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Volume 34 (2024): Issue 3 (May 2024)

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INTERNATIONAL SPORT COACHING JOURNAL

DIGEST, VOLUME 11 ISSUE 1

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Volume 11 (2024): Issue 2 (May 2024)

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Volume 38 (2024): Issue 3 (May 2024)

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Volume 36 (2024): Issue 2 (May 2024)

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Addressing the Critical Need for Holistic Mental Health Support in Rugby: Reflections on Systematic Review Findings

Lien-Chung Wei

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Concise Introduction to Sport Marketing

Zack P. Pedersen

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Factors Affecting Women Sports Officials’ Intention to Leave Across Europe

Pamela Wicker, George B. Cunningham, and Tom Webb

This study examines the factors affecting women officials’ intention to leave their chosen sport, including personal, work-related, and sociocultural factors. The empirical analysis is based on survey data of women officials in 69 different sports across Europe (n = 3,214). Overall, 10.7% of women expressed a turnover intention. Regression analyses indicate that this intention is higher for women who have more officiating experience (16–20 years), officiate at lower levels of sport (grassroots, junior), frequently experience abuse, and dislike the stress and time commitments of officiating, lack of support from the federation, and their lack of opportunity to progress. Younger women (≤24 years) with a mentor, who enjoy being part of a sport community and live in a more gender equal society are less likely to leave. The findings suggest that multiple factors are at work, which need to be addressed by sport managers to retain women in officiating roles.

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Interventions Based on Behavior Change Techniques to Encourage Physical Activity or Decrease Sedentary Behavior in Community-Dwelling Adults Aged 50–70: Systematic Review With Intervention Component Analysis

Saima Ahmed, Kimberly Lazo Green, Lisa McGarrigle, Annemarie Money, Neil Pendleton, and Chris Todd

Increasing physical activity (PA) and/or decreasing sedentary behaviors is important in the delay and prevention of long-term conditions. PA can help maintain function and independence and decrease the need for hospitalization/institutionalization. Activity rates often decline in later life resulting in a need for interventions that encourage uptake and adherence through the use of Behavior Change Techniques (BCTs). We conducted a systematic review of the evidence for interventions that included BCTs in community-dwelling adults with a mean age of 50–70. The review followed PRISMA guidelines. The interventions were psychosocial, nonpharmacological, and noninvasive interventions utilizing components based on BCTs that evaluated change in PA and/or sedentary behavior. Intervention Component Analysis (ICA) was used to synthesize effectiveness of intervention components. Twelve randomized controlled trials were included in this review. The mean sample age was 50–64. Thirteen BCTs were used across all studies, and the most commonly used techniques were goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and natural consequences. Seven intervention components linked with BCTs were found: personalized goal setting, tailored feedback from facilitators, on-site and postintervention support, education materials and resources, reinforcing change on behavior and attitudes, self-reported monitoring, and social connectedness. All components, except for social connectedness, were associated with improved health behavior and PA levels. The interventions that use BCTs have incorporated strategies that reinforce change in behavior and attitudes toward PA.

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Is It Possible to Decolonize the Field of Physical Activity and Health?

Alan G. Knuth, Giulia Salaberry Leite, Sueyla Ferreira da Silva dos Santos, and Inácio Crochemore-Silva

Is it possible to decolonize the field of physical activity and health? Decoloniality presupposes a body-geopolitical location, such as in the Brazilian and Latin American context, where it is crucial to use social identity lenses related to race, gender, sexuality, and other social markers that affect the body. Understanding health and physical activity from a decolonial perspective would bring the oppressions that connect capitalism, patriarchy, and racism to the center of the discussion. For a “physical activity other,” we challenged the general recommendation of physical activity in the 4 domains. Physical activity should be understood as an end in itself, as a right, and as human development. Approaches that advocate physical activity at work, at home, and while commuting use other human activities to relate these domains to health without considering the inequalities and oppressions that constitute them in most parts of the world. Is it fair to apply “global recommendations” for physical activity to scenarios such as Brazil and Latin America, using models that are inappropriate to the context and history of these places, people, and cultures? Perhaps it is time to socially reorient and reposition physical activity from a decolonial perspective. We need Black, Indigenous, Latino, African, and other people from the Global South to move the research agenda, recommendations, and policies on physical activity from “any” health to a fair health.