Browse

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 35 items for :

  • International Sport Coaching Journal x
  • Physical Education and Coaching x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All
Free access

Erratum. Exploring Virtual Coach Education in USA Lacrosse

International Sport Coaching Journal

Free access

A Self-Reflective Toolkit of Adult-Oriented Coaching Practices in Masters Sport

Bettina Callary, Catalina Belalcazar, Scott Rathwell, and Bradley W. Young

The Adult-Oriented Sport Coaching Survey (AOSCS) assesses psychosocial coaching practices for coaches who work with adult athletes. The AOSCS can be used as a self-assessment tool for coaches’ professional development, but there is a need to better understand its relevance for coaches. The purpose of this study was to explore coaches’ perspectives of the AOSCS as a self-assessment tool for reflecting, intuitively appraising, and provoking elaborations on contextually embedded psychosocial practices when coaching adult athletes. Thirteen Canadian coaches (nine women/four men, aged 59–78 years) completed the AOSCS prior to watching a webinar regarding the research on coaching Masters athletes and the development of the AOSCS. Each was subsequently shared a copy of their AOSCS results and interviewed about their perceptions of the relevance and utility of the AOSCS. Interviews were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis, which resulted in three higher order themes (relevance of the AOSCS, using the AOSCS, and input from others) with six subthemes. The coaches see the AOSCS as provoking meaningful coach reflection, introspection, and learning intrapersonal coaching knowledge that serve ongoing coach development. As such, this paper outlines evidence with respect to the prospective relevance and practical utility of the AOSCS.

Free access

Erratum. Mental Health Literacy Workshop for Youth Sport Coaches: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study

International Sport Coaching Journal

Open access

Acknowledgments

Open access

Celebrating 10 Years of Sport Coaching Research Publications: Past Context and Future Directions

Bettina Callary

Open access

Reviewing Original Research Articles Published in the International Sport Coaching Journal

Katherine E. Hirsch, Todd M. Loughead, Gordon A. Bloom, and Wade D. Gilbert

The purpose of this commentary is to provide a broad overview of the empirical research-based articles published in the International Sport Coaching Journal from its inception in 2014 through 2020. Data from 101 publications were collected and analyzed using Arksey and O’Malley’s six-stage framework for conducting scoping reviews. Data were extracted on the size and scope of research, populations and perspectives studied, and methodologies and data collection methods used. The results show that empirical research publications grew more prominent over time (i.e., 24.0% of 2014 publications vs. 58.1% of 2020 publications) compared with other publication types. The most commonly researched topics included coach development and coach behaviors. The participants most studied were male coaches, performance sport coaches, and adult sport coaches, featuring primarily European and North American coaches. The majority of studies used a qualitative methodology with the most common research designs being phenomenological and case studies. A variety of data collection methods were used that involved one-on-one interviews and questionnaires. Several recommendations are advanced to stakeholders, including strategies to promote racial and gender diversity and to collect and report demographic data on race and coaching experience.

Free access

Coaches’ Perspectives of the Continuing Coach Education Program in the Development of Quality Coach Education in Singapore

Li Quan Warrick Tan and Donna O’Connor

Continuing professional development is considered essential to the improvement of sport coaching standards through the development of coaches’ knowledge. To support continuing professional development participation and learning for Singapore coaches, the Continuing Coach Education (CCE) program was introduced by Sport Singapore. The present study examined the influence of the Continuing Coach Education program on Level 1 Singapore-based coaches registered under the National Registry of Coaches. Utilizing an explanatory sequential quantitative–qualitative mixed methods approach to enhance understanding of participants’ perceptions, National Registry of Coaches Level 1 coaches completed an online questionnaire (n = 124) and participated in a semistructured interview (n = 7). Results revealed: (a) that intrapersonal knowledge was valued over professional and interpersonal knowledge; (b) that holistic development with an emphasis on character development of athletes was valued; (c) coaches’ key learning needs (i.e., sport psychology, use of technology in coaching, and career planning and development); (d) a preference to experience various learning sources (i.e., collaborative, experientially driven, recognized mediated, and internal unmediated), specific learning sources (i.e., self-directed and guided experiential), and improved coach developer facilitation; and (e) main learning motivations (i.e., meeting requirements and content relevance) and barriers (i.e., time and cost). Possible strategies to promote continuing professional development participation and learning for coaches practicing in similar contexts are discussed.

Open access

Engaging in Paradigmatic Dialogue: A Bibliometric Analysis of Coaching Scholarship From 1970 to 2020

Sara Campbell, Joseph Mills, Obidiah Atkinson, Brian Gearity, Clayton Kuklick, and Bryan McCullick

Coaching scholarship (CS) sits at the intersection of multiple paradigms and disciplines. Despite the eclectic nature of the field, most scholars operate only within their preferred paradigm, which limits how coaching is conceptualized and practiced. To address this limitation, we used the dialectic stance to analyze bibliometric records of CS produced between 1970 and 2020 from both an interpretivist and poststructuralist perspective. Using Web of Science, we identified 2,522 coaching articles and organized the bibliometric data into a time-ordered matrix representing five decades of CS: (a) number of publications per year, (b) country of origin, (c) institution, (d) journal, (e) author, and (f) most cited articles. Two research groups analyzed the data concurrently and independently using their respective paradigm. Next, the two groups came together to engage in dialogue and discover areas of convergence and divergence. Through the paradigmatic dialogue, the interpretivist research group realized they were operating in a postpositivist paradigm. Nevertheless, both groups determined CS was heavily influenced by Western societies, sport psychology, and the topic of motivation. The postpositivists highlighted evolutionary trends in CS, while the poststructuralists elucidated relations of power, understudied problems, and the consequences of the dominant knowledge produced.

Open access

International Council for Coaching Excellence Position Statement “Professionalisation of Sport Coaching as a Global Process of Continuous Improvement”

Sergio Lara-Bercial, John Bales, Julian North, Ladislav Petrovic, and Guillermo Calvo

The contribution that sport coaches make to society has received growing recognition among policy-makers over the last decade. Sport coaching is no longer only associated with professional and Olympic sport, trophies, and medals, and it is regularly proposed as an activity that contributes to the development of individuals, communities, and societies. Unfortunately, sport coaching has also been associated with negative outcomes, such as institutionalized doping, abuse of athletes, and match fixing. The level of scrutiny and expectations on coaches are higher than ever, and, therefore, more and more countries and sport organizations are examining how coaches are currently recruited, educated, developed, supported, employed, represented, and recognized. In the current landscape, the need to review the existing International Council for Coaching Excellence position statement on “Sport Coaching as a Profession,” written in 2011, is paramount. The 2021 position statement takes into account policy, practice, and research developments over the last decade to propose a way forward for sport coaching over the next 10 years.

Open access

Acknowledgments