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A Note from the Editors

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship and Melinda Solmon

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A Note from the Editors

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship and Melinda Solmon

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A Note from the Editors

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship and Melinda Solmon

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A Note from the Editors

Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship and Melinda Solmon

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Chapter 3: Student Teachers’ Implementation of Model-Based Instruction: Facilitators and Inhibitors

Rachel Gurvitch, Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship, Michael W. Metzler, and Jacalyn L. Lund

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A Content Analysis of Qualitative Research in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education from 1998 to 2008

Michael A. Hemphill, Andrew R. Richards, Thomas J. Templin, and Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship

Previous reviews of research have documented the increasing use of qualitative inquiry in physical education. In this research note, the authors present a content analysis of qualitative research articles published between 1998 and 2008 in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education (JTPE). A total of 110 empirical articles were published that included a qualitative component, 38.2% of those used mixed methods. Results include analyses of types of qualitative research, research focus, theoretical frameworks, data collection techniques, trustworthiness techniques, and participants. The Research Authorship Score revealed that qualitative research tends to rely on teams of researchers in the conduct of studies. By extending previous work, this study reveals that qualitative research continues to play a significant role in research on physical education.

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Understanding Differences in Role Stressors, Resilience, and Burnout in Teacher/Coaches and Non-Coaching Teachers

K. Andrew R. Richards, Thomas J. Templin, Chantal Levesque-Bristol, and Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship

The constructs of role stressors, burnout, and resilience have been the topic of numerous research studies in physical education and education more generally. Specific to physical education, much effort has been devoted to the study of teacher/coach role conflict. However, no prior studies have examined how role stressors, burnout, and resilience experienced by teacher/coaches differ from what is experienced by noncoaching teachers. Using role theory as a guiding framework, this study sought to examine differences in role stressors, burnout, and resilience among teacher/coaches and noncoaching teachers from core (e.g., mathematics, language arts) and noncore (e.g., physical education, music) subjects. Analyses were conducted using 2 × 2 (coaching status × subject affiliation) Factorial ANOVAs. While some group differences are highlighted, overall the results suggest that there are more similarities than differences among teacher/coaches and noncoaching teachers. These findings suggest that it is not safe to assume that dual role teacher/coaches will always experience more role stress and burnout than noncoaching teachers. Additional research is needed to more fully understand the implications of being a dual role teacher/coach.