Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • The Sport Psychologist x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • Physical Education and Coaching x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All
Free access

Erratum. “Keep the Pace! You’ve Got This!”: The Content and Meaning of Impactful Crowd Encouragement at Mass Running Events

The Sport Psychologist

Open access

Self-Expectations, Socially Prescribed Expectations, and Wellness in 14- to 15-Year-Old Athletes, Ballet, and Music Students in Norwegian Talent Schools—An Interview Study

Annett Victoria Stornæs, Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Gunn Pettersen, Jan H. Rosenvinge, and Sanna M. Nordin-Bates

Talent-school settings may generate stress via demanding expectations. To investigate students representing Norway’s growing phenomenon of early adolescent talent schools, we interviewed twenty-seven 14- to15-year-old boys and girls about their experiences with self- and socially imposed expectations. Students were recruited from two sports schools (n = 14) and one school each with talent classes for ballet (n = 7) and music (n = 6). Using reflexive thematic analysis, we found four main themes representing the performers’ accounts of (a) self-oriented expectations of persistent hard work, evoking self-doubts, and never-give-up attitudes; (b) coaches’/teachers’ socially prescribed expectations, stimulating hard work, and pursuit of approval and opportunities; (c) parental expectations, reflected as helpful support, concerns of letting parents down, and negotiating independence; and (d) struggles with balancing expectations, reflected by demanding workloads, difficulties with prioritizing recovery, and ill-being. Early interventions targeting unhealthy self- and socially imposed expectations in high-expectation settings may be required to safeguard youth performers’ healthy development.

Open access

Erratum. “Keep the Pace! You’ve Got This!” The Content and Meaning of Impactful Crowd Encouragement at Mass Running Events

Open access

“Keep the Pace! You’ve Got This!”: The Content and Meaning of Impactful Crowd Encouragement at Mass Running Events

Sophie Gibbs-Nicholls, Alister McCormick, and Melissa Coyle

This study identified helpful and unhelpful encouragement at mass participation running events and explored the meaning that runners found in encouragement. First, 10 k and half-marathon postevent surveys differentiated instructional and motivational components of helpful and unhelpful support. Second, an inductive, reflexive thematic analysis of 14 interviews highlighted the reciprocal relationship between the crowd and runners, whereby quality of support was reflected in runners’ emotions and behavior. Participants drew pride in participation and belief from the crowd, and they wanted to “give back” through doing their best. Personal and authentic support was particularly valued. Although support was widely appreciated, at times it created a pressure to “perform.” As a novel intervention based on our combined findings, we recommend that crowds, event organizers, and psyching teams give encouragement “with IMPACT” (Instructional; Motivational; Personalized; Authentic; Confidence-building; Tailored to the distance). Crowds should also demonstrate the “core conditions” of authenticity, empathy, and being nonjudgmental within their encouragement.

Open access

“As Many as Possible for as Long as Possible”—A Case Study of a Soccer Team That Fosters Multiple Outcomes

Martin K. Erikstad, Bjørn Tore Johansen, Marius Johnsen, Tommy Haugen, and Jean Côté

The personal assets framework suggests that dynamic elements of (a) personal engagement in activities, (b) quality social dynamics, and (c) appropriate settings will influence an athlete’s long-term outcomes of performance, personal development, and continued participation in sport. The aim of the present study was to conduct a case study of a Norwegian age-restricted team that was successful in promoting participation, performance, and positive development for individual participants and to investigate how the dynamic elements of activities, social dynamics, and settings have led to these long-term outcomes. The results indicated that the case is a best-practice example of successful attainment of personal development and long-term participation and performance through appropriate structure and application of the dynamic elements within the personal assets framework, including enjoyable peer-led play activities and quality practice, quality relationships with teammates and coaches, and access to facilities.

Full access

Erratum: Taylor and Collins (2020)

Full access

Erratum

In the article by Benson AJ, Eys M, Surya M, et al., “Athletes’ Perceptions of Role Acceptance in Interdependent Sport Teams,” in The Sport Psychologist 27(3), the abstract was not included in the final published version. We apologize for this error. The online version had been corrected to include the abstract: http://journals.humankinetics.com/tsp-current-issue/tsp-volume-27-issue-3-september/athletesrsquo-perceptions-of-role-acceptance-ininterdependent-sport-teams. The full abstract is also provided below.

The purpose of the present study was to gain insight into athletes’ perceptions of role acceptance. Semistructured interviews with 15 male and female intercollegiate athletes from a variety of interdependent sport teams were conducted, followed by interviews with 4 additional athletes recruited for the purpose of verification. Clear trends regarding role acceptance emerged. Athletes suggested that perceptions of leadership, team cohesion, intrateam communication, and other role-related variables influenced role acceptance. Further, the consequences of role acceptance were important in context of both the group environment and individual outcomes. Implications pertaining to role acceptance as a group construct are discussed.

Full access

Editorial

Edited by Sheldon Hanton

Full access

Errata

In the article by Matthew A. Pain, Chris Harwood, and Rich Anderson titled “Pre-Competition Imagery and Music: The Impact on Flow and Performance in Competitive Soccer” appearing in TSP 25(1) June 2011, the first line of the abstract should read “This article describes an intervention on the precompetition routines of soccer players during a 19-week phase of a competitive season.” We regret the error.

Full access

A Note from the Editor

Ian Maynard