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Erratum. Perceived Constraints to Pickleball Participation Among Black Older Adults

Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

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Impact of Secondary Organizational Socialization on North American, Asian, and European Early Career Faculty Members’ Delivery of Physical Education Teacher Education

Meghan Dennis, Seungsoo Baek, Adam M. Wolecki, Wonhee Lee, Natalia D. Molska, R. Tanner Ryan, and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

Purpose: To describe the impact of secondary organizational socialization on 10 early career faculty members’ (FMs) delivery of physical education teacher education (PETE). Method: The FMs worked in universities situated on three different continents. Data were collected with four qualitative techniques (formal interviews, written ideal PETE program, document analysis, and prerecorded film) and analyzed by using analytic induction and constant comparison. Findings: FMs delivered PETE that was a hybrid of the behavioristic, traditional/craft, critical-inquiry, and personalistic orientations to teacher education. The cultures and conditions in which FMs worked were mainly positive and favorable and aided them in delivering PETE. FMs coped with negative cultural elements and unfavorable conditions that constrained them through strategic compliance, strategic redefinition, or finding a new position. Conclusion: Findings were similar across continents and should help with efforts to improve the transition of neophyte FMs into the workplace.

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Perspectives on Inclusion in Physical Education From Faculty and Students at Three Physical Education Teacher Education Programs in Chile

Fabián Arroyo-Rojas and Samuel R. Hodge

Discourse about, and the preparation of teachers regarding, the inclusion of all students has been lacking in Latin America broadly, including Chile. The purpose of this study was to examine the perspectives of physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty members and undergraduate students on inclusion and social justice in Chile. Grounded in social constructionism, the research design of this qualitative inquiry was descriptive multiple case study. The 16 participants were PETE faculty—that is, two assistant professors and one adjunct faculty member (n = 3) and three heads of programs (n = 3)—as well as undergraduate students (n = 10) across three PETE programs in Chile. The primary data sources were 12 individual semistructured interviews with heads of the program and faculty and three focus group interviews with undergraduate students across programs. The qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis to draw on different themes capturing the perspectives on inclusion and social justice within the Chilean physical education curriculum. Findings were presented through themes and subthemes across PETE programs. Three major discussion themes are presented: (a) disability framed within a deficit model, (b) inclusion as an adapted pedagogical practice, and (c) inclusion as a rights-based model for equality of opportunities. We conclude, analytically, that a lack of critical critique of the deficit model of disability, adapted pedagogical practices alone, and sameness manifests forms of marginalization to students with disabilities in physical education.

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Strengthening Whole-of-School Physical Activity Models to Promote Physical Literacy: Moving Beyond a Component Approach

Paul Rukavina and Patricia Gremillion-Burdge

Whole-of-school approaches to physical activity and health promotion have the potential to promote physical literacy. However, for a variety of reasons there has not been widespread adoption of component whole-of-school frameworks to guide schools, such as the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. We argue that component frameworks have shortcomings and do not necessarily assist or support schools to take an approach that is consistent with how successful whole-of-school models or programs are created and built over time. In this paper, we argue that we need to apply guidance that resonates with stakeholders and stimulates schools to design their own unique whole-of-school physical activity model to provide equitable programming opportunities. We also present an argument on the need to incorporate improvement science and the use of social–ecological models to investigate the efficacy of this guidance model.

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Case-Conceptualization Practices in Sport and Performance Psychology

Matthew D. Bird, Elmer A. Castillo, and Patricia C. Jackman

Case conceptualization is an important stage in the sport and performance psychology (SPP) consulting process. The conceptualization of a case can influence a consultant’s understanding of the underpinning mechanisms contributing to a presenting concern, interventions selected to help a client, and the effectiveness of provided services. Guidelines for case conceptualization have been developed for SPP professionals, but little is known about how this activity is undertaken in practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the case-conceptualization methods and approaches of certified SPP professionals. Fifty-two certified mental performance consultants completed an online qualitative survey exploring how they conceptualized cases. Our findings suggested that SPP consultants viewed case conceptualization as an ongoing process, something that helps a consultant understand a client’s presenting concerns and guide any intervention plans, a collaboration between client and consultant, and a way to evaluate the effectiveness of their practice.

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Coingestion of Collagen With Whey Protein Prevents Postexercise Decline in Plasma Glycine Availability in Recreationally Active Men

Thorben Aussieker, Tom A.H. Janssen, Wesley J.H. Hermans, Andrew M. Holwerda, Joan M. Senden, Janneau M.X. van Kranenburg, Joy P.B. Goessens, Tim Snijders, and Luc J.C. van Loon

Whey protein ingestion during recovery from exercise increases myofibrillar but not muscle connective protein synthesis rates. It has been speculated that whey protein does not provide sufficient glycine to maximize postexercise muscle connective protein synthesis rates. In the present study, we assessed the impact of coingesting different amounts of collagen with whey protein as a nutritional strategy to increase plasma glycine availability during recovery from exercise. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, 14 recreationally active men (age: 26 ± 5 years; body mass index: 23.8 ± 2.1 kg·m−2) ingested in total 30 g protein, provided as whey protein with 0 g (WHEY), 5 g (WC05); 10 g (WC10), and 15 g (WC15) of collagen protein immediately after a single bout of resistance exercise. Blood samples were collected frequently over 6 hr of postexercise recovery to assess postprandial plasma amino acid kinetics and availability. Protein ingestion strongly increased plasma amino acid concentrations (p < .001) with no differences in plasma total amino acid availability between treatments (p > .05). The postprandial rise in plasma leucine and essential amino acid availability was greater in WHEY compared with the WC10 and WC15 treatments (p < .05). Plasma glycine and nonessential amino acid concentrations declined following whey protein ingestion but increased following collagen coingestion (p < .05). Postprandial plasma glycine availability averaged −8.9 ± 5.8, 9.2 ± 3.7, 23.1 ± 6.5, and 39.8 ± 11.0 mmol·360 min/L in WHEY, WC05, WC10, and WC15, respectively (incremental area under curve values, p < .05). Coingestion of a small amount of collagen (5 g) with whey protein (25 g) is sufficient to prevent the decline in plasma glycine availability during recovery from lower body resistance-type exercise in recreationally active men.

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The Midfoot Joint Complex (Foot Arch) Contributes to the Upper Body Position in Bipedal Walking and Coordinates With the Lower Limb Joints

Leonardo D. Barsante, Paula M.M. Arantes, Daniela V. Vaz, Fabricio A. Magalhães, Diego S. Carvalho, Aline C. Cruz, Renan A. Resende, Juliana M. Ocarino, Sérgio T. Fonseca, and Thales R. Souza

This study estimated the contribution of the midfoot joint complex (MJC) kinematics to the pelvis anterior–posterior positions during the stance phase of walking and investigated whether the MJC is functionally coordinated with the lower limb joints to maintain similar pelvic positions across steps. Hip, knee, ankle, and MJC sagittal angles were measured in 11 nondisabled participants during walking. The joints’ contributions to pelvic positions were computed through equations derived from a link-segment model. Functional coordination across steps was identified when the MJC contribution to pelvic position varied and the summed contributions of other joints varied in the opposite direction (strong negative covariations [r ≤ −.7] in stance phase instants). We observed that the MJC plantarflexion (arch raising) during the midstance and late stance leads the pelvis backward, avoiding excessive forward displacement. The MJC was the second joint that contributed most to the pelvis positions (around 18% of all joints’ contributions), after the ankle joint. The MJC and ankle were the joints that were most frequently coordinated with the other joints (≅70% of the stance phase duration). The findings suggest that the MJC is part of the kinematic chain that determines pelvis positions during walking and is functionally coordinated with the lower limb joints.

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No Association Between Injury-Related Fear and Isokinetic Quadriceps Strength in Individuals With a History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Caitlin Brinkman, Elaine Reiche, Francesca Genoese, Johanna Hoch, and Shelby Baez

Context: Injury-related fear and quadriceps strength are independently associated with secondary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. It is not known whether injury-related fear and quadriceps strength are associated, despite their individual predictive capabilities of secondary ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between injury-related fear and quadriceps strength in individuals at least 1 year after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Forty participants between the ages of 18 and 35 years at least 1 year post unilateral primary ACLR. Participants completed the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11 (TSK-11) and a standard isokinetic quadriceps strength assessment using the Biodex Isokinetic Dynamometer. Pearson Product-Moment correlations were used to examine the linear association between the TSK-11 scores and peak torque (in nanometers per kilogram) for each limb and between the TSK-11 scores and limb symmetry indices for each limb. Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficients (r) were interpreted as very high (.90–1.00), high (.70–.90), moderate (.50–.70), low (.30–.50), and no correlation (.00–.30). Results: The average TSK-11 score was 18.2 (5.3), average ACLR peak quadriceps torque was 1.9 (0.50) N·m/kg, average contralateral peak quadriceps torque was 2.3 (0.48) N·m/kg, and average limb symmetry index was 85.3% (12.6%). There was no statistically significant correlation between the TSK-11 and peak quadriceps torque on the ACLR limb (r = .12, P = .46), the TSK-11 and contralateral limb (r = .29, P = .07), or the TSK-11 and limb symmetry index (r = –.18, P = .27). Conclusions: There was no association between kinesiophobia and peak isokinetic quadriceps strength in individuals at least 1 year post-ACLR. Both factors, independently, have been shown to influence risk of secondary injury in patients after ACLR.

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Prepandemic Feasibility of Tele-Exercise as an Alternative Delivery Mode for an Evidence-Based, Tai Ji Quan Fall-Prevention Intervention for Older Adults

Dina L. Jones, Maura Robinson, Terry Kit Selfe, Lucinda Barnes, McKinzey Dierkes, Samantha Shawley-Brzoska, Douglas J. Myers, and Sara Wilcox

There is a critical need for fall-prevention interventions to reach medically underserved, hard-to-reach, rural older adults. The evidence-based Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance (TJQMBB) program reduces falls in older adults. This pre-COVID-19 pandemic study assessed the feasibility and impact of a 16-week tele-TJQMBB intervention in older adults. Instructors led six tele-TJQMBB classes via Zoom for 52 older adults (mean age ± SD 68.5 ± 7.7 years) at one academic and four community sites. Nearly all (97%) planned sessions were delivered. Average attendance was 61%. There were no adverse events. Fidelity was fair to good (mean 67%). Forty-one percent of sessions experienced technical disruptions. Participants improved their gait speed, balance, lower-extremity strength, and body mass index. Tele-TJQMBB was feasible with a positive impact on outcomes. This study was the first step toward establishing an additional delivery mode that could potentially expand TJQMBB’s reach and maintenance.

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Sport Science, Geopolitics, and How Each of Us Can Make a Difference

Jos J. de Koning, Carl Foster, David B. Pyne, Ralph Beneke, and Øyvind Sandbakk