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Sarah Labudek, Lena Fleig, Carl-Philipp Jansen, Franziska Kramer-Gmeiner, Corinna Nerz, Clemens Becker, Jochen Klenk, and Michael Schwenk

This study examined the applicability of the health action process approach (HAPA) to walking duration in older adults and the added value of extending the HAPA by intrinsic motivation. Self-reports from older adults (N = 309; M age = 78.7, 70–95 years) regarding activity-related intrinsic motivation and HAPA variables were collected at the baseline of a fall prevention intervention study. Walking duration at ≥3 metabolic equivalents of task was measured for 7 days via body-worn accelerometers. Two structural equation models with walking duration as a manifest outcome were specified. In both models, the model fit was acceptable, but intention and planning were not associated with walking duration. Intrinsic motivation was significantly related to most HAPA variables and walking duration. Variance explained for walking duration was R 2 = .14 in the HAPA and R 2 = .17 in the extended model. For explaining older adults’ walking duration, intrinsic motivation, but not HAPA-based intention and planning, seemed to be important.

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Manju Daniel, David Marquez, Diana Ingram, and Louis Fogg

Background: South Asian Indian immigrants residing in the United States are at high risk of cardiovascular disease (prevalence ≥35%), diabetes (prevalence 45.4%), and stroke (prevalence 26.5%). This study examined the effect of culturally relevant physical activity interventions on the improvement of physiological measures and average daily steps in at-risk midlife South Asian Indian immigrant women. Methods: In this 2-arm interventional research design, the dance (n = 25) and the motivational phone calls group (n = 25), attended social cognitive theory–based motivational workshops every 2 weeks for the first 12 weeks. Data for weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol level, and 12-lead electrocardiogram were collected at the baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. Results: Significant differences were seen in body weight (F 2,94 = 4.826, P = .024; ηp2=.093), waist circumference (F 2,92 = 7.496, P = .001; ηp2=.140), systolic blood pressure (F 2,94 = 19.865, P = .000; ηp2=.2970), triglyceride (F 2,94 = 11.111, P = .000; ηp2=.191), cholesterol (F 2,94 = 8.925, P = .001; ηp2=.160), blood sugar level (F 2,94 = 8.851, P = .000; ηp2=.158), and average daily steps across both intervention groups over time (F 2,96 = 30.94, P = .000; ηp2=.392). Conclusion: Culturally relevant motivational workshops with Indian dance and walking are an innovative approach to increasing lifestyle physical activity among South Asian Indian immigrant women.

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Myles W. O’Brien, William R. Wojcik, and Jonathon R. Fowles

Wearable physical activity monitors are associated with an increase in user’s habitual physical activity levels. Most of the older adult population do not meet the national moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) recommendations and may benefit from being prescribed a physical activity monitor. The PiezoRx is a class one medical grade device that uses step rate thresholds to measure MVPA. The validity and reliability of the PiezoRx in measuring MVPA has yet to be determined in older persons. We assessed the validity and interinstrument reliability of the PiezoRx to measure steps and MVPA in older adults. Participants (n = 19; 68.8 ± 2.3 years) wore an Omron HJ-320 pedometer, ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer, and four PiezoRx monitors during a five-stage treadmill walking protocol. The PiezoRx devices were set at moderate physical activity and vigorous physical activity step rate thresholds (steps per minute) of 100/120, 110/130, adjusted for height and adjusted for height + fitness. The PiezoRx exhibited a stronger correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient = .82) with manually counted steps than the ActiGraph (intraclass correlation coefficient = .53) and Omron (intraclass correlation coefficient = .54) and had a low absolute percentage error (3 ± 6%). The PiezoRx with moderate physical activity/vigorous physical activity step thresholds adjusted to 110/130 was strongly correlated to indirect calorimetry (0.84, p < .001) and best distinguished each walking stage as MVPA or not (sensitivity: 88%; specificity: 95%). The PiezoRx monitor is a valid and reliable measure of step count and MVPA among older adults. The device’s ability to measure MVPA in absolute terms was improved when step rate thresholds for moderate physical activity/vigorous physical activity were increased to 110/130 steps per minute in this population.

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Andrea Ramírez Varela and Michael Pratt

In 2012, the Global Observatory for Physical Activity (GoPA!) was established to provide information that would enable countries to initiate or improve research capacity, surveillance systems, program development, and policymaking to increase physical activity levels. Findings from the first GoPA! Country Cards showed an unequal distribution of physical activity surveillance, research productivity, and policy development and implementation around the world. Regular global monitoring of these factors, especially in countries with the largest data gaps, was recommended to combat the global pandemic of physical inactivity. After 6 years and using standardized methods, GoPA! is launching the second set of Country Cards based on data up to 2019 from 217 countries. Overall results showed that periodic national surveillance of physical activity was less common in low-income countries, compared with middle- and high-income countries. Large inequities were seen with more than a 50-fold difference in publications between high- and low-income countries and 32% of the countries worldwide had no physical activity policy. GoPA! has a critical role in facilitating evidence-based physical activity promotion building on international guidelines and the World Health Organization Global Action Plan. GoPA! will continue to monitor progress as we battle the global pandemic of physical inactivity.

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Ja’mese V. Booth, Sarah E. Messiah, Eric Hansen, Maria I. Nardi, Emily Hawver, Hersila H. Patel, Hannah Kling, Deidre Okeke, and Emily M. D’Agostino

Background: Only 24% of US youth meet physical activity recommendations set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Research demonstrates that community-based programs provide underresourced minority youth with opportunities for routine physical activity, although limited work draws from accelerometry data. This study objectively assessed youth physical activity attributable to participation (vs nonparticipation) days in a park-based afterschool program in Miami-Dade County, Miami, FL. Methods: Participants’ (n = 66; 60% male; 57% white Hispanic, 25% non-Hispanic black, 14% Black Hispanic, mean age = 10.2 y) physical activity was assessed April to May 2019 over 10 days across 7 park sites using Fitbit (Charge 2) devices. Separate repeated-measures multilevel models were developed to assess the relationship between program daily attendance and total (1) moderate to vigorous physical activity minutes and (2) step counts per day. Results: Models adjusted for individual-level age, sex, race/ethnicity, poverty, and clustering by park showed significantly higher moderate to vigorous physical activity minutes (β = 25.33 more minutes per day; 95% confidence interval, 7.0 to 43.7, P < .01) and step counts (β = 4067.8 more steps per day; 95% confidence interval, 3171.8 to 4963.8, P < .001) on days when youth did versus did not attend the program. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that park-based programs may support underserved youth in achieving daily physical activity recommendations.