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Tyler N. Brown, AuraLea C. Fain, Kayla D. Seymore and Nicholas J. Lobb

This study determined changes in lower limb joint stiffness when running with body-borne load, and whether they differ with stride or sex. Twenty males and 16 females had joint stiffness quantified when running (4.0 m/s) with body-borne load (20, 25, 30, and 35 kg) and 3 stride lengths (preferred or 15% longer and shorter). Lower limb joint stiffness, flexion range of motion (RoM), and peak flexion moment were submitted to a mixed-model analysis of variance. Knee and ankle stiffness increased 19% and 6% with load (P < .001, P = .049), but decreased 8% and 6% as stride lengthened (P = .004, P < .001). Decreased knee RoM (P < .001, 0.9°–2.7°) and increased knee (P = .007, up to 0.12 N.m/kg.m) and ankle (P = .013, up to 0.03 N.m/kg.m) flexion moment may stiffen joints with load. Greater knee (P < .001, 4.7°–5.4°) and ankle (P < .001, 2.6°–7.2°) flexion RoM may increase joint compliance with longer strides. Females exhibited 15% stiffer knee (P = .025) from larger reductions in knee RoM (4.3°–5.4°) with load than males (P < .004). Stiffer lower limb joints may elevate injury risk while running with load, especially for females.

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Nicholas S. Ryan, Paul A. Bruno and John M. Barden

Studies have investigated the reliability and effect of walking speed on stride time variability during walking trials performed on a treadmill. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of stride time variability and the effect of walking speed on stride time variability, during continuous, overground walking in healthy young adults. Participants completed: (1) 2 walking trials at their preferred walking speed on 1 day and another trial 2 to 4 days later and (2) 1 trial at their preferred walking speed, 1 trial approximately 20% to 25% faster than their preferred walking speed, and 1 trial approximately 20% to 25% slower than their preferred walking speed on a separate day. Data from a waist-mounted accelerometer were used to determine the consecutive stride times for each trial. The reliability of stride time variability outcomes was generally poor (intraclass correlations: .167–.487). Although some significant differences in stride time variability were found between the preferred walking speed, fast, and slow trials, individual between-trial differences were generally below the estimated minimum difference considered to be a real difference. The development of a protocol to improve the reliability of stride time variability outcomes during continuous, overground walking would be beneficial to improve their application in research and clinical settings.

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Mengyun Luo, Philayrath Phongsavan, Adrian Bauman, Joel Negin, Zhiruo Zhang and Ding Ding

The correlates of physical activity differ across domains. The authors explored the contribution of domain-specific physical activity to total physical activity and examined how different sociodemographic and social capital-related variables are associated with different physical activity domains in older adults, using nationally representative samples from six low- to middle-income countries. Activity at work and home combined plays an important role in contributing to total physical activity, while leisure-time physical activity accounted for an extremely small proportion. Some correlates of physical activity were similar across countries, such as working status and structural social capital, while other associations were country specific. Promoting structural social capital, trust, and perceived safety may confer positive benefits on older adults’ activity.

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Emmanuel Chiebuka Okoye, Christopher Olusanjo Akosile, Fatai Adesina Maruf, Ifeoma Uchenna Onwuakagba and Victoria Chinonye Chukwuma

Objectives: To cross-culturally adapt and validate the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) into Igbo culture. Methods: The English version of the PASE (E-PASE) was translated into Igbo, harmonized, back-translated, subjected to expert panel review, and pretested. The final Igbo version of PASE (I-PASE), the E-PASE, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire were then administered to consecutively recruited 109 consenting Igbo older adults. Data were analyzed using frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, Mann–Whitney U test, Spearman rank-order correlation, and Cronbach’s alpha at .05 level of significance. Results: All items on the E-PASE were retained on the I-PASE but some modifications were made. The I-PASE had poor internal consistency coefficient (α = .66), poor-to-excellent item, and total score known-group validity (ρ = .24–1.00) and moderate convergent validity (ρ = .50). Conclusion: The I-PASE is a valid, reliable, and culturally specific tool for assessing PA among Igbo older adults.

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Élvio R. Gouveia, Asim Smailagic, Andreas Ihle, Adilson Marques, Bruna R. Gouveia, Mónica Cameirão, Honorato Sousa, Matthias Kliegel and Daniel Siewiorek

Background and Objectives: Regular physical exercise can attenuate age-related cognitive decline. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a physical exercise multicomponent training based on exergames on cognitive functioning (CF) in older adults. Research Design and Methods: This randomized controlled trial included older adults aged 61–78. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group (IG; n = 15) or active control group (CG; n = 16). The IG was exposed to a combined training with traditional exercise and exergaming, twice a week over a period of 12 weeks. The CG performed only traditional sessions. CF was assessed by the Cognitive Telephone Screening Instrument. The time points for assessment were at zero (pretest), 12 (posttest), and 17 weeks (follow-up). Results: Active CG and IG increased from pretest to posttest in short-term memory (STM), long-term memory (LTM), and Cognitive Telephone Screening Instrument total score 1.98 > Z < 3.00, ps < .005, with moderately large positive effects (.36 > r < .54). A significant increase was seen from posttest to follow-up in STM, Z = 2.74, p = .006, and LTM, Z = 2.31, p < .021, only in IG. Across the two time periods posttest to follow-up, there were significant interaction effects between program type and time for STM (p = .022, ηp2=.17) and LTM (p = .004, ηp2=.25), demonstrating a more beneficial effect of the exergames intervention compared to the CG. Discussion and Implications: The integration of exergaming in a multicomponent functional fitness exercise might have the potential to maintain and improve CF (in particular, STM and LTM) in older adults.

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Barbara Resnick, Marie Boltz, Elizabeth Galik, Steven Fix and Shijun Zhu

This study tested the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the MotionWatch 8 among assisted living residents with and without cognitive impairment. Data from the Dissemination and Implementation of Function Focused Care in Assisted Living Using the Evidence Integration Triangle study were used. The sample included 781 individuals from 85 facilities with a mean age of 89.48 (SD = 7.43) years. The majority were female (71%), White (97%), and overall (44%) had cognitive impairment. A total of 70% were willing to wear the MotionWatch 8. Reliability was supported as there was no difference in time spent in activity across three consecutive wear days. Validity was based on hypothesis testing, and function was associated with counts of activity at baseline (p = .001) and 4 months (p = .001). Those with cognitive impairment engaged in less physical activity (p = .04). The MotionWatch 8 is a useful option for measuring physical activity in older adults with and without cognitive impairment.

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Lucy V. Piggott and Jordan J.K. Matthews

Within this article, the authors explore the extent to which the administrative and governance hierarchies, rules, and processes of two English national governing bodies (NGBs) reproduce or resist gender segregation and male dominance within their leadership and governance. Drawing on Bourdieu’s theory of practice, the authors expand upon current literature to better understand the workings of gender power relations at the structural level of organizational practice. Semistructured interviews with male and female leaders were supplemented by an analysis of formal documents. The authors found that gender power relations privileging men were simultaneously conserved and resisted within the two NGBs. While resistance to male-dominated leadership and governance was evident, transformational organizational change was lacking. This highlighted the limitations of strategies being primarily driven through top-down, policy-based approaches. The authors end the article by emphasizing the importance of a combined approach at the structural, cultural, and individual levels to enable sustainable and transformational organizational change.

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Cristian Jaque, Phillip Véliz, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Jason Moran, Paulo Gentil and Jorge Cancino

The authors compared the effects of bodyweight resistance training at moderate- or high-speed conditions on muscle power, velocity of movement, and functional performance in older females. In a randomized, single-blinded noncontrolled trial, participants completed 12 weeks (three sessions/week) of bodyweight resistance training at high (n = 14; age = 70.6 ± 4.3 years) or moderate (n = 12; age = 72.8 ± 4.2 years) speeds. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance (Group × Time) with α level set at <.05. After the intervention, timed up and go test performance (p < .05) and the rising from a chair test mean (22.4%) and maximal velocity (28.5%), mean (24.4%) and maximal power (27.7%), normalized mean (25.1%), and normalized maximal power (28.5%) increased in the high-speed group (p < .05). However, the moderate-speed group achieved no improvements (Δ6.7–14.4%; p > .2). The authors conclude that high-speed bodyweight resistance training is an effective and economically practical strategy to improve the functional capacity of older women relevant to daily life activities.

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Motoko Taguchi, Akiko Hara, Hiroko Murata, Suguru Torii and Takayuki Sako

For athletes to gain body mass, especially muscle, an increase in energy consumption is necessary. To increase their energy intake, many athletes consume more meals, including supplementary meals or snacks. However, the influence of meal frequency on changes in body composition and appetite is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of meal frequency on changes in body composition and appetite during weight gain in athletes through a well-controlled dietary intervention. Ten male collegiate rowers with weight gain goals were included in this study. The subjects were randomly classified into two groups, and dietary intervention was implemented using a crossover method. During the intervention period, all subjects were provided identical meals aimed to provide a positive energy balance. The meals were consumed at a frequency of either three times (regular frequency) or six times (high frequency) a day. Body composition was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the visual analog scale was used for the evaluation of appetite. In both trials, body weight, fat-free mass, and fat mass significantly increased; however, an interaction (Trial × Time) was not observed. Visual analog scale did not vary between trials. Our data suggest that partitioning identical excess dietary intakes over three or six meals does not influence changes in body composition or appetite during weight gain in athletes.