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Celebrating 10 Years of the Global Observatory for Physical Activity—GoPA!

Michael Pratt, Andrea Ramírez Varela, and Pedro C. Hallal

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Self-Reported Physical Activity and Mental Health Among Asylum Seekers in a Refugee Camp

Konstantinia Filippou, Florian Knappe, Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis, Ioannis D. Morres, Emmanouil Tzormpatzakis, Elsa Havas, Uwe Pühse, Yannis Theodorakis, and Markus Gerber

Background: Global forced displacement has been rising steeply since 2015 as a result of wars and human rights abuses. Forcibly displaced people are often exposed to physical and mental strain, which can cause traumatic experiences and poor mental health. Physical activity has been linked with better mental health, although such evidence is scarce among those populations. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships of self-reported physical activity and fitness with mental health indices among people residing in a refugee camp in Greece as asylum seekers. Methods: Participants were 151 individuals (76 women, 75 men; mean age 28.90 y) displaced from their homes for an average of 32.03 months. Among them, 67% were from Afghanistan and countries from southwest Asia, and 33% from sub-Saharan African countries. Participants completed self-report measures assessing physical activity, fitness, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and well-being. Results: High prevalence of mental health disorder symptoms and poor well-being were identified, with women and Asians showing poorer mental health. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety were related to perceived fitness, but not to self-reported physical activity. Regression analysis showed that perceived fitness (β: 0.34; 95% CI, 0.43 to 1.52) and low-intensity physical activity (β: 0.24; 95% CI, 0.001 to 0.009) significantly positively predicted well-being, showing small to medium effect. Conclusions: The findings provide useful insights regarding the link between physical activity and well-being; nevertheless, further research examining objectively measured physical activity is warranted to complement these data and further explore the associations between physical activity and mental health.

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Erratum. Comparison of High-Intensity Training Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training on Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Body Fat Percentage in Persons With Overweight or Obesity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

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Erratum. Pandemic-Related Life Events and Physical Inactivity During COVID-19 Among Israeli Adults: The Smoking and Lifestyles in Israel Study

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

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Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity Among Youth Living in Rural and Urban Canadian Communities: A Nationally Representative Cross-Sectional Study

Taru Manyanga, Nicole White, Larine Sluggett, Annie Duchesne, David Anekwe, and Chelsea Pelletier

Background: We used nationally representative data to explore associations among location of residence (rural/urban) and perceived barriers to physical activity (PA) in Canadian youth. Methods: We analyzed the 2017 Canadian Community Health Survey, Barriers to Physical Activity Rapid Response data for 12- to 17-year-old youth. Nine items from the survey assessing perceived barriers to PA were combined into 3 barrier domains: resources, motivational, and socioenvironmental. The likelihood of reporting barriers to PA based on rural–urban location was examined using survey-weighted binary logistic regression following a model fitting approach. Sociodemographic factors were modeled as covariates and tested in interaction with location. For each barrier domain, we derived the best-fitting model with fewest terms. Results: There were no location-specific effects related to reporting any barrier or motivation-related PA barriers. We found a sex by location interaction predicting the likelihood of reporting resource-related barriers. Rural boys were less likely to report resource-related barriers compared with urban boys (odds ratio [OR] = 0.42 [0.20, 0.88]). Rural girls were more likely to report resource-related barriers compared with boys (OR = 3.72 [1.66, 8.30]). Regarding socioenvironmental barriers, we observed a significant body mass index by location interaction demonstrating that rural youth with body mass index outside the “normal range” showed a higher likelihood of reporting socioenvironmental barriers compared with urban youth (OR = 2.38 [1.32, 4.30]). For urban youth, body mass index was unrelated to reporting socioenvironmental barriers (OR = 1.07 [0.67, 1.71]). Conclusion: PA barriers are not universal among Canadian youth. Our analyses highlight the importance of testing interactions in similar studies as well as considering key sociodemographic characteristics when designing interventions.

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Green Exercise as an Opportunity to Promote Equity in Physical Activity Engagement Across Diverse Populations

Iris Lesser, Cynthia Thomson, and Melissa Lem

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Where Are Czech Adolescents Active? The Patterns of Movement and Transport Behavior in Different Active Living Domains

Michal Vorlíček, Tom Stewart, Jan Dygrýn, Lukáš Rubín, Josef Mitáš, Jaroslav Burian, Scott Duncan, Jasper Schipperijn, and Michael Pratt

To understand the environmental determinants of physical activity (PA), precise spatial localization is crucial. This cross-sectional study focuses on the spatiotemporal distribution of PA among Czech adolescents (n = 171) using Global Positioning System loggers and accelerometers. The results showed that adolescents spent most of their time in sedentary behavior, with 57.2% and 58.5% of monitored time at home and school, respectively. The park and playground had the lowest proportion of sedentary behavior but also the lowest amount of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA). However, when considering the time spent in each domain, the highest proportion of MVPA was seen in publicly accessible playgrounds (13.3% of the time). Chi-square analysis showed that the relative distribution of different PA intensities did not differ across spatial domains. Based on these results, the authors propose 2 key strategies for increasing MVPA in adolescents: Increase the time spent in activity-supportive environments, such as parks and playgrounds, and design techniques to increase MVPA at home and school settings.

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Erratum. No or Low Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity: Focusing on the Least Active as an Additional Approach for Physical Activity Surveillance

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

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No or Low Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity: Focusing on the Least Active as an Additional Approach for Physical Activity Surveillance

Raphael H.O. Araujo, André O. Werneck, R. Glenn Weaver, Rafael M. Tassitano, Célia L. Szwarcwald, Gilmar M. Jesus, Deborah C. Malta, Javier Brazo-Sayavera, Grégore I. Mielke, Mark S. Tremblay, and Danilo R.P. Silva

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Promotion of Physical Activity by Québec Primary Care Physicians: What Has Changed in the Last Decade?

Suzanne Laberge, Véronique Gosselin, Kim Lestage, Miguel Chagnon, and Claude Guimond

Objective: This study aimed to assess the changes in the frequency of physical activity (PA) counseling and in the predictors of primary care PA promotion in Québec primary care physicians (PCPs) between 2010 and 2020. Methods: In 2010, we conducted a survey among Québec PCPs. Questions included: frequency of promoting PA to patients, perceived barriers, needs to improve PA promotion practice, frequency of PCPs’ PA practice, and sociodemographic information. In 2020, we took over the 2010 questionnaire to document the evolution of the PA promotion practice. Results: The proportion of PCPs discussing PA with their patients significantly increased (P < .05) in 2020 for the following health conditions: depression, low back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer; it declined (P < .05) for overweight patients, those with metabolic syndrome, and in primary prevention. Collaboration with PA professionals was the major need identified, and it increased in 2020. PCPs’ own practice of PA was a predictor of PA promotion in 2010 (odds ratio = 6.679; P < .001) and in 2020 (odds ratio  = 6.679; P < .001). In both 2010 and in 2020, older or more experienced PCPs were more likely to discuss PA with their patients without diagnosed diseases than younger ones or those with less experience. Conclusions: Over the last 10 years, there has been a significant increase in PCPs promoting PA in Québec; however, it has been mainly oriented toward secondary prevention. It is concerning that PA counseling in primary prevention has declined, notably among younger PCPs. The stronger claim for closer collaboration with kinesiologists suggests that PCPs are in favor of an interprofessional strategy, namely collaboration with PA specialists.