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Aashirwad Mahajan, Satish Mahajan, and Swanand Tilekar

The primary objective of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to study the feasibility (recruitment and retention rates) for interval training and sleep hygiene (SH) in adults aged above 60 years. Thirteen out of 46 screened individuals from a home for older adults in Shirdi (Maharashtra, India) were randomly assigned by permuted block randomization to either an interval training with SH group (n = 6) or an SH alone group (n = 7). The authors measured sleep with the S+ sleep monitor manufactured by ResMed (USA) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and quality of life with Short Form-12 health survey version 2. Interval training consisted of 8 weeks of stationary cycling, whereas SH consisted of lecture and handouts. Recruitment was 38.2%, retention was >80% for both the interventions, and there was one loss to follow-up in SH. Interval training and SH were feasible for older adults and supported a full-scale randomized controlled trial.

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Lyndel Hewitt, Anthony D. Okely, Rebecca M. Stanley, Marjika Batterham, and Dylan P. Cliff

Background: Tummy time is recommended by the World Health Organization as part of its global movement guidelines for infant physical activity. To enable objective measurement of tummy time, accelerometer wear and nonwear time requires validation. The purpose of this study was to validate GENEActiv wear and nonwear time for use in infants. Methods: The analysis was conducted on accelerometer data from 32 healthy infants (4–25 wk) wearing a GENEActiv (right hip) while completing a positioning protocol (3 min each position). Direct observation (video) was compared with the accelerometer data. The accelerometer data were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves to identify optimal cut points for second-by-second wear and nonwear time. Cut points (accelerometer data) were tested against direct observation to determine performance. Statistical analysis was conducted using leave-one-out validation and Bland–Altman plots. Results: Mean temperature (0.941) and z-axis (0.889) had the greatest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Cut points were 25.6°C (temperature) and −0.812g (z-axis) and had high sensitivity (0.84, 95% confidence interval, 0.838–0.842) and specificity (0.948, 95% confidence interval, 0.944–0.948). Conclusions: Analyzing GENEActiv data using temperature (>25.6°C) and z-axis (greater than −0.812g) cut points can be used to determine wear time among infants for the purpose of measuring tummy time.

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Benita J. Lalor, Jacqueline Tran, Shona L. Halson, Justin G. Kemp, and Stuart J. Cormack

Purpose: To determine the impact of the quality and quantity of sleep during an international flight on subsequent objective sleep characteristics, training and match-day load, self-reported well-being, and perceptions of jet lag of elite female cricketers during an International Cricket Council Women’s T20 World Cup. Methods: In-flight and tournament objective sleep characteristics of 11 elite female cricketers were assessed using activity monitors. Seated in business class, players traveled west from Melbourne, Australia, to Chennai, India. The outbound flight departed Melbourne at 3:30 AM with a stopover in Dubai for 2 hours. The arrival time in Chennai was 8:10 PM local time (1:40 AM in Melbourne). The total travel time was 19 hours 35 minutes. Perceptual ratings of jet lag, well-being, and training and competition load were collected. To determine the impact of in-flight sleep on tournament measures, a median split was used to create subsamples based on (1) in-flight sleep quantity and (2) in-flight sleep quality (2 groups: higher vs lower). Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the bivariate associations between sleep measures, self-reported well-being, perceptual measures of jet lag, and internal training and match-day load. Results: Mean duration and efficiency of in-flight sleep bouts were 4.72 hours and 87.45%, respectively. Aggregated in-flight sleep duration was 14.64 + 3.56 hours. Players with higher in-flight sleep efficiency reported higher ratings for fatigue (ie, lower perceived fatigue) during the tournament period. Tournament sleep duration was longer, and bed and wake times were earlier compared with habitual. Compared with other nights during the tournament, sleep duration was shorter following matches. Conclusions: Maximizing in-flight sleep quality and quantity appears to have implications for recovery and sleep exhibited during competition. Sleep duration was longer than habitual except for the night of a match, which suggests that T20 matches may disrupt sleep duration.

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Camilla H. Carlsen, David McGhie, Julia K. Baumgart, and Øyvind Sandbakk

Purpose: To compare peak work rate (WRpeak) and associated physiological and biomechanical performance-determining variables between flat and uphill cross-country (XC) sit-skiing. Methods: Fifteen able-bodied male XC skiers completed 2 test sessions, each comprising four 4-minute submaximal stages, followed by an incremental test to exhaustion and a verification test in a sit-ski on a roller-ski treadmill. The test sessions were counterbalanced by the incline, being either 0.5% (FLAT) or 5% (UPHILL). The authors compared WRpeak and peak oxygen uptake, as well as physiological variables, rating of perceived exertion, gross efficiency, and cycle characteristics at identical submaximal work rate, between FLAT and UPHILL. Results: In UPHILL, WRpeak was 35% higher compared to FLAT (P < .001), despite no difference in peak oxygen uptake (P = .9). The higher WRpeak in UPHILL was achieved through more work per cycle, which was enabled by the twice as long poling time, compared to FLAT (P < .001). Submaximal gross efficiency was 0.5 to 2 percentage points lower in FLAT compared to UPHILL (P < .001), with an increasing difference as work rate increased (P < .001). Neither cycle rate nor work per cycle differed between inclines when compared at identical submaximal work rate (P > .16). Conclusions: The longer poling times utilized in uphill XC sit-skiing enable more work per cycle and better gross efficiency, thereby allowing skiers to achieve a higher WRpeak compared to flat XC sit-skiing. However, the similar values of peak oxygen uptake between inclines indicate that XC sit-skiers can tax their cardiorespiratory capacity similarly in both conditions.

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William H. Gurton, Steve H. Faulkner, and Ruth M. James

Purpose: To examine whether an ecologically valid, intermittent, sprint-based warm-up strategy impacted the ergogenic capacity of individualized sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) ingestion on 4-km cycling time-trial (TT) performance. Methods: A total of 8 male cyclists attended 6 laboratory visits for familiarization, determination of time to peak blood bicarbonate, and 4 × 4-km cycling TTs. Experimental beverages were administered doubleblind. Treatments were conducted in a block-randomized, crossover order: intermittent warm-up + NaHCO3 (IWSB), intermittent warm-up + placebo, control warm-up + NaHCO3 (CWSB), and control warm-up + placebo (CWP). The intermittent warm-up comprised exercise corresponding to lactate threshold (5 min at 50%, 2 min at 60%, 2 min at 80%, 1 min at 100%, and 2 min at 50%) and 3 × 10-second maximal sprints. The control warm-up comprised 16.5 minutes cycling at 150 W. Participants ingested 0.3 g·kg body mass−1 NaHCO3 or 0.03 g·kg body mass−1 sodium chloride (placebo) in 5 mL·kg body mass−1 fluid (3:2, water and sugar-free orange squash). Paired t tests were conducted for TT performance. Hematological data (blood bicarbonate and blood lactate) and gastrointestinal discomfort were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: Performance was faster for CWSB versus IWSB (5.0 [6.1] s; P = .052) and CWP (5.8 [6.0] s; P = .03). Pre-TT bicarbonate concentration was elevated for CWSB versus IWSB (+9.3 mmol·L−1; P < .001) and CWP (+7.1 mmol·L−1; P < .001). Post-TT blood lactate concentration was elevated for CWSB versus CWP (+2.52 mmol·L−1; P = .022). Belching was exacerbated pre-warm-up for IWSB versus intermittent warm-up +placebo (P = .046) and CWP (P = .027). Conclusion: An intermittent, sprint-based warm-up mitigated the ergogenic benefits of NaHCO3 ingestion on 4-km cycling TT performance.

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Victor E. Ezeugwu, Piush J. Mandhane, Nevin Hammam, Jeffrey R. Brook, Sukhpreet K. Tamana, Stephen Hunter, Joyce Chikuma, Diana L. Lefebvre, Meghan B. Azad, Theo J. Moraes, Padmaja Subbarao, Allan B. Becker, Stuart E. Turvey, Andrei Rosu, Malcolm R. Sears, and Valerie Carson

Background: Movement behaviors (physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep) established in early childhood track into adulthood and interact to influence health outcomes. This study examined the associations between neighborhood characteristics and weather with movement behaviors in preschoolers. Methods: A subset of Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development birth cohort (n = 385, 50.6% boys) with valid movement behaviors data were enrolled at age 3 years and followed through to age 5 years. Objective measures of neighborhood characteristics were derived by ArcGIS software, and weather variables were derived from the Government of Canada weather website. Random forest and linear mixed models were used to examine predictors of movement behaviors. Cross-sectional analyses were stratified by age and season (winter and nonwinter). Results: Neighborhood safety, temperature, green space, and roads were important neighborhood characteristics for movement behaviors in 3- and 5-year-olds. An increase in temperature was associated with greater light physical activity longitudinally from age 3 to 5 years and also in the winter at age 5 years in stratified analysis. A higher percentage of expressways was associated with less nonwinter moderate to vigorous physical activity at age 3 years. Conclusions: Future initiatives to promote healthy movement behaviors in the early years should consider age differences, neighborhood characteristics, and season.

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Thomas Losnegard, Sondre Skarli, Joar Hansen, Stian Roterud, Ida S. Svendsen, Bent R. Rønnestad, and Gøran Paulsen

Purpose: Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) is a widely used tool to assess subjective perception of effort during exercise. The authors investigated between-subject variation and effect of exercise mode and sex on Borg RPE (6–20) in relation to heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), and capillary blood lactate concentrations. Methods: A total of 160 elite endurance athletes performed a submaximal and maximal test protocol either during cycling (n = 84, 37 women) or running (n = 76, 32 women). The submaximal test consisted of 4 to 7 progressive 5-minute steps within ∼50% to 85% of maximal VO2. For each step, steady-state HR, VO2, and capillary blood lactate concentrations were assessed and RPE reported. An incremental protocol to exhaustion was used to determine maximal VO2 and peak HR to provide relative (%) HR and VO2 values at submaximal work rates. Results: A strong relationship was found between RPE and %HR, %VO2, and capillary blood lactate concentrations (r = .80–.82, all Ps < .05). The between-subject coefficient of variation (SD/mean) for %HR and %VO2 decreased linearly with increased RPE, from ∼10% to 15% at RPE 8 to ∼5% at RPE 17. Compared with cycling, running induced a systematically higher %HR and %VO2 (∼2% and 5%, respectively, P < .05) with these differences being greater at lower intensities (RPE < 13). At the same RPE, women showed a trivial, but significantly higher %HR and %VO2 than men (<1%, P < .05). Conclusions: Among elite endurance athletes, exercise mode influenced RPE at a given %HR and %VO2, with greater differences at lower exercise intensities. Athletes should manage different tools to evaluate training based on intensity and duration of workouts.

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David H. Perrin

In this essay, I reflect on my life and academic career, detailing my childhood, family background, education, and those who influenced me to study physical education and athletic training. My higher education started with a small college experience that had a transformative impact on my intellectual curiosity, leading to graduate degrees and, ultimately, a career in higher education. I chronicle my academic career trajectory as a non-tenure-track faculty member and clinician, tenured faculty member, department chair, dean, and provost. My personal and professional lives have been undergirded by a commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion, with examples provided in this essay.

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Nathalie Berninger, Gill ten Hoor, Guy Plasqui, and Rik Crutzen

Purpose : Physical activity (PA) is crucial for health, but there is insufficient evidence about PA patterns and their operationalization. The authors developed two algorithms (SPORTconstant and SPORTlinear) to quantify PA patterns and check whether pattern information yields additional explained variance (compared with a compositional data approach [CoDA]). Methods : To measure PA, 397 (218 females) adolescents with a mean age of 12.4 (SD = 0.6) years wore an ActiGraph on their lower back for 1 week. The SPORT algorithms are based on a running value, each day starting with 0 and minutely adapting depending on the behavior being performed. The authors used linear regression models with a behavior-dependent constant (SPORTconstant) and a function of time-in-bout (SPORTlinear) as predictors and body mass index z scores (BMIz) and fat mass percentages (%FM) as exemplary outcomes. For generalizability, the models were validated using five-fold cross-validation where data were split up in five groups, and each of them was a test data set in one of five iterations. Results : The CoDA and the SPORTconstant models explained low variance in BMIz (2% and 1%) and low to moderate variance in %FM (both 5%). The variance being explained by the SPORTlinear models was 6% (BMIz) and 9% (%FM), which was significantly more than the CoDA models (p < .001) according to likelihood ratio tests. Conclusion : Among this group of adolescents, SPORTlinear explained more variance of BMIz and %FM than CoDA. These results suggest a way to enable research about PA patterns. Future research should apply the SPORTlinear algorithm in other target groups and with other health outcomes.

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Jillian J. Haszard, Tessa Scott, Claire Smith, and Meredith C. Peddie

Short sleep duration is associated with poorer outcomes for adolescents; however, sleep duration is often assessed (either by questionnaire or device) using self-reported bedtime (i.e., the time a person goes to bed). With sedentary activities, such as screen time, being common presleep in-bed behaviors, the use of “bedtime” may introduce error to the estimates of sleep duration. It has been proposed that self-reported “shuteye time” (i.e., the time a person starts trying to go to sleep) is used instead of bedtime. This study aimed to compare the bedtimes and shuteye times of a sample of 15- to 18-year-old female adolescents recruited from 13 high schools across New Zealand. The influence on sleep duration estimates and associations with healthy lifestyle habits was also examined. Sleep data were collected from 136 participants using actigraphy and self-report. On average, 52 min (95% confidence interval [43, 60] min) of sedentary time was misclassified as sleep when bedtime was used instead of shuteye time with actigraph data. Mean bedtimes on weekdays and weekends were 9:56 p.m. (SD = 58 min) and 10:40 p.m. (SD = 77 min), respectively. The relationship between bedtime and shuteye time was not linear—indicating that bedtime cannot be used as a proxy for shuteye time. Earlier shuteye times were more strongly associated with meeting fruit and vegetable intake and sleep and physical activity guidelines than earlier bedtimes. Using bedtime instead of shuteye time to estimate sleep duration may introduce substantial error to estimates of both sleep and sedentary time.