerobic exercise had a quicker return to school, and another showed a 2-day decrease in symptom duration. Clinical Bottom Line: There is sufficient evidence to suggest that early controlled aerobic exercise is safe following a concussion. Although early aerobic exercise may not always result in a decrease in symptom intensity and duration, it may help to improve the psychological state resulting from the social isolation of missing practices and school along with the cessation of exercise. Although treatments continue to be a major area of research following concussion, management should still consist of an interdisciplinary approach to individualized patient care. Strength of Recommendation: There is grade B evidence to support early controlled aerobic exercise may reduce the duration of symptoms following recovery while having little to no adverse events.

Open access

Kimmery Migel and Erik Wikstrom

Clinical Scenario: Approximately 30% of all first-time patients with LAS develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). CAI-associated impairments are thought to contribute to aberrant gait biomechanics, which increase the risk of subsequent ankle sprains and the development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Alternative modalities should be considered to improve gait biomechanics as impairment-based rehabilitation does not impact gait. Taping and bracing have been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent ankle sprains; however, their effects on CAI-associated gait biomechanics remain unknown. Clinical Question: Do ankle taping and bracing modify gait biomechanics in those with CAI? Summary of Key Findings: Three case-control studies assessed taping and bracing applications including kinesiotape, athletic tape, a flexible brace, and a semirigid brace. Kinesiotape decreased excessive inversion in early stance, whereas athletic taping decreased excessive inversion and plantar flexion in the swing phase and limited tibial external rotation in terminal stance. The flexible and semirigid brace increased dorsiflexion range of motion, and the semirigid brace limited plantar flexion range of motion at toe-off. Clinical Bottom Line: Taping and bracing acutely alter gait biomechanics in those with CAI. Strength of Recommendation: There is limited quality evidence (grade B) that taping and bracing can immediately alter gait biomechanics in patients with CAI.

Open access

Mohammadreza Pourahmadi, Hamid Hesarikia, Ali Ghanjal, and Alireza Shamsoddini

Context: Advent of smartphones has brought a wide range of clinical measurement applications (apps) within the reach of most clinicians. The vast majority of smartphones have numerous built-in sensors such as magnetometers, accelerometers, and gyroscopes that make the phone capable of measuring joint range of motion (ROM) and detecting joint positions. The iHandy Level app is a free app which has a visual display alike with the digital inclinometer in regard to numeric size. Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate available evidence in the literature to assess the psychometric properties (ie, reliability and validity) of the iHandy Level app in measuring lumbar spine ROM and lordosis. Methods: PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Ovid, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect were searched from inception to September 2018 for single-group repeated-measures studies reporting outcomes of lumbar spine ROM or lordosis in adult individuals without symptoms of low back pain (LBP) or patients with LBP. The quality of each included study was assessed using the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist. Results: A total of 4 studies with 273 participants were included. Two studies focused on measuring active lumbar spine ROM, and 2 studies evaluated lumbar spine lordosis. Three studies included asymptomatic subjects, and one study recruited patients with LBP. The results showed that the iHandy Level app has sufficient psychometric properties for measuring standing thoraco-lumbo-sacral flexion, extension, lateral flexion, isolated lumbar spine flexion ROM, and lumbar spine lordosis in asymptomatic subjects. One study reported poor concurrent validity with a bubble inclinometer (r = .19–.53), poor intrarater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .19–.39), and poor to good interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .24–.72) for the measurement of active lumbar spine ROM using the iHandy Level app in patients with LBP. Conclusions: This review provided a valuable summary of the research to date examining the psychometric properties of the iHandy Level app for measuring lumbar spine ROM and lordosis.

Open access

Scott W. Cheatham and Russell Baker

Context: Floss bands are a popular intervention used by sports medicine professionals to enhance myofascial function and mobility. The bands are often wrapped around a region of the body in an overlapping fashion (eg, 50%) and then tensioned by stretching the band to a desired length (eg, 50%). To date, no research has investigated the stretch force of the bands at different elongation lengths. Objective: The purpose of this clinical study was to quantify the Rockfloss® band stretch force at 6 different elongation lengths (ie, 25%–150%) for the 5.08- and 10.16-cm width bands. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University kinesiology laboratory. Participants: One trained researcher conducted all measurements. Procedures: The stretch force of a floss band was measured at 6 different elongation lengths with a force gauge. Main Outcome Measures: Band tension force at different band elongation lengths. Results: The stretch force values for the 5.08-cm width (2 in) were as follows: 25% = 13.53 (0.25) N, 50% = 24.57 (0.28) N, 75% = 36.18 (0.39) N, 100% = 45.89 (0.62) N, 125% = 54.68 (0.26) N, and 150% = 62.54 (0.40) N. The stretch force values for the 10.16-cm width (4 in) were as follows: 25% = 16.70 (0.35) N, 50% = 31.90 (0.52) N, 75% = 47.45 (0.44) N, 100% = 57.75 (0.24) N, 125% = 69.02 (0.28) N, and 150% = 81.10 (0.67) N. Both bandwidths demonstrated a linear increase in stretch force as the bands became longer. Conclusion: These values may help professionals to understand and document the tension force being applied at different lengths to produce a more beneficial application during treatment. Future research should determine how the different length/tensions effect the local myofascia, arterial, and vascular systems.

Open access

Gemma N. Parry, Lee C. Herrington, and Ian G. Horsley

Context: Muscular power output of the upper limb is a key aspect of athletic and sporting performance. Maximal power describes the ability to immediately produce power with maximal velocity at the point of release, impact, or takeoff, with research highlighting that the greater an athlete’s ability to produce maximal power, the greater the improvement in athletic performance. Despite the importance of upper-limb power for athletic performance, there is presently no gold-standard test for upper-limb force development performance. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the test–retest reliability of force plate–derived measures of the countermovement push-up in active males. Design: Test–retest design. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Participants: Physically active college athletes (age 24 [3] y, height 1.79 [0.08] m, body mass 81.7 [9.9] kg). Intervention: Subjects performed 3 repetitions of maximal effort countermovement push-up trials on Kistler force plates on 2 separate test occasions 7 days apart. Main Outcome Measures: Peak force, mean force, flight time, rate of force development, and impulse were analyzed from the force–time curve. Results: No significant differences between the 2 trial occasions were observed for any of the derived performance measures. Intraclass correlation coefficient and within-subject coefficient of variation calculations indicated performance measures to have moderate to very high reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .88–.98), coefficient of variation = 5.5%–14.1%). Smallest detectable difference for peak force (7.5%), mean force (8.6%), and rate of force development (11.2%) were small to moderate. Conclusion: Force platform–derived kinetic parameters of countermovement push-up are reliable measurements of power in college-level athletes.

Open access

Natalie Cook and Tamerah N. Hunt

Clinical Scenario: Concussions are severely underreported, with only 47.3% of high school athletes reporting their concussion. The belief was that athletes who were better educated on the signs and symptoms and potential dangers of concussion would be more likely to report. However, literature has shown inconsistent evidence on the efficacy of concussion education, improving reporting behaviors. Factors such as an athlete’s attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control have shown promise in predicting intention to report concussions in athletes. Focused Clinical Question: Do attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control influence adolescent athletes’ intention to report? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies (1 randomized control and 2 cross-sectional surveys) were included. Across the 3 studies, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control positively influenced athletes’ reporting intention. The studies found that attitude toward concussion reporting and perceived behavioral control were the most influential predictors of reporting intention. Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate evidence to suggest that positive attitudes, supportive subjective norms, and increased perceived behavioral control influence reporting intention in secondary school athletes. Strength of Recommendation: Grade B evidence exists that positive attitudes, supportive subjective norms, and increased perceived behavioral control positively influence concussion reporting intention in secondary school athletes.

Open access

Kaitlyn C. Jones, Evelyn C. Tocco, Ashley N. Marshall, Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, and Cailee E. Welch Bacon

Clinical Scenario: Low back pain is widely prevalent in the general population as well as in athletes. Therapeutic exercise is a low-risk and effective treatment option for chronic pain that can be utilized by all rehabilitation clinicians. However, therapeutic exercise alone does not address the psychosocial aspects that are associated with chronic low back pain. Pain education is the umbrella term utilized to encompass any type of education to the patient about their chronic pain. Therapeutic exercise in combination with pain education may allow for more well-rounded and effective treatment for patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (NS-LBP). Clinical Question: Does pain education combined with therapeutic exercise, compared with therapeutic exercise alone, improve patient pain in adults with chronic NS-LBP over a 2- to 3-month treatment period? Summary of Key Findings: A thorough literature review yielded 8 studies potentially relevant to the clinical question, and 3 studies that met the inclusion criteria were included. The 3 studies included reports that exercise therapy reduced symptoms. Two of the 3 included studies support the claim that exercise therapy reduces the symptoms of chronic NS-LBP when combined with pain education, whereas one study found no difference between pain education with therapeutic exercise. Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate evidence to support the use of pain education along with therapeutic exercise when attempting to reduce symptoms of pain and disability in patients with chronic NS-LBP. Educational interventions should be created to educate patients about the foundation of pain, and pain education should be implemented as a part of the clinician’s strategy for the rehabilitation of patients with chronic NS-LBP. Strength of Recommendation: Grade B evidence exists to support the use of patient education with therapeutic exercise for decreasing pain in patients with chronic NS-LBP.

Full access

Jessica St Aubin, Jennifer Volberding, and Jack Duffy

Clinical Question: How does early return to physical activity impact return-to-play recovery time in patients 5–30 years old after an acute concussion as compared to the current best practice of resting? Clinical Bottom Line: Based on the information gathered, there is moderate evidence to support the incorporation of light to moderate physical activity within 7 days after a concussion in order to decrease recovery time and symptoms.

Full access

Emily A. Hall, Dario Gonzalez, and Rebecca M. Lopez

Clinical Question: Does the medical model of organizational structure compared to either the academic or traditional models have a greater influence on job satisfaction and quality of life in collegiate athletic trainers? Clinical Bottom Line: Based on the quality of the person-oriented evidence available, the recommendation to adopt the medical model for athletic training staff would receive a Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT) grade of B.