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Volume 17 (2024): Issue 1 (Mar 2024): Special Issue—Social Media and Sport Communication: Research Studies

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Volume 34 (2024): Issue 2 (Mar 2024)

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Volume 19 (2024): Issue 3 (Mar 2024)

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Volume 18 (2024): Issue 1 (Mar 2024)

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Volume 38 (2024): Issue 2 (Mar 2024)

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Social Media and Sport Research: Empirical Examinations Showcasing Diversity in Methods and Topics

Jimmy Sanderson and Gashaw Abeza

This commentary introduces the second of two special issues in the International Journal of Sport Communication centered on social media and sport. The empirical studies presented in this issue illustrate both the diversity of topics and methodological approaches utilized by researchers working at the intersection of social media and sport. Research articles in this issue analyze topics ranging from sport consumer behavior to online fan communities to coaches’ perceptions of activism-related content posted on team social media accounts. The research presented here also employs a variety of methodological approaches including experimental design, critical discourse analysis, rhetorical analysis, and applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Collectively, these studies offer a foundation on which future research in social media and sport can build to continue to enhance our understanding of social media’s impact on the sport world.

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Volume 41 (2024): Issue 1 (Mar 2024)

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Anti-Black Racism and Soccer in Canada: Is It Because I’m Black, Ref?

Paul Nya and Jay Scherer

This study critically examines the experiences of members of a sub-Saharan African men’s recreational soccer club with anti-Black racism in a Western Canadian city. Drawing from extensive ethnographic fieldwork, and working at the intersections of Critical Race Theory and Physical Cultural Studies, our analysis focuses on how team members navigate a racial hierarchy that privileges Whiteness and cements their status as outsiders through both overt and subtle forms of racism on the pitch, and the laborious, retraumatizing challenges of “proving” these racist incidents to those in positions of institutional power. We underline the need for anti-racist and anti-oppressive policies and training, and independent judiciaries to monitor and address racist incidents and systemic racism—and its intersections with other forms of oppression—in Canadian sport cultures.

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Association Between Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Occupation Activity Level, National Health Interview Survey—United States, 2020

Jasmine Y. Nakayama, Miriam E. Van Dyke, Tyler D. Quinn, and Geoffrey P. Whitfield

Background: Physical activity for any purpose counts toward meeting Physical Activity Guidelines (PAG). However, national surveillance systems traditionally focus on leisure-time physical activity. There is an incomplete understanding of the association between meeting PAG in leisure time and occupation activity level among US workers. Methods: We used cross-sectional 2020 National Health Interview Survey data to examine US adults aged 18–64 years who worked the week before the survey (n = 14,814). We estimated the proportion meeting aerobic and muscle-strengthening PAG in leisure time by occupation activity level (low, intermediate, and high). Using logistic regression, we examined the association between meeting PAG in leisure time and occupation activity level, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and stratified by hours worked. We compared the sociodemographic characteristics of adults working ≥40 hours (the previous week) in high-activity occupations to those in low- or intermediate-activity occupations. Results: Adults working in high-activity occupations were less likely to meet PAG in leisure time (26.1% [24.3–28.1]) versus those in low-activity (30.6% [29.1–32.2], P < .01) or intermediate-activity (32.4% [30.8–34.2]) occupations. In stratified, adjusted models, adults working ≥40 hours in low- and intermediate-activity occupations were 13% and 20%, respectively, more likely to meet PAG in leisure time versus those in high-activity occupations. Among those working ≥40 hours, adults in high-activity occupations were more likely to be Hispanic or Latino, male, younger, and have a high school education or lower compared with those in less active occupations. Conclusion: Traditional surveillance may underestimate meeting PAG among people working in high-activity occupations, potentially disproportionately affecting certain groups.

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Effects of Situated Game Teaching Through Set Plays on Badminton Tactical Knowledge, Technical Ability, and Game Performance Among Turkish Secondary School Students

Erhan Devrilmez, Weidong Li, Fatih Dervent, Mustafa Çabıtçı, and Senlin Chen

Background: The Situated Game Teaching Through Set Plays (SGTSP) model, a newly proposed curricular model, extends the previous game-based approaches by adopting the Theory of Situated Learning as a framework to focus on the relational and situational nature of the changing relations of all game parameters in a specific momentary game scenario. However, as a new game-based model, SGTSP warrants further empirical research investigations to establish its effectiveness at advancing student learning such as skill acquisition and game competence. Purpose: To examine the effects of the SGTSP curricular model on secondary school students’ tactical knowledge, technical ability, and game performance in badminton when compared with a technique-focused approach during a 10-lesson unit. Methods: A completely randomized block design with a repeated measure was used to address the research purpose. A sample of 158 sixth graders from eight classes at two Turkish middle schools (67 girls and 89 boys; M age = 12.62 ± 0.47) were assigned to either the SGTSP (n = 79 from four classes) or the technique-focused approach conditions (n = 79 from four classes) for the experiment. Assessments were conducted before and after the badminton instructional unit. The statistical models consisted of one of the four technical ability performances, components of game performance, or tactical knowledge as a dependent variable and eight independent variables: teacher, treatment, class nested within teacher and treatment, gender, skill levels, and three 2-way interactions between treatment, gender, and skill levels. A series of repeated-measure multivariate analyses of variance were conducted to analyze the data. Results: Participants in both groups improved tactical knowledge, forehand long serve, forehand clear, smash, and drop skills, and game performances from pre to post. Participants in the SGTSP condition showed significantly greater improvements ( η p 2 = .39 .96 ). Discussion and Conclusion: The findings of this study substantiated the positive effects of the SGTSP model on developing secondary school students’ badminton tactical knowledge, technical ability, and game performances in badminton compared with the traditional technique-focused approach.