Browse

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 16,603 items for :

  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
Clear All
Restricted access

L. Jayne Beselt, Michelle C. Patterson, Meghan H. McDonough, Jennifer Hewson and Scott MacKay

Physical activity (PA) and social support have known benefits for the well-being and health of older adults, and social support is associated with PA behavior and positive affective experiences in PA contexts. The aim of this study was to synthesize qualitative research conducted on the experiences of social support related to PA among older adults (age ≥55 years). Following meta-study methodology, the authors searched nine databases and extracted information from 31 studies. Results were synthesized in terms of common themes and in light of theoretical and methodological perspectives used. The qualitative literature identifies supportive behaviors and social network outcomes which may be useful for informing how best to support older adults to be physically active. This literature rarely reflected the experiences of vulnerable populations, and future research should aim to further understand supportive behaviors which enable older adults to overcome barriers and challenges to being physically active.

Restricted access

Katherine Holland and Justin A. Haegele

The purpose of this article is to review qualitative inquiries examining the perspectives of students with disabilities toward physical education (PE) published from 2014 to 2019, as an update to the 2015 review by Haegele and Sutherland. Keyword searches were used to identify articles from nine electronic databases, and seven articles met all inclusion criteria. The seven selected articles were subjected to a narrative analysis, and three thematic clusters emerged: (a) an “inconvenience”: the PE teacher’s influence on quality of experience, (b) “we play together and I like it”: friendships central to the quality of PE experience, and (c) “no lift access to the gym”: barriers to successful participation. Findings from this review support the notion that students with disabilities may have positive experiences in PE if they are offered appropriate modifications and accommodations and are provided with increased kind and supportive interactions with staff and peers.

Restricted access

Kaitlin M. Gallagher, Anita N. Vasavada, Leah Fischer and Ethan C. Douglas

A popular posture for using wireless technology is reclined sitting, with the trunk rotated posteriorly to the hips. This position decreases the head’s gravitational moment; however, the head angle relative to the trunk is similar to that of upright sitting when using a tablet in the lap. This study compared cervical extensor musculotendon length changes from neutral among 3 common sitting postures and maximum neck flexion while using a tablet. Twenty-one participants had radiographs taken in neutral, full-flexion, and upright, semireclined, and reclined postures with a tablet in their lap. A biomechanical model was used to calculate subject-specific normalized musculotendon lengths for 27 cervical musculotendon segments. The lower cervical spine was more flexed during reclined sitting, but the skull was more flexed during upright sitting. Normalized musculotendon length increased in the reclined compared with an upright sitting position for the C4-C6/7 (deep) and C2-C6/7 (superficial) multifidi, semispinalis cervicis (C2-C7), and splenius capitis (Skull-C7). The suboccipital (R 2 = .19–.71) and semispinalis capitis segment length changes were significantly correlated with the Skull-C1 angle (0.24–0.51). A semireclined reading position may be an ideal sitting posture to reduce the head’s gravitational moment arm without overstretching the assessed muscles.

Restricted access

Banu Unver, Kartal Selici, Eda Akbas and Emin Ulas Erdem

The purpose of the study was to investigate the foot posture, ankle muscle strength, range of motion (ROM), and plantar sensation differences among normal weight, overweight, and obese individuals. One hundred and twenty-three individuals (42 normal weight, 40 overweight, and 41 obese) aged between 18 and 50 years participated in the study. Foot posture, ankle muscle strength, ROM, plantar sensation, and foot-related disabilities were evaluated. The relative muscle strength of left plantar flexors and invertors and light touch sensation of the left heel were significantly lower in obese individuals compared with overweight and normal weight (P < .016) individuals. Obese individuals had significantly reduced relative muscle strength of plantar flexors, dorsiflexor, and invertors, plantar flexion and inversion ROM in the left foot; and light touch sensation of the right heel compared with normal weight (P < .016) individuals. Foot Posture Index scores were significantly higher in obese individuals compared with overweight (P < .016) individuals. There were no significant differences in absolute muscle strength, vibration sensation, and foot-related disability scores among the 3 groups (P > .05). Obesity was found to have adverse effects on ankle muscle strength, ROM, and plantar light touch sensation. Vibration sensation was not affected by body mass index, and foot-related disability was not observed in obese adults.

Restricted access

Caleb D. Johnson and Irene S. Davis

Higher medial–lateral forces have been reported in individuals with stiffer foot arches. However, this was in a small sample of military personnel who ran with a rearfoot strike pattern. Therefore, our purpose was to investigate whether runners, both rearfoot and forefoot strikers, show different associations between medial–lateral forces and arch stiffness. A group of 118 runners (80 rearfoot strikers and 38 forefoot strikers) were recruited. Ground reaction force data were collected during running on an instrumented treadmill. Arch flexibility was assessed as the difference in arch height from sitting to standing positions, and participants were classified into stiff/flexible groups. Group comparisons were performed for the ratio of medial:vertical and lateral:vertical impulses. In rearfoot strikers, runners with stiff arches demonstrated significantly higher medial:vertical impulse ratios (P = .036). Forefoot strikers also demonstrated higher proportions of medial forces; however, the mean difference did not reach statistical significance (P = .084). No differences were detected in the proportion of lateral forces between arch flexibility groups. Consistent with previous findings in military personnel, our results indicate that recreational runners with stiffer arches have a higher proportion of medial forces. Therefore, increasing foot flexibility may increase the ability to attenuate medial forces.