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Volume 17 (2024): Issue 2 (Jun 2024)

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Volume 19 (2024): Issue 6 (Jun 2024)

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Volume 32 (2024): Issue 3 (Jun 2024)

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Volume 18 (2024): Issue 2 (Jun 2024)

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Volume 46 (2024): Issue 3 (Jun 2024)

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Volume 41 (2024): Issue 2 (Jun 2024)

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Volume 38 (2024): Issue 2 (Jun 2024)

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Barriers and Facilitators to Including Students With Down Syndrome in Integrated Physical Education: Chilean Physical Educators’ Perspectives

Luiz Gustavo Teixeira Fabricio dos Santos, Fabián Arroyo-Rojas, Sheyla Martinez Rivera, Luis Felipe Castelli Correia de Campos, Lindsey A. Nowland, Wesley J. Wilson, and Justin A. Haegele

The purpose of this study was to explore Chilean physical educators’ perspectives on barriers and facilitators to students with Down syndrome experiencing inclusion in integrated physical education. Data were collected from a cohort of 91 physical educators, comprising 50 males and 41 females from various regions in Chile, who responded to an online survey between March 2023 to June 2023. A two-step coding protocol was used to analyze responses. Cumulatively, the respondents identified 350 barriers (3.84 per participant) and 393 facilitators (4.32 per participant), which they perceived to influence feelings of inclusion among students with Down syndrome. Predominantly, factors that centered around teachers themselves were emphasized as both facilitators and barriers, as well as the role of a welcoming environment and supportive peers. This study, the first within the Chilean context, demonstrates that teachers believe that inclusiveness predominantly stems from educators’ initiatives, complemented by the surrounding environment and peer interactions.

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Physical Educators’ Attitudes Toward Teaching Students With Disabilities After a Paralympic School Day Professional Development Program

Marie Leake, Martin E. Block, Abby Fines, and Cathy McKay

Purpose: This study aimed to examine physical educators’ attitudes toward teaching students with disabilities in general physical education after participating in a Paralympic School Day professional development program. Methods: Elementary through high school physical education teachers participated in a Paralympic School Day professional development program. Data from focus groups and written reflections were analyzed deductively and inductively using a three-step approach. Results: The analysis revealed five interrelated themes: (a) “you’re trying to accommodate everyone, and so it’s hard”; (b) “putting yourself in other people’s shoes”; (c) “I definitely want to use these ideas”; (d) “It made me think about all of my students”; and (e) “not talking is the hurtful action.” Discussion: Following the Paralympic School Day professional development program, physical educators described a shift in attitudes characterized by a desire to implement inclusive teaching practices and an enhanced focus on promoting conversations with individuals with disabilities.

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Teachers’ Beliefs and Dispositions Toward Change in a Social and Emotional Skills Development Program

Shannon A. Pennington, Kim C. Graber, Karen Lux Gaudreault, and Kevin Andrew Richards

Noncore subject teachers often experience marginalization due to perceptions that their work is undervalued. Social and emotional skill-focused continuous professional development can help teachers address the stress associated with marginalization. Purpose: Grounded in the integrative model for teacher change, this study examined the ways in which elementary-level noncore subject teachers’ dispositions toward change influenced their experiences with a social and emotional skills development intervention. Method: This study included two iterations of the program with a total of 21 elementary-level noncore subject teachers (e.g., physical education, art, and music) from three districts in the Midwestern United States. Data included a survey, semistructured interviews, document analysis, discussion board posts, observations, and field notes. Collaborative qualitative analysis was used to analyze multiple data sources line by line. Results: Marginalization and low perceived mattering were prevalent among participants. A positive disposition toward change enhanced the influence of the professional learning, and participants found the experience validating. Conclusions: Teachers of marginalized subjects need to feel seen and heard. A positive disposition toward change drew teachers to participate, and the camaraderie formed was a motivator for teachers who felt undervalued.