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Ansley E. Swann, Rachel R. Kleis and Johanna M. Hoch

Clinical Question: Is there a relationship between resilience and self-reported function in patients who underwent a total joint arthroplasty? Clinical Bottom Line: There is inconsistent, good-quality Level II evidence that investigates the relationship between resilience and self-reported function in patients after joint arthroplasty.

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Jongil Lim, Jiyeon Kim, Kyoungho Seo, Richard E.A. van Emmerik and Sukho Lee

The aim of this study was to examine how usage of mobile devices while simultaneously walking affects walking characteristics and texting performance of normal weight (NW) and obese (OB) individuals. Thirty-two OB (body mass index [BMI] = 34.4) and NW (BMI = 22.7) adults performed two 60-s walking trials at three-step frequencies along a rectangular walkway in two conditions (No Texting and Texting). Dual-task cost as well as unadjusted spatial and temporal gait characteristics were measured. Dual-task costs for the gait parameters as well as texting performance were not different between the groups, except for the lateral step variability showing a larger variability at the preferred frequency in OB individuals. For the unadjusted variables, OB exhibited longer double support, longer stance time, and lower turn velocity compared with NW. Overall, the results highlight a similar dual-task cost for the OB individuals compared with the NW individuals, in spite of underlying differences in gait mechanics.

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Lin Li, Yanxia Li, Chang-hong Wu and Hao Fu

The aim of the current work was to verify three-dimensional directional effects on the reproduction error precision of the human upper limb position. Thirty male subjects without history of upper limb pathology were recruited from Renmin University of China. A three-dimensional position reproduction task in six directions (up, down, left, right, far, and near) was performed by each subject. The results suggested that the proprioceptive sense of upper limb position depends on the direction, with smaller absolute errors in Directions 4 (right) and 5 (far) than in Directions 1 (up), 2 (down), 3 (left), and 6 (near). Proprioception near the end of the elbow joint range of motion may be more reliable and sensitive. Subjects reproduced fewer ranges in the horizontal plane (Directions 3, 5, and 6) and they overshot the target position along the z-axis (vertical direction) except for Direction 6. Overestimations of position in the z-axis may be caused by overestimations of force.

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Ashley E. Evans, Madeline Curtis, Marguerite (Meg) Montjoy and Erica Beidler

Context: The rate of sport-related concussion diagnosis has significantly increased in recent years, which has created a need for injury prevention initiatives. There have been efforts put forth by researchers and American football organizations to teach athletes how to tackle properly in order to decrease the number of subconcussive head impacts and concussions. Clinical Question: Does the implementation of a behavioral tackling intervention decrease the head impact frequency in American football players? Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate SORT Level B evidence to support the use of behavioral tackling interventions as a means for reducing head impact frequency in football athletes. All four included studies found a significant reduction in head impacts following a behavioral tackling intervention with study findings ranging from a 26–33% reduction in impact frequency. These findings were consistent in youth, high school, and college football players and for different types of behavioral tackling interventions. Therefore, these results indicate that behavioral tackling interventions have the potential to reduce the number of head impacts sustained by American football players, which may ultimately lead to a reduction in concussion occurrence as well.

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Justin Goins

Clinical Question: What is the most optimal position to perform the prone hip extension exercise in order to improve the gluteus maximus to hamstring activation ratio? Clinical Bottom Line: There does not appear to be a specific position recommended to perform the prone hip extension exercise in order to activate the gluteus maximus over the hamstrings.

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Irfan A. Khan and Kelley Henderson

Clinical Question: What is the efficacy of myofascial release, combined with trigger point therapy, in treating pain in patients with tension-type headaches? Clinical Bottom Line: There is significant evidence to support the use of myofascial release and trigger point therapy in patients with pain from tension-type headaches.

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Daniel G. Miner, Brent A. Harper and Stephen M. Glass

Context: Current tools for sideline assessment of balance following a concussion may not be sufficiently sensitive to identify impairments, which may place athletes at risk for future injury. Quantitative field-expedient balance assessments are becoming increasingly accessible in sports medicine and may improve sensitivity to enable clinicians to more readily detect these subtle deficits. Objective: To determine the validity of the postural sway assessment on the Biodex BioSway™ compared with the gold standard NeuroCom Smart Equitest System. Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting: Clinical research laboratory. Participants: Forty-nine healthy adults (29 females: 24.34 [2.45] y, height 163.65 [7.57] cm, mass 63.64 [7.94] kg; 20 males: 26.00 [3.70] y, height 180.11 [7.16] cm, mass 82.97 [12.78] kg). Intervention(s): The participants completed the modified clinical test of sensory interaction in balance on the Biodex BioSway™ with 2 additional conditions (head shake and firm surface; head shake and foam surface) and the Sensory Organization Test and Head Shake Sensory Organization Test on the NeuroCom Smart Equitest. Main Outcome Measures: Interclass correlation coefficient and Bland–Altman limits of agreement for Sway Index, equilibrium ratio, and area of 95% confidence ellipse. Results: Fair–good reliability (interclass correlation coefficient = .48–.65) was demonstrated for the stance conditions with eyes open on a firm surface. The Head Shake Sensory Interaction and Balance Test condition on a firm surface resulted in fair reliability (interclass correlation coefficient = .50–.59). The authors observed large ranges for limits of agreement across outcome measures, indicating that the systems should not be used interchangeably. Conclusions: The authors observed fair reliability between BioSway™ and NeuroCom, with better agreement between systems with the assessment of postural sway on firm/static surfaces. However, the agreement of these systems may improve by incorporating methods that mitigate the floor effect in an athletic population (eg, including a head shake condition). BioSway™ may provide a surrogate field-expedient measurement tool.

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Ghada Jouira, Selim Srihi, Fatma Ben Waer, Haithem Rebai and Sonia Sahli

Context: Athletes with intellectual disability (ID) have a high risk of injury while participating in various sports. Warm-up (WU) is the most preventive measure to reduce injuries in sports. Objective: To investigate the effects of dynamic stretching WU (DS-WU) and plyometric WU (PL-WU) on dynamic balance in athletes with ID. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Participants: A total of 12 athletes with ID (age 24.5 [3.22] y, height 165.7 [8.4] cm, weight 61.5 [7.1] kg, intelligence quotient 61.1 [3.5]). Main Outcome Measures: Dynamic balance was assessed using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) at pre-WU, post-WU, and 15 minutes post-WU for both the DS-WU and the PL-WU. A 2-way analysis of variance (3 sessions × 2 WU methods) with repeated-measures was used in this study. Results: Following the DS-WU, participants demonstrated significant improvements in the SEBT composite score post-WU (89.12% [5.54%] vs 87.04% [5.35%]; P < .01) and at 15 minutes post-WU (89.55% [5.28%] vs 87.04%, P < .01) compared with pre-WU. However, no significant difference between these two post-WU scores (post-WU and 15 min post-WU) was found. For the PL-WU, participants demonstrated a significant decrease in the SEBT composite score at post-WU (85.95% [5.49%] vs 87.02% [5.73%]; P < .05); however, these scores increased significantly at 15 minutes post-WU (88.60% [5.42%] vs 87.02% [5.49%]; P < .05) compared with that at pre-WU. The SEBT composite scores are significantly higher in the DS-WU than in the PL-WU at both post-WU sessions (P < .05). Conclusion: Both DS-WU and PL-WU could improve dynamic balance and may be recommended as WUs in athletes with ID; however, particular caution should be exercised immediately after the PL-WU.