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Eduardo L. Caputo and Felipe F. Reichert

Background: This scoping review aimed to identify the available evidence related to physical activity (PA) and the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods: A search in 6 databases (PubMed, Embase, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL) was conducted on July 23, 2020. Medical subject headings and keywords related to PA and COVID-19 were combined to conduct the online search, which covered the period from January to July 2020. Results: Overall, 1784 articles were retrieved. After duplicate removal and title, abstract, and full-text screening, 41 articles were included. Most of the included studies were quantitative and collected data through online interviews/questionnaires, with sample sizes larger than 100 and composed by adults and older adults. Changes in PA levels due to the COVID-19 pandemic were the most assessed outcome, followed by the association between mental health issues and PA. Only 2 studies assessed the direct effects of PA on COVID-19. Conclusion: Most of the evidence identified a decrease in PA levels due to social distancing measures and that PA might help to decrease the mental health burden related to the COVID-19 outbreak.

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Dechristian França Barbieri, Luiz Augusto Brusaca, Svend Erik Mathiassen and Ana Beatriz Oliveira

Background: Sit–stand desks have been suggested as an initiative to increase posture variation among office workers. However, there is limited evidence of what would be preferable combinations of time sitting and standing. The aim of this study was to determine and compare perceived pleasantness, acceptability, pain, and fatigue for 5 time patterns of sitting and standing at a sit–stand desk. Methods: Thirty postgraduate students were equally divided into a normal-weight (mean body mass index 22.8 kg/m2) and an overweight/obese (mean body mass index 28.1 kg/m2) group. They performed 3 hours of computer work at a sit–stand desk on 5 different days, each day with a different time pattern (A: 60-min sit/0-min stand; B: 50/10; C: 40/20; D: 30/30; E: 20/40). Pleasantness, acceptability, pain, and fatigue ratings were obtained at the beginning and at the end of the 3-hour period. Results: High ratings of pleasantness were observed for time patterns B, C, and D in both groups. All participants rated acceptability to be good for time patterns A to D. A minor increase in perceived fatigue and pain was observed in time pattern E. Conclusion: For new sit–stand desk users, regardless of body mass index, 10 to 30 minutes of standing per hour appears to be an amenable time pattern.