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Erratum. Analyzing Dual-Task Paradigms to Improve Postconcussion Assessment and Management

Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

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Erratum. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Needle Electrolysis to Reduce Pain in Tendinopathies: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

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Forearm Posture Affects the Corticospinal Excitability of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Hand Muscles in Dominant and Nondominant Sides

Marco Antonio Cavalcanti Garcia, Thiago Santos de Carvalho, Renan Hiroshi Matsuda, Oswaldo Baffa, Luis Aureliano Imbiriba, and Victor Hugo Souza

Different forearm postures can modulate corticospinal excitability. However, there is no consensus on whether handedness plays a role in such a mechanism. This study investigated the effects of 3 forearm postures (pronation, neutral, and supination) on the corticospinal excitability of muscles from the dominant and nondominant upper limbs. Surface electromyography was recorded from the abductor digiti minimi, flexor pollicis brevis, and flexor carpi radialis from both sides of 12 right-handed volunteers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses were applied to each muscle’s hotspot in both cerebral hemispheres. Motor-evoked potential peak-to-peak amplitude and latency and resting motor threshold were measured. The data were evaluated by analysis of variance. The level of significance was set at 5%. The resting motor threshold was similar for the 3 muscles and both sides. Motor-evoked potential peak-to-peak amplitude from flexor pollicis brevis was lower during supination, and the dominant upper limb latency was longer. The flexor carpi radialis presented lower motor-evoked potential peak-to-peak amplitudes for neutral and shorter latencies during supination. Abductor digiti minimi seemed not to be affected by posture or side. Different muscles from dominant and nondominant sides may undergo corticospinal modulation, even distally localized from a particular joint and under rest.

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Leveraging the Momentum

Luke Donovan

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Effectiveness of Percutaneous Needle Electrolysis to Reduce Pain in Tendinopathies: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

Matheus Hissa Lourenço Ferreira, Guilherme Augusto Santos Araujo, and Blanca De-La-Cruz-Torres

Context: Tendon injuries are common disorders in both workers and athletes, potentially impacting performance in both conditions. This is why the search for effective treatments is continuing. Objective(s): The objective of this study was to analyze whether the ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis technique may be considered a procedure to reduce pain caused by tendinosis. Evidence Acquisition: The search strategy included the PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, SciELO, and ScienceDirect up to the date of February 25, 2024. Randomized clinical trials that assessed pain caused by tendinosis using the Visual Analog Scale and Numeric Rating Scale were included. The studies were evaluated for quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2, and the evidence strength was assessed by the GRADEpro GDT. Evidence Synthesis: Out of the 534 studies found, 8 were included in the review. A random-effects meta-analysis and standardized mean differences (SMD) were conducted. The ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis proved to be effective in reducing pain caused by tendinosis in the overall outcome (SMD = −0.97; 95% CI, −1.26 to −0.68; I 2  = 58%; low certainty of evidence) and in the short-term (SMD = −0.83, 95% CI, −1.29 to −0.38; I 2  = 65%; low certainty of evidence), midterm (SMD = −1.28; 95% CI, −1.65 to −0.91; I 2  = 0%; moderate certainty of evidence), and long-term (SMD = −0.94; 95% CI, −1.62 to −0.26; I 2  = 71%; low certainty of evidence) subgroups. Conclusion(s): The application of the ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis technique for reducing pain caused by tendinosis appears to be effective. However, due to the heterogeneity found (partially explained), more studies are needed to define the appropriate dosimetry, specific populations that may benefit more from the technique, and possible adverse events.

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Feasibility and Preliminary Effectiveness of an Online Meditation Intervention in Young Adults With Concussion History

Christine E. Callahan, Kyla Z. Donnelly, Susan A. Gaylord, Keturah R. Faurot, J.D. DeFreese, Adam W. Kiefer, and Johna K. Register-Mihalik

Context: Mindfulness interventions (yoga, meditation) in traumatic brain injury populations show promising improvements in injury outcomes. However, most studies include all injury severities and use in-person, general programming lacking accessibility and specificity to the nuance of concussion. Therefore, this study investigated the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an online, concussion-focused meditation intervention among young adults with a concussion history. Design: Unblinded, single-arm, pilot intervention. Methods: Fifteen young adults aged 18 to 30 with a concussion history within the past 5 years completed 10 to 20 minutes per day of online, guided meditations for 6 weeks. Feasibility was assessed using the Feasibility of Intervention Measure. Concussion symptoms were measured using the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptom Questionnaire, perceived stress the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and mindfulness the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics described the study sample and determined intervention adherence and feasibility. Paired sample t tests were used to examine preintervention/postintervention changes in concussion symptoms, perceived stress, and mindfulness, with descriptive statistics further detailing significant t tests. Results: Fifteen participants were enrolled, and 12 completed the intervention. The majority completed 5+ days per week of the meditations, and Feasibility of Intervention Measure (17.4 [1.8]) scores indicated high feasibility. Concussion symptom severity significantly decreased after completing the meditation intervention (11.3 [10.3]) compared with before the intervention (24.5 [17.2]; t[11] = 3.0, P = .01). The number of concussion symptoms reported as worse than before their concussion significantly decreased after completing the meditation intervention (2.7 [3.9]) compared with before the intervention (8.0 [5.7]; t[11] = 3.7, P = .004). Postintervention, 83.33% (n = 10) reported lower concussion symptom severity, and 75.00% (n = 9) reported less concussion symptoms as a mild, moderate, or severe problem (ie, worse than before injury). Conclusions: Findings suggest positive adherence and feasibility of the meditation intervention, with the majority reporting concussion symptom improvement postintervention. Future research is necessary to expand these pilot findings into a large trial investigating concussion-specific meditation programming.

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Erratum. Effect of Mindful Sports Performance Enhancement in College Athletes for Reducing Sports-Caused Anxiety and Improving Self-Awareness: A Critically Appraised Topic

International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training

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Mindfulness and Psychological Inflexibility in Portuguese Adolescent Athletes: A Novel Framework for Understanding the Link Between Shame and Sports Anxiety

Sara Margarida Simões de Oliveira, Marina Isabel Vieira Antunes Cunha, António Fernando Boleto Rosado, Mariana Saraiva, and Cláudia Rute Carlos Ferreira

This study aimed to test a comprehensive model in adolescent athletes that explores the effect of shame on sports anxiety and whether psychological inflexibility and mindfulness influence this association. The sample study included 210 young Portuguese athletes from different competitive sports. The path analysis results confirmed the adequacy of the proposed model, which explained 49% of the variance in sports anxiety. Results demonstrated that athletes who experienced higher levels of shame tended to exhibit elevated levels of sports anxiety through lower levels of mindfulness and higher psychological inflexibility. The study offers new empirical data that may be relevant for clinical and sport psychology practitioners. These findings seem to underline the importance of addressing shame and, consequently, sports anxiety in adolescent athletes by developing greater psychological flexibility and, inherently, more mindfulness skills among adolescent athletes who are in a phase of their lives where sport can play a crucial role.

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Role of the Flexion Relaxation Phenomenon in the Analysis of Low Back Pain Risk in the Powerlifter: A Proof-of-Principle Study

Nicola Marotta, Alessandro de Sire, Isabella Bartalotta, Maria Sgro, Roberta Zito, Marco Invernizzi, Antonio Ammendolia, and Teresa Iona

Introduction: Unlike the most common training approaches for bodybuilding, powerlifting programs are generally based on maximum and submaximal loads, putting enormous stresses on the lumbar spine. The flexion relaxation phenomenon evaluation is a clinical tool used for low back pain (LBP) assessment. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the flexion relaxation phenomenon in the analysis of LBP in the powerlifters. Methods: Healthy professional powerlifters participated in the study. In fact, we divided the participants into a LBP-low-risk group and a LBP-high-risk group, based on a prior history of LBP. Outcome measures included flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) and trough surface electromyography collected during trunk maximum voluntary flexion; furthermore, during a bench press lifting, we measured the height of the arched back (ARCH), using a camera and the Kinovea video editing software, to consider a potential correlation with the risk of LBP. Results: We included a group of 18 male (aged 24–39 y) powerlifters of 93 kg category. We measured a nonsignificant mean difference of ARCH between low-risk LBP group and high-risk LBP subjects. Curiously, maximum voluntary flexions were both above the threshold of 3.2 μV; therefore, with an absence of appropriate myoelectric silence, on the contrary, the FRR ratios were higher than 9.5, considering the presence of the phenomenon, exclusively for the low-risk group. The lumbar arched back measurement data did not report any association with the LBP risk, regarding the maximum voluntary flexion value, and even more than the FRR there is a relationship with the presence or the absence of LBP risk. Conclusions: FRR could be considered as a useful parameter for studying the risk of LBP in powerlifting. The FRR index not only refers to the possible myoelectric silence of the lumbar muscles in trunk maximum forward flexion but also takes into account the energy value delivered by the lumbar muscles during the flexion. Furthermore, we can indicate that the size of the powerlifter ARCH may not be a determining factor in the occurrence of LBP.

Open access

Athletes’ Perspectives of the Classification System in Para Alpine Skiing for Those With Visual Impairment

Sara M. Douglas, Paul J. Kitchin, Andrew J. Jackson, Brendan T. Barrett, and Julie-Anne Little

This study explored the classification experiences and views of Para Alpine skiers with visual impairment. Data from 11  interviews were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis to generate three themes: Suitability—The skiers questioned the suitability of the visual measurements, testing environment, and the information they received regarding classification; Exclusivity—Skiers felt certain aspects of the system remain exclusive due to the restrictions of sport classes and lack of the athlete voice; and (Dis)trust—Skiers felt distrust in those implementing the system and in other athletes due to intentional misrepresentation. Speculation surrounding this resulted in the skiers’ feeling doubt in their own classification. While there is not a “one size fits all” approach to classification, understanding skiers’ experiences can be a vital first step and will help to guide future research into the evolution of this sport’s classification.