Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 7,290 items for :

  • Physical Education and Coaching x
Clear All
Restricted access

Erik Sesbreno, Gary Slater, Margo Mountjoy and Stuart D.R. Galloway

The monitoring of body composition is common in sports given the association with performance. Surface anthropometry is often preferred when monitoring changes for its convenience, practicality, and portability. However, anthropometry does not provide valid estimates of absolute lean tissue in elite athletes. The aim of this investigation was to develop anthropometric models for estimating fat-free mass (FFM) and skeletal muscle mass (SMM) using an accepted reference physique assessment technique. Sixty-four athletes across 18 sports underwent surface anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessment. Anthropometric models for estimating FFM and SMM were developed using forward selection multiple linear regression analysis and contrasted against previously developed equations. Most anthropometric models under review performed poorly compared with DXA. However, models derived from athletic populations such as the Withers equation demonstrated a stronger correlation with DXA estimates of FFM (r = .98). Equations that incorporated skinfolds with limb girths were more effective at explaining the variance in DXA estimates of lean tissue (Sesbreno FFM [R 2 = .94] and Lee SMM [R 2 = .94] models). The Sesbreno equation could be useful for estimating absolute indices of lean tissue across a range of physiques if an accepted option like DXA is inaccessible. Future work should explore the validity of the Sesbreno model across a broader range of physiques common to athletic populations.

Restricted access

Liam Sayer, Nidia Rodriguez-Sanchez, Paola Rodriguez-Giustiniani, Christopher Irwin, Danielle McCartney, Gregory R. Cox, Stuart D.R. Galloway and Ben Desbrow

This study investigated the effect of drinking rate on fluid retention of milk and water following exercise-induced dehydration. In Part A, 12 male participants lost 1.9% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water or low-fat milk equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Beverages were ingested over 30 or 90 min, resulting in four beverage treatments: water 30 min, water 90 min, milk 30 min, and milk 90 min. In Part B, 12 participants (nine males and three females) lost 2.0% ± 0.3% body mass through cycle exercise on four occasions. Following exercise, plain water equal to the volume of sweat lost during exercise was provided. Water was ingested over 15 min (DR15), 45 min (DR45), or 90 min (DR90), with either DR15 or DR45 repeated. In both trials, nude body mass, urine volume, urine specific gravity and osmolality, plasma osmolality, and subjective ratings of gastrointestinal symptoms were obtained preexercise and every hour for 3 hr after the onset of drinking. In Part A, no effect of drinking rate was observed on the proportion of fluid retained, but milk retention was greater (p < .01) than water (water 30 min: 57% ± 16%, water 90 min: 60% ± 20%, milk 30 min: 83% ± 6%, and milk 90 min: 85% ± 7%). In Part B, fluid retention was greater in DR90 (57% ± 13%) than DR15 (50% ± 11%, p < .05), but this was within test–retest variation determined from the repeated trials (coefficient of variation: 17%). Within the range of drinking rates investigated the nutrient composition of a beverage has a more pronounced impact on fluid retention than the ingestion rate.

Restricted access

Michelle S. Rockwell, Madlyn I. Frisard, Janet W. Rankin, Jennifer S. Zabinsky, Ryan P. Mcmillan, Wen You, Kevin P. Davy and Matthew W. Hulver

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of fall season vitamin D3 supplementation on strength/power, body composition, and anabolic hormones in swimmers with optimal vitamin D status at summer’s end. Male and female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I swimmers (N = 19) with optimal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] randomly received 5,000 IU of vitamin D3 (VITD) or placebo (PLA) daily for 12 weeks while participating in swimming and strength and conditioning training (August–November). Before and after the intervention, the participants underwent blood sampling for analysis of serum 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone, total testosterone, free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and strength/power testing (bench press, squat, dead lift, standing broad jump, vertical jump, and dips and pull-ups). Sex was used as a covariate for analyses. The 25(OH)D was decreased by 44% in PLA (p < .05) and increased by 8% in VITD over the 12 weeks. Fat-free mass increased in VITD (56.4–59.1 kg; p < .05), but not PLA (59.4–59.7 kg; p < .01). Significant Group × Time interaction effects were observed for dead lift (F = 21.577, p < .01) and vertical jump (F = 11.219, p < .01), but no other strength/power tests. Total testosterone decreased similarly in both groups, but free testosterone decreased and sex hormone-binding globulin increased only in PLA (p < .01). There were no group differences or changes in insulin-like growth factor 1 with the intervention. The findings suggest that vitamin D supplementation is an efficacious strategy to maintain 25(OH)D during the fall season training and to enhance some aspects of strength/power and fat-free mass in swimmers. Further research on the relationship between vitamin D and anabolic hormones is needed.

Restricted access

Andrew M. Holwerda, Freek G. Bouwman, Miranda Nabben, Ping Wang, Janneau van Kranenburg, Annemie P. Gijsen, Jatin G. Burniston, Edwin C.M. Mariman and Luc J.C. van Loon

Physical activity increases muscle protein synthesis rates. However, the impact of exercise on the coordinated up- and/or downregulation of individual protein synthesis rates in skeletal muscle tissue remains unclear. The authors assessed the impact of exercise on mixed muscle, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates as well as individual protein synthesis rates in vivo in rats. Adult Lewis rats either remained sedentary (n = 3) or had access to a running wheel (n = 3) for the last 2 weeks of a 3-week experimental period. Deuterated water was injected and subsequently administered in drinking water over the experimental period. Blood and soleus muscle were collected and used to assess bulk mixed muscle, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and individual muscle protein synthesis rates using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (i.e., dynamic proteomic profiling). Wheel running resulted in greater myofibrillar (3.94 ± 0.26 vs. 3.03 ± 0.15%/day; p < .01) and mitochondrial (4.64 ± 0.24 vs. 3.97 ± 0.26%/day; p < .05), but not mixed muscle (2.64 ± 0.96 vs. 2.38 ± 0.62%/day; p = .71) protein synthesis rates, when compared with the sedentary condition. Exercise impacted the synthesis rates of 80 proteins, with the difference from the sedentary condition ranging between −64% and +420%. Significantly greater synthesis rates were detected for F1-ATP synthase, ATP synthase subunit alpha, hemoglobin, myosin light chain-6, and synaptopodin-2 (p < .05). The skeletal muscle protein adaptive response to endurance-type exercise involves upregulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis rates, but it is highly coordinated as reflected by the up- and downregulation of various individual proteins across different bulk subcellular protein fractions.

Restricted access

Hunter S. Waldman, Brandon D. Shepherd, Brendan Egan and Matthew J. McAllister

In the present study, our team aimed to investigate the effects of acute ingestion of a ketone salt (KS) supplement on the cognitive performance in healthy college-aged males during a dual-stress challenge (DSC). Following a peak oxygen uptake test and DSC familiarization, 16 males completed a DSC while cycling at 60% of their respective peak oxygen uptake after ingesting either a commercially available racemic (D- and L-)β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) KS (0.38 g/kg body mass) or a placebo, using a triple-blinded, crossover, and counterbalanced design. The participants consumed the KS or placebo at −60 and −15 min prior to the start of the DSC. Heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and blood β-OHB and glucose were sampled throughout. The DSC consisted of a mental arithmetic challenge and a modified Stroop Color Word, which alternated every 2 min for 20 min. Upon completion of the DSC, responses for correct, incorrect, and no responses were recorded for the mental arithmetic challenge and Stroop Color Word. Blood β-OHB was elevated with KS by −15 min and remained so throughout (p < .001), peaking at 0.76 ± 0.32 mM. Blood glucose was lower with KS compared with the placebo at −15 and 10 min by 9% and 5%, respectively (both ps < .05). There were no differences between the treatments for heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, mental arithmetic challenge, or Stroop Color Word. Overall, this study suggests that KSs are not effective aids for enhancing cognitive performance during a DSC, which might partially be explained by the inability of currently available commercial KS supplements to elevate β-OHB blood concentrations above ∼1.0 mM.

Restricted access

George Wilson, Jerry Hill, Daniel Martin, James P. Morton and Graeme L. Close

Flat jockeys in Great Britain (GB) are classified as apprentices if they are aged less than 26 years and/or have ridden less than 95 winners. To gain experience, apprentices are allocated a weight allowance of up to 7 lb (3.2 kg). Given that there is no off-season in GB flat horseracing, jockeys are required to maintain their racing weight all year round. In light of recent work determining that current apprentices are considerably heavier than previous generations and that smaller increases have been made in the minimum weight, the aim of this study was to assess if the minimum weight in GB was achievable. To make the minimum weight (50.8 kg) with the maximal weight allowance requires a body mass of ∼46.6 kg while maintaining a fat mass >2.5 kg (the lowest fat mass previously reported in weight-restricted males). Thirty-two male apprentice jockeys were assessed for body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean (SD) total mass and fat mass were 56 (2.9) kg and 7.2 (1.8) kg, respectively. Given that the lowest theoretical body mass for this group was 51.2 (2.3) kg, only one of 32 jockeys was deemed feasible to achieve the minimum weight with their current weight allowance and maintaining fat mass >2.5 kg. Furthermore, urine osmolality of 780 (260) mOsmol/L was seen, with 22 (out of 32) jockeys classed as dehydrated (>700 mOsmols/L), indicating that body mass would be higher when euhydrated. Additionally, we observed that within new apprentice jockeys licensed during this study (N = 41), only one jockey was able to achieve the minimum weight. To facilitate the goal of achieving race weight with minimal disruptions to well-being, the authors’ data suggest that the minimum weight for GB apprentices should be raised.

Restricted access

Kapria-Jad Josaphat, Vicky Drapeau, David Thivel and Marie-Eve Mathieu

Background: High-intensity exercise can have an anorectic impact, leading to negative energy balance. Several studies have reported that the practice of physical activity could also cause a shift in perceptions and preferences, causing a change in food intakes. Objective: This study aimed to question to what extent the timing of exercise in relation to a meal could have an impact on olfaction and gustation, appetite, and food choices. Methods: Twelve males aged 25 (4) years with a body mass index of 22.4 (2.0) kg/m2 attended two experimental visits in a counterbalanced fashion. The participants consumed a standardized breakfast between 7:00 and 7:30 a.m. and were subjected to smell and taste tests upon arrival at the laboratory (8:30 a.m.). In the EX9:40 visit, the participants performed a 30-min exercise session (70% of maximum oxygen uptake) at 9:40 a.m., followed by a 90-min sedentary break. In EX10:30, the participants first took part in the 90-min sedentary break and then performed the 30-min exercise session at 10:30 a.m. Taste and smell tests were performed again at 11:40 a.m., immediately followed by an ad libitum buffet-style meal. Visual analog scales were used to report appetite sensations during the session and satiety quotients around the lunch. Results: There was no difference in energy intakes between the EX9:40 (596 [302] kcal) and EX10:30 (682 [263] kcal) conditions (p = .459). There was no condition effect for the taste and smell sensations (all ps > .05), appetite sensation, or satiety quotients around the meal (all ps > .05). Conclusion: Exercise timing in the morning had no effect on taste and smell perceptions, appetite sensations, or energy intakes.

Open access

Emma L. Sweeney, Daniel J. Peart, Irene Kyza, Thomas Harkes, Jason G. Ellis and Ian H. Walshe

Experimental sleep restriction (SR) has demonstrated reduced insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals. Exercise is well-known to be beneficial for metabolic health. A single bout of exercise has the capacity to increase insulin sensitivity for up to 2 days. Therefore, the current study aimed to determine if sprint interval exercise could attenuate the impairment in insulin sensitivity after one night of SR in healthy males. Nineteen males were recruited for this randomized crossover study which consisted of four conditions—control, SR, control plus exercise, and sleep restriction plus exercise. Time in bed was 8 hr (2300–0700) in the control conditions and 4 hr (0300–0700) in the SR conditions. Conditions were separated by a 1-week entraining period. Participants slept at home, and compliance was assessed using wrist actigraphy. Following the night of experimental sleep, participants either conducted sprint interval exercise or rested for the equivalent duration. An oral glucose tolerance test was then conducted. Blood samples were obtained at regular intervals for measurement of glucose and insulin. Insulin concentrations were higher in SR than control (p = .022). Late-phase insulin area under the curve was significantly lower in sleep restriction plus exercise than SR (862 ± 589 and 1,267 ± 558; p = .004). Glucose area under the curve was not different between conditions (p = .207). These findings suggest that exercise improves the late postprandial response following a single night of SR.

Restricted access

David C. Nieman, Giuseppe Valacchi, Laurel M. Wentz, Francesca Ferrara, Alessandra Pecorelli, Brittany Woodby, Camila A. Sakaguchi and Andrew Simonson

This double-blinded, placebo controlled, randomized crossover trial investigated the influence of 2-week mixed flavonoid versus placebo supplementation on oxinflammation markers after a 75-km cycling time trial in 22 cyclists (42.3 ± 1.7 years). Blood samples were collected before and after the 2-week supplementation, and then 0 hr, 1.5 hr, and 21 hr post 75-km cycling (176 ± 5.4 min, 73.4 ±2.0% maximal oxygen consumption). The supplement provided 678-mg flavonoids with quercetin (200 mg), green tea catechins (368 mg, 180-mg epigallocatechin gallate), and anthocyanins (128 mg) from bilberry extract, with caffeine, vitamin C, and omega-3 fatty acids added as adjuvants. Blood samples were analyzed for blood leukocyte counts, oxinflammation biomarkers, including 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and peripheral blood mononuclear mRNA expression for cyclooxygenease-2 and glutathione peroxidase. Each of the blood biomarkers was elevated postexercise (time effects, all ps < .01), with lower plasma levels for 4-hydroxynonenal (at 21-hr postexercise) in flavonoid versus placebo (interaction effect, p = .008). Although elevated postexercise, no trial differences for the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (p = .539) or peripheral blood mononuclear mRNA expression for cyclooxygenease-2 (p = .322) or glutathione peroxidase (p = .839) were shown. Flavonoid supplementation prior to intensive exercise decreased plasma peroxidation and oxidative damage, as determined by 4-hydroxynonenal. Postexercise increases were similar between the flavonoid and placebo trials for peripheral blood mononuclear mRNA expression for cyclooxygenease-2 and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 related gene glutathione peroxidase (NFE2L2). The data support the strategy of flavonoid supplementation to mitigate postexercise oxidative stress in endurance athletes.

Restricted access

Sally P. Waterworth, Connor C. Spencer, Aaron L. Porter and James P. Morton

The authors tested the hypothesis that perception of carbohydrate (CHO) availability augments exercise capacity in conditions of reduced CHO availability. Nine males completed a sleep-low train model comprising evening glycogen-depleting cycling followed by an exhaustive cycling protocol the next morning in the fasted state (30 min steady state at 95% lactate threshold followed by 1-min intervals at 80% peak power output until exhaustion). After the evening depletion protocol and prior to sleeping, subjects consumed (a) a known CHO intake of 6 g/kg body mass (TRAIN HIGH) or (b) a perceived comparable CHO intake but 0 g/kg body mass (PERCEPTION) or a known train-low condition of 0 g/kg body mass (TRAIN LOW). The TRAIN HIGH and PERCEPTION trials were conducted double blind. During steady state, average blood glucose and CHO oxidation were significantly higher in TRAIN HIGH (4.01 ± 0.56 mmol/L; 2.17 ± 0.70 g/min) versus both PERCEPTION (3.30 ± 0.57 mmol/L; 1.69 ± 0.64 g/min, p < .05) and TRAIN LOW (3.41 ± 0.74 mmol/L; 1.61 ± 0.59 g/min, p < .05). Exercise capacity was significantly different between all pairwise comparisons (p < .05), where TRAIN LOW (8 ± 8 min) < PERCEPTION (12 ± 6 min) < TRAIN HIGH (22 ± 9 min). Data demonstrate that perception of CHO availability augments high-intensity intermittent exercise capacity under sleep-low, train-low conditions, though this perception does not restore exercise capacity to that of CHO consumption. Such data have methodological implications for future research designs and may also have practical applications for athletes who deliberately practice elements of training in CHO-restricted states.