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Mariana R. Silva, Cristine L. Alberton, Caroline O. Braga and Stephanie S. Pinto

Background: To compare the acute effects of water-based aerobic–resistance and resistance–aerobic concurrent training (CT) sessions on energy expenditure (EE) during and postexercise in young women. Methods: Nine active women (24 [3] y; 60 [5] kg) completed 4 sessions: (1) familiarization, (2) aquatic maximal test to determine the heart rate corresponding to the anaerobic threshold, (3) CT protocol with aerobic–resistance sequence, and (4) CT protocol with resistance–aerobic sequence. Both protocols started and ended with the participants in the supine position for 30 minutes to perform resting and postexercise oxygen consumption measurements. The water-based resistance protocol comprised 4 sets of 15 seconds at maximal velocity, and the water-based aerobic protocol was performed at a continuous intensity (heart rate corresponding to the anaerobic threshold). EE measurements were calculated based on oxygen consumption and the corresponding caloric equivalent. Paired t test was used to compare the EE values between the water-based CT intrasession exercise sequences (α = .05). Results: There was no difference between the water-based aerobic–resistance and resistance–aerobic in total EE (330.78 vs 329.56 kcal; P = .96), EE per minute (7.35 vs 7.32 kcal·min−1; P = .96), and postexercise EE (63.65 vs 59.92 kcal; P = .50). Conclusions: The intrasession exercise sequence during water-based CT had no influence on the EE in young women.

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Brigid M. Lynch, Suzanne C. Dixon-Suen, Andrea Ramirez Varela, Yi Yang, Dallas R. English, Ding Ding, Paul A. Gardiner and Terry Boyle

Background: It is not always clear whether physical activity is causally related to health outcomes, or whether the associations are induced through confounding or other biases. Randomized controlled trials of physical activity are not feasible when outcomes of interest are rare or develop over many years. Thus, we need methods to improve causal inference in observational physical activity studies. Methods: We outline a range of approaches that can improve causal inference in observational physical activity research, and also discuss the impact of measurement error on results and methods to minimize this. Results: Key concepts and methods described include directed acyclic graphs, quantitative bias analysis, Mendelian randomization, and potential outcomes approaches which include propensity scores, g methods, and causal mediation. Conclusions: We provide a brief overview of some contemporary epidemiological methods that are beginning to be used in physical activity research. Adoption of these methods will help build a stronger body of evidence for the health benefits of physical activity.

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Samuel T. Tebeck, Jonathan D. Buckley, Clint R. Bellenger and Jamie Stanley

Purpose: To investigate the effect of a 5-day short-term heat acclimation (STHA) protocol in dry (43°C and 20% relative humidity) or humid (32°C and 80% relative humidity) environmental conditions on endurance cycling performance in temperate conditions (21°C). Methods: In a randomized, cross-over design, 11 cyclists completed each of the two 5-day blocks of STHA matched for heat index (44°C) and total exposure time (480 min), separated by 30 days. Pre- and post-STHA temperate endurance performance (4-min mean maximal power, lactate threshold 1 and 2) was assessed; in addition, a heat stress test was used to assess individual levels of heat adaptation. Results: Differences in endurance performance were unclear. Following dry STHA, gross mechanical efficiency was likely reduced (between-condition effect size dry vs humid −0.59; 90% confidence interval, −1.05 to −0.15), oxygen uptake was likely increased for a given workload (0.64 [0.14 to 1.07]), and energy expenditure likely increased (0.59 [0.17 to 1.03]). Plasma volume expansion at day 5 of acclimation was similar (within-condition outcome 4.6% [6.3%] and 5.3% [5.1%] dry and humid, respectively) but was retained for 3 to 4 days longer after the final humid STHA exposure (−0.2% [8.1%] and 4.5% [4.2%] dry and humid, respectively). Sweat rate was very likely increased during dry STHA (0.57 [0.25 to 0.89]) and possibly increased (0.18 [−0.15 to 0.50]) during humid STHA. Conclusion: STHA induced divergent adaptations between dry and humid conditions, but did not result in differences in temperate endurance performance.

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Ignacio Perez-Pozuelo, Thomas White, Kate Westgate, Katrien Wijndaele, Nicholas J. Wareham and Soren Brage

Background: Wrist-worn accelerometry is the commonest objective method for measuring physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies. Research-grade devices capture raw triaxial acceleration which, in addition to quantifying movement, facilitates assessment of orientation relative to gravity. No population-based study has yet described the interrelationship and variation of these features by time and personal characteristics. Methods: 2,043 United Kingdom adults (35–65 years) wore an accelerometer on the non-dominant wrist and a chest-mounted combined heart-rate-and-movement sensor for 7 days free-living. From raw (60 Hz) wrist acceleration, we derived movement (non-gravity acceleration) and pitch and roll (forearm) angles relative to gravity. We inferred physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) from combined sensing and sedentary time from approximate horizontal arm angle coupled with low movement. Results: Movement differences by time-of-day and day-of-week were associated with forearm angles; more movement in downward forearm positions. Mean (SD) movement was similar between sexes ∼31 (42) mg, despite higher PAEE in men. Women spent longer with the forearm pitched >0°, above horizontal (53% vs 36%), and less time at <0° (37% vs 53%). Diurnal pitch was 2.5–5° above and 0–7.5°below horizontal during night and daytime, respectively; corresponding roll angles were ∼0° (hand flat) and ∼20° (thumb-up). Differences were more pronounced in younger participants. All diurnal profiles indicated later wake-times on weekends. Daytime pitch was closer to horizontal on weekdays; roll was similar. Sedentary time was higher (17 vs 15 hours/day) in obese vs normal-weight individuals. Conclusions: More movement occurred in forearm positions below horizontal, commensurate with activities including walking. Findings suggest time-specific population differences in behaviors by age, sex, and BMI.

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Liam Sayer, Nidia Rodriguez-Sanchez, Paola Rodriguez-Giustiniani, Christopher Irwin, Danielle McCartney, Gregory R. Cox, Stuart D.R. Galloway and Ben Desbrow

This study investigated the effect of drinking rate on fluid retention of milk and water following exercise-induced dehydration. In Part A, 12 male participants lost 1.9% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water or low-fat milk equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Beverages were ingested over 30 or 90 min, resulting in four beverage treatments: water 30 min, water 90 min, milk 30 min, and milk 90 min. In Part B, 12 participants (nine males and three females) lost 2.0% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Water was ingested over 15 min (DR15), 45 min (DR45), or 90 min (DR90), with either DR15 or DR45 repeated. In both trials, nude body mass, urine volume, urine specific gravity and osmolality, plasma osmolality, and subjective ratings of gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained preexercise and every hour for 3 hr after the onset of drinking. In Part A, no effect of drinking rate was observed on the proportion of fluid retained, but milk retention was greater (p < .01) than water (water 30 min: 57% ± 16%, water 90 min: 60% ± 20%, milk 30 min: 83% ± 6%, and milk 90 min: 85% ± 7%). In Part B, fluid retention was greater in DR90 (57% ± 13%) than DR15 (50% ± 11%, p < .05), but this was within test–retest variation determined from the repeated trials (coefficient of variation: 17%). Within the range of drinking rates investigated the nutrient composition of a beverage has a more pronounced impact on fluid retention than the ingestion rate.

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Peter A. van de Hoef, Jur J. Brauers, Maarten van Smeden, Frank J.G. Backx and Michel S. Brink

Background: Plyometric training is a specific form of strength training that is used to improve the physical performance of athletes. An overview of the effects of plyometric training on soccer-specific outcomes in adult male soccer players is not available yet. Purpose: To systematically review and meta-analyze the effects of plyometric training on soccer-specific outcome measures in adult male soccer players and to identify which programs are most effective. Methods: PubMed, Embase/Medline, Cochrane, PEDro, and Scopus were searched. Extensive quality and risk of bias assessments were performed using the Cochrane ROBINS 2.0 for randomized trials. A random effects meta-analysis was performed using Cochrane Review Manager 5.3. Results: Seventeen randomized trials were included in the meta-analysis. The impact of plyometric training on strength, jump height, sprint speed, agility, and endurance was assessed. Only jump height, 20-m sprint speed, and endurance were significantly improved by plyometric training in soccer players. Results of the risk of bias assessment of the included studies resulted in overall scores of some concerns for risk of bias and high risk of bias. Conclusion: This review and meta-analysis showed that plyometric training improved jump height, 20-m sprint speed, and endurance, but not strength, sprint speed over other distances, or agility in male adult soccer players. However, the low quality of the included studies and substantial heterogeneity means that results need to be interpreted with caution. Future high-quality research should indicate whether or not plyometric training can be used to improve soccer-specific outcomes and thereby enhance performance.

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E. Kipling Webster, Leah E. Robinson and Danielle D. Wadsworth

Background: Activity breaks are an established way physical activity may be incorporated into the preschool day. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors influenced moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during a teacher-implemented classroom-based activity break (CBAB) in a Head Start population. Methods: Ten-minute CBAB was conducted over 2 days in a quasi-experimental design; 99 preschoolers (mean age 3.80 [0.65] y; 49.5% male) from a convenience sample participated. Accelerometers measured MVPA, fundamental motor skill competency was assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development—second edition, and weight classification status used body mass index percentiles. Results: A significant, moderate regression was found (r = .328, P = .001) between fundamental motor skill and MVPA. There was no significant correlation between body mass index percentile and MVPA during the CBAB. In addition, the locomotor subscale was the best predictor for MVPA for children during the CBAB (r = .32, β = 0.82, P < .001). Conclusions: CBAB equally elicited MVPA for normal and overweight preschoolers. Fundamental motor skill competency was associated with MVPA during the CBAB; in particular, locomotor skills were the best predictor for physical activity. Structured activity opportunities that focus on locomotor skills may be a useful integration to prompt more MVPA in a preschool-age population.

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Ed Maunder, Andrew E. Kilding, Christopher J. Stevens and Daniel J. Plews

A common practice among endurance athletes is to purposefully train in hot environments during a “heat stress camp.” However, combined exercise-heat stress poses threats to athlete well-being, and therefore, heat stress training has the potential to induce maladaptation. This case study describes the monitoring strategies used in a successful 3-week heat stress camp undertaken by 2 elite Ironman triathletes, namely resting heart rate variability, self-report well-being, and careful prescription of training based on previously collected physiological data. Despite the added heat stress, training volume very likely increased in both athletes, and training load very likely increased in one of the athletes, while resting heart rate variability and self-report well-being were maintained. There was also some evidence of favorable metabolic changes during routine laboratory testing following the camp. The authors therefore recommend that practitioners working with endurance athletes embarking on a heat stress training camp consider using the simple strategies employed in the present case study to reduce the risk of maladaptation and nonfunctional overreaching.

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Bianca Fernandes, Fabio Augusto Barbieri, Fernanda Zane Arthuso, Fabiana Araújo Silva, Gabriel Felipe Moretto, Luis Felipe Itikawa Imaizumi, Awassi Yophiwa Ngomane, Guilherme Veiga Guimarães and Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac

Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) versus moderate-intensity continuous exercise training (MICE) on hemodynamic and functional variables in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Twenty participants (13 men) were randomly assigned to a thrice-weekly HIIT (n = 12) or MICE (n = 8) for 12 weeks. Hemodynamic (resting heart rate and blood pressure, carotid femoral pulse wave velocity, endothelial reactivity, and heart rate variability) and functional variables (5-time sit-to-stand, timed up and go, and 6-min walking tests) assessed before and after training. Results: Demographic, hemodynamic and functional variables were similar between groups at baseline. Endothelial reactivity tended to increase after HIIT, but not after MICE, resulting in improved level (∼8%, P < .01) of this variable in HIIT versus MICE during follow-up. Six-minute walking test improved after HIIT (10.4 ± 3.8%, P < .05), but did not change after MICE. Sit to stand improved similarly after HIIT (27.2 ± 6.1%, P < .05) and MICE (21.5 ± 5.4%, P < .05). No significant changes were found after HIIT or MICE in any other variable assessed. Conclusion: These results suggest that exercise intensity may influence training-induced adaptation on endothelial reactivity and aerobic capacity in individuals with Parkinson’s disease.