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Brandon C. Platt, Sue Falsone and Kenneth C. Lam,

A 21-year-old male baseball catcher sustained an injury to the right testicle from a foul ball that ricocheted from the ground to his groin. The athlete was removed from competition when testicular pain began to increase. Ice was applied to the affected area and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were utilized through the evening. Further diagnosis and treatment were warranted the following morning. Diagnostic ultrasound revealed a fracture to the right testicle, necessitating surgical repair. The athlete followed a return-to-play progression and returned to play 20 days postinjury. This case describes evaluation and treatment of a rare acute condition and the need for early recognition and diagnosis.

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Jason P. Mihalik, Elizabeth F. Teel, Robert C. Lynall and Erin B. Wasserman

In equipment-heavy sports, there is a growing need to evaluate players in the condition in which they participate. However, the psychometric properties of the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) while wearing skates remains unknown. Seventy-four adolescent male hockey players completed the BESS with and without skates. A subset was reevaluated at the conclusion of the season. The BESS while wearing skates resulted in a mean of 15 more total errors than the traditional administration (t73 = 14.94, p < .001; ES = 1.95) and demonstrated low test-retest reliability. The BESS should be administered in the traditional manner (without skates).

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Daniel Wixey, Knud Ryom and Kieran Kingston

With early specialisation being commonplace within elite youth soccer, knowledge of the psychosocial implications associated with talent development practices would be of considerable use for the coaching practitioner. This paper uses case studies as a platform to discuss potential psychosocial implications of early specialisation, and further, it also offers practical suggestions for the elite youth soccer coach. Three case studies were chosen; each is an account of observations that took place within a British soccer academy. Themes of the case studies included adult-led structures in early specialisation, awareness of need thwarting coach behaviours, and the retention or release of players. The case studies were deliberately chosen to prompt discussion, reflection, and action. Following the presentation of each case study, a theoretically driven discussion is formulated. Practical suggestions are then provided to assist in the management of talent development practices within elite youth soccer and to further enrich the experiences of players. Concluding thoughts and areas for future research are briefly discussed.

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Katherine Craig, Shannon L. Jordan, Daniel R. Chilek, Doug Boatwright and Julio Morales

A 19-year-old female volleyball player reported shoulder pain, numbness, tingling, and difficulty gripping in her left arm. Provocation tests were positive for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). Duplex ultrasonography revealed occlusion of the subclavian artery. The athlete underwent a first rib resection and scalenectomy. A cervical rib and 75% of the first rib were excised. Rehabilitation consisted of regaining range of motion and strength. Return to play occurred after 14 weeks of rehabilitation. Thoracic outlet syndrome is rare and often misdiagnosed. All sports medicine professionals should have an understanding of TOS symptoms and path to diagnosis.

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Ali S. Tejani, Bert B. Vargas, Emily F. Middleton and Mu Huang

Though studies describe postconcussive changes in eye movements, there is a need for data describing baseline eye movements. The purpose of this study was to describe baseline eye movements and visual contrast acuity using the King-Devick (KD) Eye Tracking System and KD Visual Contrast Sensitivity Chart. Fewer total saccades were noted in soccer players than basketball players (soccer, 56.9 ± 14.3; basketball, 101.1 ± 41.3; p = .0005). No significant differences were noted for the number of saccades between sexes (males, 60.4 ± 20.3; females, 84.9 ± 41.8, p = .100) or in contrast acuity between all groups (p > .05). These results suggest the presence of sport-specific trends that may invalidate the comparison of postconcussion evaluation to generic baseline athlete eye movements.

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Gretchen Kerr, Anthony Battaglia, Ashley Stirling and Ahad Bandealy

The negative consequences associated with punishment, highlighted by researchers in the parenting and education domains, have stimulated a shift toward more developmentally appropriate methods of behavior modification. Despite the reported negative outcomes linked with punishment use, preliminary research in sport indicates that punishment, specifically in the form of exercise, remains a common strategy in this domain. The purpose of this study therefore was to explore interuniversity coaches’ perspectives on the use of exercise as punishment. Semistructured interviews with eight interuniversity coaches (four males and four females) were conducted. Data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Participant accounts revealed that exercise as punishment was implemented frequently in a variety of forms (e.g., push-ups and sprints). Perceived benefits for the use of exercise as punishment, such as performance motivation and team cohesion, as well as suggested alternative methods of behavioral modification were also reported. Findings are interpreted in accordance with punishment, shaming, and coach education research. Recommendations for future research and practice are suggested.

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Xavier D. Thompson and Brianna DiAntonio

An 18-year-old male hurdler reported to preparticipation physicals, with a history of anterior cruciate ligament, lateral collateral ligament, and posterior cruciate ligament sprain; medial meniscocapsular sprain; and biceps femoris tendon avulsion. The patient received full clearance from his surgeon, despite functional deficits. Rehabilitation and return-to-play decision making included analysis of patient-reported outcome scores and tests of symmetry and neuromuscular control. After graduated intervention and multiple batteries of assessments, the patient was allowed to return to full participation. The nature of this sport and the time between surgery and the intervention made thorough evaluation of function and graduated progression a necessity.

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Knud Ryom, Mads Ravn, Rune Düring and Kristoffer Henriksen

Interest in talent identification and the development of professional footballers has markedly increased in the past decade. Research in football has primarily focused on individual development and external factors affecting performance. In other sports, research from a holistic and ecological approach has examined successful environments, suggesting that such environments are not only unique, but also share features. Using a single case study design and a holistic ecological approach, this study investigated the youth department of the Belgium elite club KRC Genk (the Jos Vaessen Talent Academy). Results suggest that this environment, in many regards, is consistent with the shared features found in other successful environments in other sports (such as support of sporting goals by the wider environment and support for long-term development). However, three features were also observed as unique. These were (a) cultural awareness, openness, and sharing of knowledge; (b) the club’s ability to accommodate a broad diversity of players in the academy; and (c) an openness toward new ideas and learning on all levels of the organization. Collectively, our results indicate that Genk, in some respects, not only shares features with successful environments in other sports, but also bears unique features.

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Ellen J. Staurowsky

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Pete Van Mullem and Chris Croft

Coaching at the collegiate level requires a varied skill set in a competitive environment, where coaching positions have a high turnover rate. Preparing to work as a coach at the collegiate level is often self-driven and aligns with how coaches learn in other contexts. Research on the career progression of collegiate coaches is scant and tends to focus on gender differences or one’s desire to become a head coach. Recently, research has expanded to examine the preparation of coach developers and their role in guiding coach development activities in a variety of contexts. Therefore, guided by the literature on coach development, the role of the coach developer in collegiate sport, and insight gleaned from a descriptive study on the career path of collegiate head coaches, this best practices article offers practical recommendations for coach developers to best serve collegiate coaches along their coaching journey.