Browse

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 433 items for :

  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
  • Journal of Physical Activity and Health x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All
Free access

How Societal Forces of Change Are Transforming Youth Physical Activity Promotion in North America

Jacob Szeszulski, Jamie M. Faro, Rodney P. Joseph, Kevin Lanza, Lucie Lévesque, Courtney M. Monroe, Elsa A. Pérez-Paredes, Erica G. Soltero, and Rebecca E. Lee

Background: Climate change, increasing recognition of institutionalized discrimination, and the COVID-19 pandemic are large-scale, societal events (ie, forces of change) that affect the timing, settings, and modes of youth physical activity. Despite the impact that forces of change have on youth physical activity and physical activity environments, few studies consider how they affect physical activity promotion. Methods: The authors use 2 established frameworks, the ecological model of physical activity and the youth physical activity timing, how, and setting framework, to highlight changes in physical activity patterns of youth in North America that have resulted from contemporary forces of change. Results: North American countries—Canada, Mexico, and the United States—have faced similar but contextually different challenges for promoting physical activity in response to climate change, increasing recognition of institutionalized discrimination, and the COVID-19 pandemic. Innovative applications of implementation science, digital health technologies, and community-based participatory research methodologies may be practical for increasing and sustaining youth physical activity in response to these forces of change. Conclusions: Thoughtful synthesis of existing physical activity frameworks can help to guide the design and evaluation of new and existing physical activity initiatives. Researchers, practitioners, and policymakers are encouraged to carefully consider the intended and unintended consequences of actions designed to respond to forces of change.

Free access

Unseating the Sedentary Threat: A Vital Strategy for Curbing Cardiovascular Disease in Young Adults

Robert J. Kowalsky, Gregory J. Grosicki, Marco Meucci, Erik D. Hanson, Justin B. Moore, and Lee Stoner

Free access

Shaping Policy and Practice: Analyzing the Reach of Highly Cited and High Altmetrics Publications for Broader Impact on Physical Activity

Andrea Ramírez Varela, Natalicio Serrano, Juliana Mejía Grueso, Anita Nguyen, Deborah Salvo, Ross C. Brownson, Adrian Bauman, Rodrigo Reis, Pedro Hallal, and Michael Pratt

Background: A significant gap remains between the availability of physical activity (PA) evidence-based interventions and their application in real-world settings in policy and practice areas. This study aims to describe highly cited and high altmetrics publications in PA research and explore their impact on PA policy and practice. Methods: Mixed-methods sequential explanatory study including the identification and description of the top highly cited and high altmetrics PA publications from the last 10 years (including study design, population, type of PA study, number of citations, and altmetrics score), and interviews with key informants regarding research dissemination and implications on PA policy and practice. Results: When considering publication type, the most frequent highly cited publications were health consequences (40%, altmetrics = 42%), measurement/trends (23%, altmetrics = 10%), and correlates/determinants (21%, altmetrics = 26%) studies. They were predominantly cross-sectional (50%, altmetrics = 28%), systematic reviews (38%, altmetrics = 18%), and longitudinal studies (8%, altmetrics = 37%). All authors who participated in the interviews agreed that the most important factors in disseminating findings and influencing PA policy and practice were the published peer-reviewed manuscript itself, the reputation of the journal, the communication strategy, and the use of online platforms. Conclusions: To have a real-world influence on PA policy and practice, it is not enough to publish the results in scientific journals and participate in media outreach. To successfully involve policymakers and communities in appropriating the evidence and evaluating the extent to which these findings affect policy and practice outcomes, it is critical to lead co-creation, co-dissemination, advocacy, and capacity building efforts.

Free access

Erratum. Calling out for Change Makers to Move Beyond Disciplinary Perspectives

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

Free access

Erratum. Better Late Than Never?! Five Compelling Reasons for Putting Physical Activity in Low- and Middle-Income Countries High Up on the Public Health Research Agenda

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

Free access

Erratum. Science has no Borders, so Should Scientific Publishing: A Position Statement from the Journal of Physical Activity and Health

Journal of Physical Activity & Health

Free access

A Quick Guide for Becoming a Better Peer Reviewer

Ding Ding, Pedro C. Hallal, Loretta DiPietro, and Harold W. (Bill) Kohl III

Free access

Life Course Epidemiology Applied to Physical Activity Research

Gregore Iven Mielke, Ding Ding, Tracy Kolbe-Alexander, Esther van Sluijs, and Pedro C. Hallal

Open access

Ten-Year Changes in the Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors of Adults: An Analysis of the 2 Cross-Sectional Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Studies

Marina Christofoletti, Paul Collings, Marion Tharrey, Camille Perchoux, and Laurent Malisoux

Background: Monitoring population physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior over time is important to guide public health actions. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in PA and sedentary behavior of adult residents in Luxembourg over 10 years. We also investigated variations in change over time across sociodemographic subgroups. Methods: Two population-based cross-sectional studies of adults living in Luxembourg (Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg [ORISCAV-LUX] [2007–2008] and ORISCAV-LUX 2 [2016–2018]) were considered. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to investigate changes over time between the studies with regard to self-reported total PA (metabolic equivalent of task-min/week), PA levels (inactive/sufficiently active/highly active), total sitting time, recreational television viewing, and personal computer (PC) use outside of work (in minutes per day). Results: The ORISCAV-LUX study included 1318 participants and the ORISCAV-LUX 2 study involved 1477 participants; 573 adults took part in both studies. The proportion of participants categorized as highly active increased over time by 6.9%. Total PA (761 metabolic equivalent of task-min/wk), television viewing (12 min/d), and PC use outside of work (13 min/d) also increased, whereas the total sitting time decreased by 25 minutes per day. Variations in change over time were observed by sex, country of birth, education, employment status, and perceived financial difficulty. Conclusions: Over a 10-year period, PA increased and total sitting time decreased in adults living in Luxembourg. With regard to specific sedentary behaviors, television viewing, and PC use outside of work increased. Specific population subgroups will benefit the most from targeted efforts to increase PA and minimize sedentary behavior.

Free access

Erratum. Physical Activity and Its Association With Body Mass Index: A Cross-Sectional Analysis in Middle-Aged Adults From 4 Sub-Saharan African Countries

Journal of Physical Activity and Health