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Takuya Ibara, Makoto Takahashi, Koichi Shinkoda, Mahito Kawashima, and Masaya Anan

This study aimed to investigate the hip sway and the relationship between the center of pressure (CoP) and kinematic parameters regarding the time series scaling component α in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) during a one-leg standing task. The scaling exponent α, SD, hip sway maximal acceleration change, and balance performance, which was measured using CoP parameters, were compared between hip OA and control groups during a one-leg standing task. The relationships between balance performance with CoP parameters and kinematic parameters were investigated with the regression analysis. In the hip OA group, the scaling exponent α was smaller in the medial–lateral direction, and the SD and maximal amount of change in hip sway acceleration were larger in the anterior–posterior direction in the hip OA group. In this group, the CoP parameters were significantly associated with α in the medial–lateral direction (negatively) and in the anterior–posterior direction (positively). In the hip OA group, hip sway adaptability in the medial–lateral direction was limited, while the anterior–posterior direction showed greater movement.

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Gabriel Perri Esteves, Paul Swinton, Craig Sale, Ruth M. James, Guilherme Giannini Artioli, Hamilton Roschel, Bruno Gualano, Bryan Saunders, and Eimear Dolan

Currently, little is known about the extent of interindividual variability in response to beta-alanine (BA) supplementation, nor what proportion of said variability can be attributed to external factors or to the intervention itself (intervention response). To investigate this, individual participant data on the effect of BA supplementation on a high-intensity cycling capacity test (CCT110%) were meta-analyzed. Changes in time to exhaustion (TTE) and muscle carnosine were the primary and secondary outcomes. Multilevel distributional Bayesian models were used to estimate the mean and SD of BA and placebo group change scores. The relative sizes of group SDs were used to infer whether observed variation in change scores were due to intervention or non-intervention-related effects. Six eligible studies were identified, and individual data were obtained from four of these. Analyses showed a group effect of BA supplementation on TTE (7.7, 95% credible interval [CrI] [1.3, 14.3] s) and muscle carnosine (18.1, 95% CrI [14.5, 21.9] mmol/kg DM). A large intervention response variation was identified for muscle carnosine (σIR = 5.8, 95% CrI [4.2, 7.4] mmol/kg DM) while equivalent change score SDs were shown for TTE in both the placebo (16.1, 95% CrI [13.0, 21.3] s) and BA (15.9, 95% CrI [13.0, 20.0] s) conditions, with the probability that SD was greater in placebo being 0.64. In conclusion, the similarity in observed change score SDs between groups for TTE indicates the source of variation is common to both groups, and therefore unrelated to the supplement itself, likely originating instead from external factors such as nutritional intake, sleep patterns, or training status.

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Elliott C.R. Hall, Sandro S. Almeida, Shane M. Heffernan, Sarah J. Lockey, Adam J. Herbert, Peter Callus, Stephen H. Day, Charles R. Pedlar, Courtney Kipps, Malcolm Collins, Yannis P. Pitsiladis, Mark A. Bennett, Liam P. Kilduff, Georgina K. Stebbings, Robert M. Erskine, and Alun G. Williams

Purpose: Genetic polymorphisms have been associated with the adaptation to training in maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max). However, the genotype distribution of selected polymorphisms in athletic cohorts is unknown, with their influence on performance characteristics also undetermined. This study investigated whether the genotype distributions of 3 polymorphisms previously associated with V˙O2max training adaptation are associated with elite athlete status and performance characteristics in runners and rugby athletes, competitors for whom aerobic metabolism is important. Methods: Genomic DNA was collected from 732 men including 165 long-distance runners, 212 elite rugby union athletes, and 355 nonathletes. Genotype and allele frequencies of PRDM1 rs10499043 C/T, GRIN3A rs1535628 G/A, and KCNH8 rs4973706 T/C were compared between athletes and nonathletes. Personal-best marathon times in runners, as well as in-game performance variables and playing position, of rugby athletes were analyzed according to genotype. Results: Runners with PRDM1 T alleles recorded marathon times ∼3 minutes faster than CC homozygotes (02:27:55 [00:07:32] h vs 02:31:03 [00:08:24] h, P = .023). Rugby athletes had 1.57 times greater odds of possessing the KCNH8 TT genotype than nonathletes (65.5% vs 54.7%, χ 2 = 6.494, P = .013). No other associations were identified. Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate that polymorphisms previously associated with V˙O2max training adaptations in nonathletes are also associated with marathon performance (PRDM1) and elite rugby union status (KCNH8). The genotypes and alleles previously associated with superior endurance-training adaptation appear to be advantageous in long-distance running and achieving elite status in rugby union.

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Alexandru Nicolae Ungureanu, Corrado Lupo, Gennaro Boccia, and Paolo Riccardo Brustio

Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether the internal (session rating of perceived exertion [sRPE] and Edwards heart-rate-based method) and external training load (jumps) affect the presession well-being perception on the day after (ie, +22 h), according to age and tactical position, in elite (ie, Serie A2) female volleyball training. Methods: Ten female elite volleyball players (age = 23 [4] y, height = 1.82 [0.04] m, body mass = 73.2 [4.9] kg) had their heart rate monitored during 13 team (115 individual) training sessions (duration: 101 [8] min). Mixed-effect models were applied to evaluate whether sRPE, Edwards method, and jumps were correlated (P ≤ .05) to Hooper index factors (ie, perceived sleep quality/disorders, stress level, fatigue, and delayed-onset muscle soreness) in relation to age and tactical position (ie, hitters, central blockers, opposites, and setters). Results: The results showed a direct relationship between sRPE (P < .001) and presession well-being perception 22 hours apart, whereas the relationship was the inverse for Edwards method internal training load. Age, as well as the performed jumps, did not affect the well-being perception of the day after. Finally, central blockers experienced a higher delayed-onset muscle soreness than hitters (P = .003). Conclusions: Findings indicated that female volleyball players’ internal training load influences the pretraining well-being status on the day after (+ 22 h). Therefore, coaches can benefit from this information to accurately implement periodization in a short-term perspective and to properly adopt recovery strategies in relation to the players’ well-being status.

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Christian J. Cook, Blair T. Crewther, Liam P. Kilduff, Linda L. Agnew, Phillip Fourie, and Benjamin G. Serpell

Purpose: To establish if training volume was associated with androgen baselines and androgen responsiveness to acute exercise. Methods: During a “high-volume” training phase, 28 cyclists (14 men and 14 women) undertook oxygen-uptake and maximal-work-capacity testing. Two days later, they completed a repeat-sprint protocol, which was repeated 3 weeks later during a “low-volume” phase. Blood and saliva samples were collected before and after (+5 and +60 min) the repeat-sprint protocol. Blood was assayed for total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and saliva, for testosterone and DHT. Results: Pretrial TT, FT, and DHT concentration was greater for males (P < .001, large effect size differences), and in both genders TT, DHT, and saliva for DHT was higher during high-volume loading (moderate to large effect size). Area-under-the-curve analysis revealed larger TT, FT, and DHT responses to the repeat-sprint protocol among females, and high-volume training was linked to larger TT, DHT, and saliva for DHT responses (moderate to large effect size). Baseline TT and FT correlated with oxygen uptake and work capacity in both genders (P < .05). Conclusion: DHT showed no acute performance correlation but was responsive to volume of training, particularly in females. This work informs on timelines and relationships of androgenic biomarkers in males and females across different training loads, adding to the complexity that should be considered in interpretation thereof. The authors speculate that testosterone may impact acute performance via behavioral mechanisms of motivation and attention; DHT, via training volume-induced androgenic promotion, may facilitate long-term adaptive changes, especially for females.

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Ciaran O’Grady, Louis Passfield, and James G. Hopker

Purpose: Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) as a training-intensity prescription has been extensively used by athletes and coaches. However, individual variability in the physiological response to exercise prescribed using RPE has not been investigated. Methods: Twenty well-trained competitive cyclists (male = 18, female = 2, maximum oxygen consumption =55.07 [11.06] mL·kg−1·min−1) completed 3 exercise trials each consisting of 9 randomized self-paced exercise bouts of either 1, 4, or 8 minutes at RPEs of 9, 13, and 17. Within-athlete variability (WAV) and between-athletes variability (BAV) in power and physiological responses were calculated using the coefficient of variation. Total variability was calculated as the ratio of WAV to BAV. Results: Increased RPEs were associated with higher power, heart rate, work, volume of expired oxygen (VO2), volume of expired carbon dioxide (VCO2), minute ventilation (V E), deoxyhemoglobin (ΔHHb) (P < .001), and lower tissue saturation index (ΔTSI%) and ΔO2Hb (oxyhaemoglobin; P < .001). At an RPE of 9, shorter durations resulted in lower VO2 (P < .05) and decreased ΔTSI%, and the ΔHHb increased as the duration increased (P < .05). At an RPE of 13, shorter durations resulted in lower VO2, V E, and percentage of maximum oxygen consumption (P < .001), as well as higher power, heart rate, ΔHHb (P < .001), and ΔTSI% (P < .05). At an RPE of 17, power (P < .001) and ΔTSI% (P < .05) increased as duration decreased. As intensity and duration increased, WAV and BAV in power, work, heart rate, VO2, VCO2, and VE decreased, and WAV and BAV in near-infrared spectroscopy increased. Conclusions: Self-paced intensity prescriptions of high effort and long duration result in the greatest consistency on both a within- and between-athletes basis.

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Samantha M. Ross, Kathleen McCarty, Bridgette M. Schram, and Layne Case

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Kyle Pushkarenko, Janice Causgrove Dunn, and Donna L. Goodwin

Countering the declining physical activity patterns of children labeled with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has gained considerable research attention given its impact on health and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore how parents of children labeled with ASD understand the concept of physical literacy, based on their children’s participation in community-based physical activity programs. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, six mothers of children labeled with ASD participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews. The conceptual framework of ecological systems theory supported the rationale for the study purpose, provided structure for the interview guide, and offered a reflexive context for interpretation. Four themes were generated from the thematic analysis: From embodied movement to normative skill expectations, Be flexible, not rigid, Systematic exclusion, and Valuable? . . . Absolutely! Despite experiences of marginalization, exclusion, and trauma within physical activity programs, mothers valued physical literacy development for their children given the positive outcomes of increasing family connections, engagement with peers, and enhanced wellness.

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Noah Wexler, Yingling Fan, Kirti V. Das, and Simone French

Background: Neighborhood parks are important locations to encourage and stimulate physical activity (PA) among the urban population. This study aims to evaluate the impact of an informational intervention on adult park use and PA behaviors in 3 low-income, racially diverse urban neighborhoods in Minneapolis, MN. Method: The study employed a household-level randomized controlled trial and collected baseline and follow-up data from 171 participants. Within each neighborhood, participants were randomized to an informational intervention or to a no-intervention comparison. Intervention households received monthly, neighborhood-specific newsletters about park-based PA opportunities, park program brochures, trail maps, and activity guides. Results: The average treatment effect of the newsletter intervention was positive yet moderated by respondent age. For a 20-year-old resident, treatment was associated with 0.97 (P < .05) additional park visits and 31.24 (P < .05) additional minutes of park-based PA over a 3-day recall period. For 40-year-old respondents, these positive effects are smaller at 0.36 (P < .05) additional visits and 4.66 (P < .05) additional minutes, respectively. Conclusions: An intervention to increase awareness about park-based PA opportunities and benefits increased self-reported park visits and in-park PA among adults who lived in low-income, racially diverse neighborhoods.