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Katie E. Misener, Kathy Babiak, Gareth Jones, and Iain Lindsey

The study of interorganizational relationships in amateur sport has developed significantly over the past 30 years alongside rising expectations for multisector integration between sport organizations and other partners. This stems from sport organizations seeking innovative ways to achieve their mission and neoliberal government policies adding institutional pressure for interorganizational cooperation. This review paper discusses the wider cultural and political forces that shape the drive for legitimacy through partnerships across sector boundaries and outlines the theoretical influences on interorganizational relationship research in amateur sport between economic and behavioral paradigms. In addition to considering how prevailing frameworks and findings inform the current body of knowledge in sport management, we critically reflect on implicit assumptions underpinning this work given that partnerships now saturate the discourse of sport management policy and practice. Our review questions whether reality lines up with our “great expectations,” and explores what limitations and opportunities remain for future interorganizational relationships research in amateur sport.

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Kathy Babiak, Brian Mills, Scott Tainsky, and Matthew Juravich

This study explored the philanthropic landscape of professional athletes and their charitable foundations. This research also investigated factors influencing the formation of philanthropic foundations among this group of individuals. First, data were collected to identify athletes in four professional North American sport leagues who had formed charitable foundations. Then, 36 interviews were conducted with athletes, foundation directors, league and team executives and a sport agent to explore the motives and beliefs about philanthropy in professional sport. Using the theory of planned behavior, this paper identified the factors considered in the formation of charitable foundations in this unique group, primarily focusing on attitudes (altruistic and self-interested), perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, self-identity and moral obligation as antecedents to athlete philanthropic activity. The paper also discusses the unique context in which these individuals operate, some of the particular constraints they face, and identifies opportunities for athlete foundations and their partners.

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Kathy Babiak, Jennifer Bruening, Jeremy Jordan, and Sonja Lilienthal

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Rob Ammon, Kathy Babiak, Lisa A. Kihl, and Daniel P. Mahony

Edited by Lucie Thibault

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Kathy Babiak, Robert Baker, Jennifer Bruening, Matthew Juravich, Lisa Kihl, and Marissa Stevenson

Edited by Jeremy S. Jordan

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Kathy Babiak, Jennifer Bruening, Jeremy Jordan, and Sonja Lilienthal

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Kathy Babiak, Robert Baker, Jennifer Bruening, Matthew Juravich, and Lisa Kihl

Edited by Jeremy S. Jordan

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Seung Pil Lee, T. Bettina Cornwell, and Kathy Babiak

The objective of this study is to develop an instrument to measure the social impact of sport. While there is a rich literature suggesting and measuring the ways in which sport contributes to society, no broad, encompassing scale has been developed. A measure of this type is useful if sport initiatives are to gain social, political and financial support, especially in the form of corporate sponsorship. The proposed “Social Impact of Sport Scale” includes the dimensions of social capital, collective identities, health literacy, well-being and human capital. In addition to development of a detailed 75 item composite scale stemming largely from past measurement, a shorter set of global measures is also examined. A convenience sample of university students is used in scale development as well as a partial test of the scale in context. Results find support for the detailed scale and for the short global measure instrument. In addition, the partial test of the scale in a context of sport experience relevant to students is reported. The value of the scale in use and areas of future research are discussed.

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Rob Ammon, Kathy Babiak, Dick Irwin, and Daniel F. Mahony

Edited by Lucie Thibault

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Kathy Babiak, Jennifer Bruening, Jeremy Jordan, and Sonja Lilienthal

Edited by Carol A. Barr