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Mitchell J. Henderson, Bryna C.R. Chrismas, Christopher J. Stevens, Andrew Novak, Job Fransen, Aaron J. Coutts, and Lee Taylor

Purpose: To determine whether elite female rugby sevens players are exposed to core temperatures (Tc) during training in the heat that replicate the temperate match demands previously reported and to investigate whether additional clothing worn during a hot training session meaningfully increases the heat load experienced. Methods: A randomized parallel-group study design was employed, with all players completing the same approximately 70-minute training session (27.5°C–34.8°C wet bulb globe temperature) and wearing a standardized training ensemble (synthetic rugby shorts and training tee [control (CON); n = 8]) or additional clothing (standardized training ensemble plus compression garments and full tracksuit [additional clothing (AC); n = 6]). Groupwise differences in Tc, sweat rate, GPS-measured external locomotive output, rating of perceived exertion, and perceptual thermal load were compared. Results: Mean (P = .006, ηp2=.88) and peak (P < .001, ηp2=.97) Tc were higher in AC compared with CON during the training session. There were no differences in external load (F 4,9 = 0.155, P = .956, Wilks Λ = 0.935, ηp2=.06) or sweat rate (P = .054, Cohen d = 1.09). A higher rating of perceived exertion (P = .016, Cohen d = 1.49) was observed in AC compared with CON. No exertional-heat-illness symptomology was reported in either group. Conclusions: Player Tc is similar between training performed in hot environments and match play in temperate conditions when involved for >6 minutes. Additional clothing is a viable and effective method to increase heat strain in female rugby sevens players without compromising training specificity or external locomotive capacity.

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Kay Winkert, Johannes Kirsten, Rupert Kamnig, Jürgen M. Steinacker, and Gunnar Treff

Purpose: Automated metabolic analyzers are frequently utilized to measure maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max). However, in portable devices, the results may be influenced by the analyzer’s technological approach, being either breath-by-breath (BBB) or dynamic micro mixing chamber mode (DMC). The portable metabolic analyzer K5 (COSMED, Rome, Italy) provides both technologies within one device, and the authors aimed to evaluate differences in V˙O2max between modes in endurance athletes. Methods: Sixteen trained male participants performed an incremental test to voluntary exhaustion on a cycle ergometer, while ventilation and gas exchange were measured by 2 structurally identical COSMED K5 metabolic analyzers synchronously, one operating in BBB and the other in DMC mode. Except for the flow signal, which was measured by 1 sensor and transmitted to both devices, the devices operated independently. V˙O2max was defined as the highest 30-second average. Results: V˙O2max and V˙CO2@V˙O2max were significantly lower in BBB compared with DMC mode (−4.44% and −2.71%), with effect sizes being large to moderate (ES, Cohen d = 0.82 and 1.87). Small differences were obtained for respiratory frequency (0.94%, ES = 0.36), minute ventilation (0.29%, ES = 0.20), and respiratory exchange ratio (1.74%, ES = 0.57). Conclusion: V˙O2max was substantially lower in BBB than in DMC mode. Considering previous studies that also indicated lower V˙O2 values in BBB at high intensities and a superior validity of the K5 in DMC mode, the authors conclude that the DMC mode should be selected to measure V˙O2max in athletes.

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Leah K. May, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith, and Stefanie A. Wind

Purpose : To determine the influence of an elementary methods course and early field experience on eight preservice teachers’ (PTs’) value orientations. Method : The theoretical perspective employed was occupational socialization. Data were collected with the short form of the value orientation inventory and five qualitative techniques (formal and informal interviews, nonparticipant observation, critical incidents, and stimulated recall). The value orientation inventory profiles for the instructor and PTs were visually inspected for similarities and changes. Analytic induction and constant comparison were employed to analyze the qualitative data. Results : Value orientations of PTs with teaching and moderate coaching orientations were influenced by the methods course and early field experience, while those of PTs with strong coaching orientations were not. Factors leading to this evolution were the curriculum model employed, the instructor, and PTs’ increased confidence and knowledge of students. Summary and Conclusions : The study highlights the importance of faculty facilitating reflection on connections between instructional models and value orientations and how these relate to PTs’ beliefs.

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Craig R. Denegar and Justina Gray

Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching of the hamstrings improves flexibility but requires assistance from a clinician or partner. The original intent of our work was to assess the efficacy of self-assisted PNF hamstring stretching using a commercially available device. The authors observed improved flexibility in the stretched leg and, to a lesser extent, in the contralateral leg. While this was at first simply interesting, the finding became clinically relevant in the subsequent application in the care of a patient with low-back pain with radiating pain. This report provides study data and describes the translation of study findings into the care of a patient in a clinical setting.

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Tomonari Takeshita, Hiroaki Noro, Keiichiro Hata, Taira Yoshida, Tetsuo Fukunaga, and Toshio Yanagiya

The present study aimed to clarify the effect of the foot strike pattern on muscle–tendon behavior and kinetics of the gastrocnemius medialis during treadmill running. Seven male participants ran with 2 different foot strike patterns (forefoot strike [FFS] and rearfoot strike [RFS]), with a step frequency of 2.50 Hz and at a speed of 2.38 m/s for 45 seconds on a treadmill with an instrumented force platform. The fascicle behavior of gastrocnemius medialis was captured using a B-mode ultrasound system with a sampling rate of 75 Hz, and the mechanical work done and power exerted by the fascicle and tendon were calculated. At the initial contact, the fascicle length was significantly shorter in the FFS than in the RFS (P = .001). However, the fascicular velocity did not differ between strike patterns. Higher tendon stretch and recoil were observed in the FFS (P < .001 and P = .017, respectively) compared with the RFS. The fascicle in the positive phase performed the same mechanical work in both the FFS and RFS; however, the fascicle in the negative phase performed significantly greater work in the FFS than in the RFS (P = .001). RFS may be advantageous for requiring less muscular work and elastic energy in the series elastic element compared with the FFS.

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Adam Karg, Ali Tamaddoni, Heath McDonald, and Michael Ewing

Season ticket holders are a vital source of revenue for professional teams, but retention remains a perennial issue. Prior research has focused on broad variables, such as relationship tenure, game attendance frequency, and renewal intention, and has generally been limited to survey data with its attenuate problems. To advance this important research agenda, the present study analyzes team-supplied behavioral data to investigate and predict retention as a loyalty outcome for a single professional team over a 3-year period. Specifically, the authors embrace a broad range of loyalty measures and team performance to predict retention and employ novel data mining techniques to improve predictive accuracy.

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Irfan A. Khan and Kelley Henderson

Focused Clinical Question: What is the efficacy of structured foam rolling protocols at increasing hamstring muscle flexibility in active adults when compared with just maintaining regular levels of activity? Clinical Bottom Line: There is significant evidence to support the use of structured foam rolling programs in active adults to improve hamstring flexibility.

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Cristiano Dall’ Agnol, Tiago Turnes, and Ricardo Dantas De Lucas

Purpose: Cyclists may increase exercise intensity by prolonging exercise duration and/or shortening the recovery period during self-paced interval training, which could impact the time spent near V˙O2max. Thus, the main objective of this study was to compare the time spent near V˙O2max during 4 different self-paced interval training sessions. Methods: After an incremental test, 11 cyclists (mean [SD]: age = 34.4 [6.2] y; V˙O2max=55.7[7.4]mL·kg1·min1) performed in a randomized order 4 self-paced interval training sessions characterized by a work–recovery ratio of 4:1 or 2:1. Sessions comprised 4 repetitions of 4 minutes of cycling with 1 minute (4/1) or 2 minutes (4/2) of active recovery or 8 minutes of cycling with 2 minutes (8/2) or 4 minutes (8/4) of active recovery. Time spent at 90% to 94% (t90V˙O2max), ≥95% (t95V˙O2max), and 90% to 100% V˙O2max (tV˙O2max) was analyzed in absolute terms and relative to the total work duration. Power output, heart rate, blood lactate, and rating of perceived exertion were compared. Results: The 8/4 session provided higher absolute tV˙O2max and t95V˙O2max than 8/2 (P = .015 and .029) and 4/1 (P = .002 and .047). The 4/2 protocol elicited higher relative tV˙O2max (47.7% [26.9%]) and t95V˙O2max (23.5% [22.7%]) than 4/1 (P = .015 and .028) and 8/2 (P < .01). Session 4/2 (275 [23] W) elicited greater mean power output (P < .01) than 4/1 (261 [27] W), 8/4 (250 [25] W), and 8/2 (234 [23] W). Conclusions: Self-paced interval training composed of 4-minute and 8-minute work periods efficiently elicit tV˙O2max, but protocols with a work–recovery ratio of 2:1 (ie, 4/2 and 8/4) could be prioritized to maximize tV˙O2max.

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Danica Janicijevic, Ivan Jukic, Jonathon Weakley, and Amador García-Ramos

Purpose: To compare the accuracy of nine 1-repetition maximum (1RM) prediction methods during the paused and touch-and-go bench press exercises performed in a Smith machine. Method: A total of 86 men performed 2 identical sessions (incremental loading test until reaching the 1RM followed by a set to failure) in a randomized order during the paused and touch-and-go bench press exercises. Individualized load–velocity relationships were modeled by linear and polynomial regression models considering 4 loads (45%–60%–75%–90% of 1RM) (multiple-point methods) and considering only 2 loads (45%–90% of 1RM) by a linear regression (2-point method). Three minimal velocity thresholds were used: the general velocity of 0.17 m·s−1 (general velocity of the 1RM [V1RM]), the velocity obtained when lifting the 1RM load (individual V1RM), and the velocity obtained during the last repetition of a set to failure. Results: The 1RM prediction methods were generally valid (range: r = .96–.99, standard error of the estimate = 2.8–4.9 kg or 4.6%–8.0% of 1RM). The multiple-point linear method (2.79 [2.29] kg) was more precise than the multiple-point polynomial method (3.54 [3.31] kg; P = .013), but no significant differences were observed when compared with the 2-point method (3.09 [2.66] kg, P = .136). The velocity of the last repetition of a set to failure (3.47 [2.97] kg) was significantly less precise than the individual V1RM (2.91 [2.75] kg, P = .009) and general V1RM (3.00 [2.65] kg, P = .010). Conclusions: Linear regression models and a general minimal velocity threshold of 0.17 m·s−1 should be recommended to obtain a quick and precise estimation of the 1RM during the bench press exercise performed in a Smith machine.

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C. Eric Heidorn, Brandon J. Dykstra, Cori A. Conner, and Anthony D. Mahon

Purpose: This study examined the physiological, perceptual, and performance effects of a 6% carbohydrate (CHO) drink during variable-intensity exercise (VIE) and a postexercise test in premenarchal girls. Methods: A total of 10 girls (10.4 [0.7] y) participated in the study. VO2peak was assessed, and the girls were familiarized with VIE and performance during the first visit. The trial order (CHO and placebo) was randomly assigned for subsequent visits. The drinks were given before VIE bouts and 1-minute performance (9 mL/kg total). Two 15-minute bouts of VIE were completed (10 repeated sequences of 20%, 55%, and 95% power at VO2peak and maximal sprints) before a 1-minute performance sprint. Results: The mean power, peak power, heart rate (HR), %HRpeak, and rating of perceived exertion during VIE did not differ between trials. However, the peak power decreased, and the rating of perceived exertion increased from the first to the second bout. During the 1-minute performance, there were no differences between the trial (CHO vs placebo) for HR (190 [9] vs 189 [9] bpm), %HRpeak (97.0% [3.2%] vs 96.6% [3.0%]), rating of perceived exertion (7.8 [2.3] vs 8.1 [1.9]), peak power (238 [70] vs 235 [60] W), fatigue index (54.7% [10.0%] vs 55.9% [12.8%]), or total work (9.4 [2.6] vs 9.4 [2.1] kJ). Conclusion: CHO supplementation did not alter physiological, perceptual, or performance responses during 30 minutes of VIE or postexercise sprint performance in premenarchal girls.