Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 946 items for :

  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All
Free access

Erratum. Proportion and Correlates of Children in the US-Affiliated Pacific Region Meeting Sleep, Screen Time, and Physical Activity Guidelines

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

Open access

“Now I Am Walking Toward Health”: A Qualitative Study About the Outcomes of Physical Activity Participation That Matter to Older Adults

Peter J. Young, Christine Wallsworth, Hitika Gosal, and Dawn C. Mackey

Background/Objectives: Randomized controlled trials that deliver physical activity interventions have demonstrated benefits for older adults across numerous health outcomes. However, too little attention has been directed to ensuring that such trials are measuring patient-relevant outcomes. To support outcome selection for future trials, the objective of this study was to understand what outcomes related to their physical activity participation older adults find important. Methods: We conducted 12 semistructured interviews with adults aged 65 years and older and analyzed interview transcripts with a reflexive thematic analysis. Results: Older adults desired diverse outcomes from their physical activity participation, ranging from generic (e.g., quality of life) to specific (e.g., leg strength). Relevant outcomes were classified under five themes: physical, clinical, social, psychological, and overarching, each with respective subthemes. Conclusions: The outcomes that older adults found important were plentiful and rooted in a desire to improve their quality of life. Some of the outcome themes have been reported frequently in past trials (e.g., physical), but others have not (e.g., social). Future researchers should be aware of, and responsive to, the priorities of older adults when designing trials and defining outcomes. Significance/Implications: This study will help to improve outcome selection for future trials of physical activity with older adults. In alignment with a patient-oriented research philosophy, this study will also ground future outcome selection in the priorities of older adults.

Open access

Follow the Arrows: Using a Co-Created Causal Loop Diagram to Explore Leverage Points to Strengthen Population Physical Activity Promotion in British Columbia, Canada

Lori Baugh Littlejohns, Geoffrey McKee, Drona Rasali, Daniel Naiman, Jennafer Mee, Tanya Osborne, Phuc Dang, Meghan Winters, Scott A. Lear, Diane Nelson, Steve McGinley, and Guy Faulkner

Background: Population physical activity promotion (PPAP) is one of the most effective noncommunicable disease prevention strategies, yet coordination is lacking around the world. Whole-of-system approaches and complex systems methods are called for to advance PPAP. This paper reports on a project which (1) used an Attributes Framework with system mapping (group model building and causal loop diagramming of feedback loops) and (2) identified potential leverage points to address the challenge of effective coordination of multisectoral PPAP in British Columbia. Methods: Key findings from stakeholder interviews and workshops described the current system for PPAP in terms of attributes and dimensions in the framework. These were translated into variables and used in group model building. Participants prioritized the importance of variables to address the coordination challenge and then created causal loop diagrams in 3 small groups. One collective causal loop diagram was created, and top priority variables and associated feedback loops were highlighted to explore potential leverage points. Results: Leverage points included the relationships and feedback loops among priority variables: political leadership, visible policy support and governance, connectivity for knowledge translation, collaborative multisector grants, multisector collaboration, and integrating co-benefits. Leveraging and altering “vicious” cyclical patterns to increase coordinated multisector PPAP are key. Conclusions: The Attributes Framework, group model building and causal loop diagrams, and emergent feedback loops were useful to explore potential leverage points to address the challenge of multisectoral coordination of PPAP. Future research could apply the same methods in other jurisdictions and compare and contrast resultant frameworks, variables, feedback loops, and leverage points.

Free access

Erratum. The Relationship Between Childhood Trauma, Exercise Addiction, Emotion Regulation Difficulties, and Basic Psychological Needs in Türkiye

Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology

Free access

Erratum. Predicting Accelerometer-Assessed Estimates of Adolescent’s Multidimensional Physical Activity: A Self-Determination Theory Approach

Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology

Free access

The 2022 Janus 2.0 Conference Papers: Introduction to the Special Issue

Kevin Andrew Richards, Kim C. Graber, and Amelia Mays Woods

Free access

Impacts of Developmental Coordination Disorder on Postural Control Mechanisms in Children and Early Adolescents

Sirine Guetiti, Geneviève Cadoret, Félix Chénier, and Mariève Blanchet

Several studies have demonstrated balance impairments in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, a recent meta-analysis reports that none of the existing studies investigated the entire construct of balance across the same postural task. It is unclear whether anticipatory postural adjustments before voluntary unperturbed leaning tasks are altered in DCD. Anticipatory postural adjustment’s impact on postural control and limits of stability as well as the contribution of proprioception in these mechanisms are also unknown. This study compared the center of pressure displacements of participants with DCD (n = 30) to typically developing participants (n = 20) (9–12 years old). Standing on an AMTI force plate, participants were asked to lean as far as possible forward, backward, rightward, and leftward in both natural and with eyes closed + foam conditions (eight separated trials). The statistical analysis revealed that the DCD group had larger anticipatory postural adjustments, maximal center of pressure excursion, and greater postural instabilities than the control group. The proprioceptive condition does not systematically influence postural performance in DCD. These deficits are, however, increased in mediolateral directions. These impairments could interfere with children’s performance during daily and physical activities and even negatively impact social inclusion.

Free access

Inhibition of Ironic Errors and Facilitation of Overcompensation Errors Under Pressure: An Investigation Including Perceived Weakness

Hiroki Nakamoto, Shoya Hashimoto, Mio Kamei, Munenori Murata, Sachi Ikudome, Kenta Karakida, and Yoshifumi Tanaka

The conflicting predictions of ironic process theory and the implicit overcompensation hypothesis have been presented as a framework to explain the characteristics of errors that occur when a certain behavior is prohibited. The former predicts that instructions prohibiting a particular behavior will increase the likelihood of an outcome that should be avoided (ironic error), whereas the latter predicts that the likelihood of an outcome opposite of that to be avoided (overcompensation error) will increase. We examined how these errors, which negatively affect performance, are influenced by pressure and perceived weakness. Participants performed a tennis-stroke task, aiming to hit a ball toward a target zone while avoiding a discouraged zone. The results indicate that pressure decreases the ironic errors but increases the overcompensation errors that occur when a particular behavior is discouraged, while an increase in perceived weakness induces random errors.

Free access

agcounts: An R Package to Calculate ActiGraph Activity Counts From Portable Accelerometers

Brian C. Helsel, Paul R. Hibbing, Robert N. Montgomery, Eric D. Vidoni, Lauren T. Ptomey, Jonathan Clutton, and Richard A. Washburn

Portable accelerometers are used to capture physical activity in free-living individuals with the ActiGraph being one of the most widely used device brands in physical activity and health research. Recently, in February 2022, ActiGraph published their activity count algorithm and released a Python package for generating activity counts from raw acceleration data for five generations of ActiGraph devices. The nonproprietary derivation of the ActiGraph count improved the transparency and interpretation of accelerometer device-measured physical activity, but the Python release of the count algorithm does not integrate with packages developed by the physical activity research community using the R Statistical Programming Language. In this technical note, we describe our efforts to create an R-based translation of ActiGraph’s Python package with additional extensions to make data processing easier and faster for end users. We call the resulting R package agcounts and provide an inside look at its key functionalities and extensions while discussing its prospective impacts on collaborative open-source software development in physical behavior research. We recommend that device manufacturers follow ActiGraph’s lead by providing open-source access to their data processing algorithms and encourage physical activity researchers to contribute to the further development and refinement of agcounts and other open-source software.

Open access

Interventions Based on Behavior Change Techniques to Encourage Physical Activity or Decrease Sedentary Behavior in Community-Dwelling Adults Aged 50–70: Systematic Review With Intervention Component Analysis

Saima Ahmed, Kimberly Lazo Green, Lisa McGarrigle, Annemarie Money, Neil Pendleton, and Chris Todd

Increasing physical activity (PA) and/or decreasing sedentary behaviors is important in the delay and prevention of long-term conditions. PA can help maintain function and independence and decrease the need for hospitalization/institutionalization. Activity rates often decline in later life resulting in a need for interventions that encourage uptake and adherence through the use of Behavior Change Techniques (BCTs). We conducted a systematic review of the evidence for interventions that included BCTs in community-dwelling adults with a mean age of 50–70. The review followed PRISMA guidelines. The interventions were psychosocial, nonpharmacological, and noninvasive interventions utilizing components based on BCTs that evaluated change in PA and/or sedentary behavior. Intervention Component Analysis (ICA) was used to synthesize effectiveness of intervention components. Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in this review. The mean sample age was 50–64. Thirteen BCTs were used across all studies, and the most commonly used techniques were goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and natural consequences. Seven intervention components linked with BCTs were found: personalized goal setting, tailored feedback from facilitators, on-site and postintervention support, education materials and resources, reinforcing change on behavior and attitudes, self-reported monitoring, and social connectedness. All components, except for social connectedness, were associated with improved health behavior and PA levels. The interventions that use BCTs have incorporated strategies that reinforce change in behavior and attitudes toward PA.