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Emmanuel Chiebuka Okoye, Christopher Olusanjo Akosile, Fatai Adesina Maruf, Ifeoma Uchenna Onwuakagba and Victoria Chinonye Chukwuma

Objectives: To cross-culturally adapt and validate the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) into Igbo culture. Methods: The English version of the PASE (E-PASE) was translated into Igbo, harmonized, back-translated, subjected to expert panel review, and pretested. The final Igbo version of PASE (I-PASE), the E-PASE, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire were then administered to consecutively recruited 109 consenting Igbo older adults. Data were analyzed using frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, Mann–Whitney U test, Spearman rank-order correlation, and Cronbach’s alpha at .05 level of significance. Results: All items on the E-PASE were retained on the I-PASE but some modifications were made. The I-PASE had poor internal consistency coefficient (α = .66), poor-to-excellent item, and total score known-group validity (ρ = .24–1.00) and moderate convergent validity (ρ = .50). Conclusion: The I-PASE is a valid, reliable, and culturally specific tool for assessing PA among Igbo older adults.

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Élvio R. Gouveia, Asim Smailagic, Andreas Ihle, Adilson Marques, Bruna R. Gouveia, Mónica Cameirão, Honorato Sousa, Matthias Kliegel and Daniel Siewiorek

Background and Objectives: Regular physical exercise can attenuate age-related cognitive decline. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a physical exercise multicomponent training based on exergames on cognitive functioning (CF) in older adults. Research Design and Methods: This randomized controlled trial included older adults aged 61–78. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group (IG; n = 15) or active control group (CG; n = 16). The IG was exposed to a combined training with traditional exercise and exergaming, twice a week over a period of 12 weeks. The CG performed only traditional sessions. CF was assessed by the Cognitive Telephone Screening Instrument. The time points for assessment were at zero (pretest), 12 (posttest), and 17 weeks (follow-up). Results: Active CG and IG increased from pretest to posttest in short-term memory (STM), long-term memory (LTM), and Cognitive Telephone Screening Instrument total score 1.98 > Z < 3.00, ps < .005, with moderately large positive effects (.36 > r < .54). A significant increase was seen from posttest to follow-up in STM, Z = 2.74, p = .006, and LTM, Z = 2.31, p < .021, only in IG. Across the two time periods posttest to follow-up, there were significant interaction effects between program type and time for STM (p = .022, ηp2=.17) and LTM (p = .004, ηp2=.25), demonstrating a more beneficial effect of the exergames intervention compared to the CG. Discussion and Implications: The integration of exergaming in a multicomponent functional fitness exercise might have the potential to maintain and improve CF (in particular, STM and LTM) in older adults.

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Barbara Resnick, Marie Boltz, Elizabeth Galik, Steven Fix and Shijun Zhu

This study tested the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the MotionWatch 8 among assisted living residents with and without cognitive impairment. Data from the Dissemination and Implementation of Function Focused Care in Assisted Living Using the Evidence Integration Triangle study were used. The sample included 781 individuals from 85 facilities with a mean age of 89.48 (SD = 7.43) years. The majority were female (71%), White (97%), and overall (44%) had cognitive impairment. A total of 70% were willing to wear the MotionWatch 8. Reliability was supported as there was no difference in time spent in activity across three consecutive wear days. Validity was based on hypothesis testing, and function was associated with counts of activity at baseline (p = .001) and 4 months (p = .001). Those with cognitive impairment engaged in less physical activity (p = .04). The MotionWatch 8 is a useful option for measuring physical activity in older adults with and without cognitive impairment.

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Cristian Jaque, Phillip Véliz, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Jason Moran, Paulo Gentil and Jorge Cancino

The authors compared the effects of bodyweight resistance training at moderate- or high-speed conditions on muscle power, velocity of movement, and functional performance in older females. In a randomized, single-blinded noncontrolled trial, participants completed 12 weeks (three sessions/week) of bodyweight resistance training at high (n = 14; age = 70.6 ± 4.3 years) or moderate (n = 12; age = 72.8 ± 4.2 years) speeds. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance (Group × Time) with α level set at <.05. After the intervention, timed up and go test performance (p < .05) and the rising from a chair test mean (22.4%) and maximal velocity (28.5%), mean (24.4%) and maximal power (27.7%), normalized mean (25.1%), and normalized maximal power (28.5%) increased in the high-speed group (p < .05). However, the moderate-speed group achieved no improvements (Δ6.7–14.4%; p > .2). The authors conclude that high-speed bodyweight resistance training is an effective and economically practical strategy to improve the functional capacity of older women relevant to daily life activities.

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Lucas Ugliara, James J. Tufano, Martim Bottaro and Amilton Vieira

Measuring ankle torque is of paramount importance. This study compared the test–retest reliability of the plantar flexion torque–generating capacity between older and younger men. Twenty-one older (68 ± 6 years) and 22 younger (25 ± 5 years) men were tested twice for maximal isometric plantar flexion. Peak torque (PT), rate of torque development, and contractile impulses (CI) were obtained from 0 to 50 ms (rate of torque development0–50; CI0–50) and from 100 to 200 ms (rate of torque development100–200; CI100–200). Typical error as the coefficient of variation (CVTE) and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to assess test–retest reliability. Student’s t test was applied to investigate systematic errors. The CVTE ratio was used for between-group comparisons. Only PT demonstrated acceptable reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ .75 and CV ≤ 10%). Older men demonstrated greater CVTE than younger men for PT (ratio = 2.24), but lesser for rapid torque (ratio ≤ 0.84). Younger men demonstrated systematic error for PT (6.5%) and CI100–200 (−8.9%). In conclusion, older men demonstrated greater variability for maximal torque output, but lesser for rapid torque.

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Yi-Ling Hu, Marian Keglovits, Emily Somerville, Makenna Snyder and Susan Stark

The Lifestyle-integrated Functional Exercise Program (LiFE) is proven to have high adherence rates and can significantly reduce falls, but it has not yet been implemented for diverse older adults residing in urban medically underserved (MU) areas. An exploratory sequential mixed methods study was conducted to adapt LiFE and test the adapted program’s preliminary feasibility. Focus groups with MU older adults and service providers were conducted to identify modifications. The new adapted program, Diverse Older Adults Doing LiFE (DO LiFE), was then evaluated with older adults. Thematic analysis revealed health literacy and lack of racial representation as barriers to implementing LIFE in this population. The pilot study showed that DO LiFE was feasible with good retention (89%) and high adherence (81.27%) rates. DO LiFE demonstrated preliminary feasibility for diverse MU older adults. Researchers should proceed to larger studies for translating DO LiFE from research to the community.

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Shannon Halloway, JoEllen Wilbur, Lynne T. Braun, Michael E. Schoeny and Annabelle Santos Volgman

Background: Cognitive impairment disproportionately affects older women with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Physical activity (PA) and cognitive training (CT) may have synergistic effects in combined interventions. However, no combined intervention has targeted women with CVD or utilized a sustainable and preferable lifestyle approach. The purpose was to test feasibility and acceptability of the 24-week MindMoves program, a lifestyle intervention that combined PA and CT developed for older women with CVD. Methods: The PA component included goal setting with Fitbits and 5 behavioral group meetings. The CT component was evidence-based BrainHQ delivered on a tablet in three 30-minute weekly sessions. Participants included 10 women aged ≥65 years with CVD. Exclusion criteria were cognitive impairment, regular PA, and CT use. Measures were feasibility (recruitment, attendance, participation, retention, and acceptability), change in PA (Fitbit min/steps), and change in cognitive function (NIH Toolbox®). Results: Of the 10 participants, 70% attended ≥4/5 group meetings, and overall attendance was 76%. Participants completed 2.3/3 CT sessions weekly. Participant retention was 100%. Over 90% of participants rated MindMoves with the highest levels of satisfaction. Participants had significant improvements in steps, light PA, and moderate PA, and there was a trend for improved cognition. Conclusions: Findings support testing MindMoves in an efficacy trial.

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Pedro C. Hallal

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Bonny Rockette-Wagner, Rachel G. Miller, Yvonne L. Eaglehouse, Vincent C. Arena, M. Kaye Kramer and Andrea M. Kriska

Background: The importance of leisure sedentary behavior (LSB) change in diabetes prevention efforts is not well known. This study examines the relationships between changes in self-reported LSB and the primary intervention goals (weight and moderate-intensity to vigorous-intensity physical activity [MVPA]) during a community-based translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (the Group Lifestyle Balance Program). Methods: A total of 322 adults at risk for type 2 diabetes were recruited from 3 community centers, a worksite, and military site. Community and worksite participants were randomized to immediate or delayed-delivery (control) intervention. All military site participants (n = 99) received immediate intervention. Logistic and linear generalized estimating equations were used to determine associations between LSB changes and weight-related outcomes and MVPA. Results: Results were obtained for 259 (80.4%) participants. The LSB decreased after 6 and 12 months (mean [95% confidence interval]: −25.7 [−38.6 to −12.8] and −16.1 [−28.2 to −3.9] min/d; both P < .05). Each 20-minute reduction in LSB was associated with a 5% increase in odds of meeting the weight-loss goal (6 mo: odds ratio = 1.05 [1.002 to 1.102]; P = .042; adjusted model including MVPA), but LSB was not related to changes in reported MVPA minutes or MVPA goal achievement. Conclusion: Within the context of existing lifestyle intervention programs, reducing sedentary behavior has the potential to contribute to weight loss separately from reported MVPA improvement.

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María Morales-Suárez-Varela, Eva Clemente-Bosch, Isabel Peraita-Costa, Agustín Llopis-Morales, Isabel Martínez and Agustín Llopis-González

Background: The practice of physical exercise during pregnancy has benefits for both the mother and baby. Currently, there is scientific evidence that supports the inclusion of a monitored physical activity program in the daily activities of pregnant women. The objective of this study is to provide an overview of the current status of the association between physical activity during pregnancy and the effects on the mother and the newborn. Methods: A systematic review of the literature, assessing each study using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, from different databases PubMed, Embase, or ScienceDirect, on the association between maternal physical activity and its effects on the mother and the newborn published from 2010 until 2018 was conducted. Results: About 25 studies were identified and divided into categories according to the health problems affecting the mother or newborn. It was found that 8% of all the studies received a grade B, 68% obtained a grade C, and the remaining 24% obtained less than a grade C. Improved cardiovascular function, decreased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and the limitation of weight gain are among the benefits to the mother with lower percentage of body fat, increased gestational age, and potentially improved neurodevelopment as benefits for the child. Conclusions: The realization of physical activity during pregnancy is supported by most of the studies reviewed. However, given the vulnerability of the studied populations, more studies on the association between physical activity and pregnancy are necessary.