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A. Dallaway, J. Hattersley, J. Tallis, D. Renshaw, C. Griffen, and M. Duncan

This study investigated age-related changes in trunk muscle function in healthy men and the moderating effect of physical activity. Twelve older (67.3 ± 6.0 years) and 12 younger (24.7 ± 3.1 years) men performed isokinetic trunk flexion and extension tests across a range of angular velocities (15°/s–180°/s) and contractile modes (concentric and eccentric). For concentric trunk extension, mixed-effects analysis of covariance revealed a significant interaction between Angular velocity × Age group (p = .026) controlling for physical activity. Follow-up univariate analysis of covariance revealed that the younger group produced significantly greater peak torque for all concentric extension conditions. Eccentric trunk strength was somewhat preserved in the older group. Age-related changes in trunk strength were independent of physical activity. The normal loss of trunk muscle strength in older age is muscle- and contractile-mode specific. These findings provide guidance for effective intervention strategies to offset adverse health outcomes related to trunk strength loss in older adults.

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Takahiro Ogawa, Yuki Sueyoshi, Shintaro Taketomi, and Nobumasa Chijiiwa

Age-related sarcopenia and osteoporosis-related fractures are critical health issues. Therefore, this study aimed to assess skeletal muscle mass changes in older patients with vertebral compression fractures undergoing rehabilitation and to evaluate factors associated with muscle increases. This study included 179 patients aged ≥80 years in rehabilitation wards with vertebral compression fractures. Appendicular skeletal muscle index was significantly higher at discharge (5.22 ± 1.04 kg/m2, p < .001) than on admission (5.03 ± 1.00 kg/m2). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that length of hospital stay was significantly associated with increased skeletal muscle index (odds ratios, 1.020; 95% confidence intervals [1.000, 1.032]), whereas age, sex, body mass index, functional independence measure, protein intake, and exercise therapy duration were not. Participants with vertebral compression fractures aged ≥80 years achieved significantly increased skeletal muscle mass in rehabilitation wards. In addition, length of hospital stay was the factor independently associated with increased skeletal muscle index.

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Wen-Yen Tseng, Ghazi Rekik, Chia-Hui Chen, Filipe M. Clemente, Pedro Bezerra, Zachary J. Crowley-McHattan, and Yung-Sheng Chen

Background: The psychological and physiological adaptations in response to the FIFA 11+ for kids (FIFA11+kid) program has not been examined in school children. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 8-week FIFA11+kid intervention on physical fitness and attentional capacity in elementary school children. Methods: A total of 55 elementary school students voluntarily participated in the study. Participants were assigned to either the FIFA11+kid (n = 28, 5 times per week) or the control (n = 27) group. At baseline and after 8 weeks, all participants were asked to perform a battery of physical fitness tests (sit-and-reach, broad jump, sit-up test, and 800-m run) and the Attention Scale for Elementary School Children, including 5 subscales: focused, sustained, selective, alternating, and divided attentions. Results: The FIFA11+kid group demonstrated larger pre–post change in sit-and-reach (P < .001) and sit-up test (P < .001) than that of control group. Moreover, the FIFA11+kid group demonstrated large improvements pre–post change in Attention Scale for Elementary School Children scores of total score (P < .001), focused (P < .001), sustained (P < .001), and selective attentions (P < .001) compared with the control group. Conclusion: A total of 8 weeks of FIFA11+kid exercise intervention can improve general physical fitness and attentional capacities in elementary school children.

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Margo E.K. Adam, Abimbola O. Eke, and Leah J. Ferguson

Self-compassion, an adaptive self-attitude, is a resource that women athletes use during emotionally difficult times and as a way to reach their potential. The relationship between self-compassion and sport performance, however, is complex. The role and experience of self-compassion within perceived important competitive events are important to explore, as athletes face unique pressures and stressors in these meaningful sport experiences. This collective case study describes women athletes’ self-compassion, sport performance perceptions, and well-being around a self-identified important competitive event. Competitive women athletes (N = 9) participated in two one-on-one interviews, before and after their important competitive event. Results from the holistic, functional, and thematic analyses are represented by holistic case descriptions and an overarching theme, Continuing to Excel in Sport, and subthemes, Reframing Criticism and A Determined Approach. In important competitive events, women athletes utilize self-compassion to promote performance perceptions and well-being when preparing, competing, and reflecting to excel in sport.

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Myungjin Jung, Heontae Kim, Seungho Ryu, and Minsoo Kang

Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate secular trends in domain-specific physical activity in the immigrant population in the US between 2009 and 2018. Method: A secondary data analysis from the 2009–2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; a total of 7282 immigrants in the US were included in this analysis. All domain-specific physical activity was assessed by a self-reported questionnaire. Tests for linear trends were performed to examine the trends of each physical activity time using orthogonal polynomial coefficients. Physical activity trends were assessed by the whole group and the various subgroups. Results: Total physical activity showed an upward linear trend in female (P trend = .04) and young adult (P trend = .009) immigrants. Work-related physical activity showed an upward linear trend in young adult immigrants (P trend = .01). Recreational physical activity showed an upward linear trend in young adult (P trend = .03) and Mexican American (P trend < .001) immigrants and in immigrants living in the US for 15–29 years (P trend = .02). In contrast, we observed downward linear trends in transit-related physical activity for immigrants across male (P trend = .04), middle-aged adult (P trend = .01), and non-Hispanic black groups (P trend = .004) and in immigrants living in the US for 15–29 years (P trend = .03). Conclusion: There were no significant linear trends in the 4 domains of physical activity in the overall US immigrant population; however, trends in domain-specific physical activity in the US immigrant population differed by gender, age, race/ethnicity, and length of residence. These findings may inform physical activity promotion strategies targeting US immigrant populations with diverse sociocultural backgrounds.

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Danielle S. Molnar, Melissa Blackburn, Dawn Zinga, Natalie Spadafora, Tabitha Methot-Jones, and Maureen Connolly

This study provided the first test of the 2 × 2 model of perfectionism with respect to dancers’ goals for dancing in competitive dance. Four hundred twenty-five young female North American competitive dancers (M = 11.33 years; SD = 2.14) completed questionnaires assessing multidimensional perfectionism and goals for participation in dance. The latent moderated structural equations approach along with procedures outlined by Gaudreau indicated partial support for the 2 × 2 model of perfectionism. Pure Evaluative Concerns Perfectionism was associated with fewer intrinsic goals for dance and greater extrinsic goals for dance relative to nonperfectionism. Pure Personal Standards Perfectionism was related to less endorsement of extrinsic goals relative to nonperfectionism. Findings were complex with respect to mixed perfectionism, with this form of perfectionism being related to greater endorsement of both intrinsic and extrinsic goals for dance. Results provide partial support for the 2 × 2 model in youth dance.