Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 34,951 items for

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Volume 41 (2024): Issue 3 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Volume 34 (2024): Issue 4 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Volume 19 (2024): Issue 7 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Volume 21 (2024): Issue 7 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Volume 38 (2024): Issue 4 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Volume 33 (2024): Issue 5 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Volume 43 (2024): Issue 3 (Jul 2024)

Restricted access

Intraday Variation of Ankle Dorsiflexion in Short-Track Speed Skaters

Jules Claudel, Émilie Turner, and Julien Clément

Purpose: Optimal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion plays a vital role in attaining the essential crouched posture necessary for excelling in speed skating. The purpose of this study was to determine how the ankle dorsiflexion angle evolves throughout a day of training and to identify the factors that influence this angle. Methods: Thirty short-track speed skaters, from 2 teams, participated in this study. The maximum ankle dorsiflexion angle was obtained in a lunge position facing a wall, using a digital inclinometer. All measures were obtained 3 times per side, 6 times per day, on 2 training days separated by at least a week. We conducted multiple tests to study the impact of repetition, day, side, team level, sex, and moment on the ankle dorsiflexion angle. Results: The 3 times repeated measures and the 2 days of training did not have a significant influence on the results. There was a statistically significant difference between the first time point of the day and the 5 other time points for both ankles. Moreover, the influence of sex and team level was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The results indicate that there are significant changes in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion but only after the first warm-up of the day. Such findings could enable team staff to enhance athletes’ precompetition preparation and tailor ankle mobility training regimens more effectively.

Restricted access

Recommendations for Implementation of Dog Therapy Intervention in the Athletic Training Facility

Rebecca Covach, Lindsey Keenan, and Emily Duckett

Dog therapy is implemented in various healthcare fields because of its unique ability to reduce perceived anxiety and hormonal stress, increase positive patient relationships with practitioners, and assist with demonstrating procedures. However, implementation of dog therapy in a clinical athletic training setting is not frequently discussed in relevant literature. This article outlines recommendations for the use and efficacy of therapy dogs in an athletic training facility, based on data from several studies across various healthcare fields. We provide information regarding best practice recommendations to incorporate therapy dogs into athletic training services, as well as the necessary administrative aspects and safeguards. Athletic trainers can use these recommendations and framework to explore the implementation of dog therapy into clinical practice.

Restricted access

A Two-Sample Examination of the Relationship Between Trait Emotional Intelligence, Burnout, and Coping Strategies in Athletes

Pia Zajonz, Robert S. Vaughan, and Sylvain Laborde

Competitive sport has the potential to increase chronic stress and, hence, the risk of burnout. The aim of this paper was, first, to examine the relationship between athlete burnout and trait emotional intelligence (TEI) and, second, to look at the mediating role of coping strategies between TEI and athlete burnout. In two samples of athletes (N 1 = 290; N 2 = 144), we conducted correlation analyses linking dimensions of TEI with athlete burnout and found negative correlations. We then tested a structural equation model in the second sample, hypothesizing an indirect link between TEI and athlete burnout via coping strategies. Results showed a mediation effect of emotion-focused to problem-focused coping between TEI and athlete burnout. Avoidance coping showed a positive direct effect on athlete burnout. Further research should investigate effective coping strategies and clarify whether emotional intelligence training may be used to protect athletes from developing burnout.