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Exploring Dimensions of Marginality: Reflecting on the Life Histories of Physical Education Teachers

Andrew C. Sparkes, Thomas J. Templin, and Paul G. Schempp

For all schools, the priority item always to be on the agenda, is the quality of life in the workplace—its assessment and improvement. Creating a satisfying place of work for the individuals who inhabit schools is good in its own right, but it appears also to be necessary to maintain a productive educational environment. (Goodlad, 1983, p. 59)

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Matching the Self: The Paradoxical Case and Life History of a Late Career Teacher/Coach

Thomas J. Templin, Bevan Grant, Andrew Sparkes, and Paul Schempp

This case study focuses on a late career, male teacher/coach and reveals the multidimensionality of his life and career. It demonstrates the influence of significant career and life events, as well as the social context in which the teacher/coach works. Overall, a life history approach describes the paradox of the employment/accommodation of a veteran elementary teacher as a physical educator at the secondary school in which he coaches. This study reveals the marginality of physical education and its teachers at the secondary school level in contrast to the importance of interscholastic athletics and those who serve in varsity coaching roles. The study shows how the teacher studied is both a good-fit and a weak-fit stayer (Yee, 1990). Equally, it demonstrates how one’s conception of self (Nias, 1985) relates to professional and personal circumstance. Finally, the research demonstrates the value of and need for biographical research in sport pedagogy.

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Promoting Quality Undergraduate Education in Kinesiology

Thomas J. Templin, Jason R. Carter, and Kim C. Graber

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An Analysis of State Physical Education Policies

Bryan A. McCullick, Thomas Baker, Phillip D. Tomporowski, Thomas J. Templin, Karen Lux, and Tiffany Isaac

The purpose of this study was to analyze state school-based physical education (SBPE) policies’ text and the resulting legal implications. A textualist approach to the legal method of Statutory Interpretation framed the data analysis. Findings revealed the difficulty of determining with clarity a majority of PE statutes and it is probable that based on current wording, courts could not play a role in interpreting these statutes, thus leaving interpretation to educational authorities. Significant variability of how authorities interpret statutes increases the challenge of consistent interpretation or adherence to the NASPE Guidelines for Quality Physical Education and whether meaningful policy study can be conducted to determine if SBPE makes an impact.

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Factors Associated With High School Physical Education Teachers’ Adoption of a Supplemental Online Instructional System (iPE)

Chad M. Killian, Amelia Mays Woods, Kim C. Graber, and Thomas J. Templin

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate factors associated with high school physical education (PE) teachers’ adoption of a supplemental online instructional system. Method: Semistructured, open-ended phone interviews with 28 high school PE teachers were used as the primary data collection method. All teachers were using or had used a supplemental online instructional system at the time of the study. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) guided the directed content analysis. Results: Four main categories were generated, including perceived programmatic, instructional, and inclusivity improvements; minimal personal and student usage effort; school and curriculum provider support facilitated use; and administrators’ dictated long-term use. Discussion/Conclusion: The results aligned well with the UTAUT and served to situate the theory within the secondary PE context. The participants’ perceptions and experiences were also contradictory to much of the current research on teachers’ technology adoption in PE and K–12 education, more generally.

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A Content Analysis of Qualitative Research in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education from 1998 to 2008

Michael A. Hemphill, Andrew R. Richards, Thomas J. Templin, and Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship

Previous reviews of research have documented the increasing use of qualitative inquiry in physical education. In this research note, the authors present a content analysis of qualitative research articles published between 1998 and 2008 in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education (JTPE). A total of 110 empirical articles were published that included a qualitative component, 38.2% of those used mixed methods. Results include analyses of types of qualitative research, research focus, theoretical frameworks, data collection techniques, trustworthiness techniques, and participants. The Research Authorship Score revealed that qualitative research tends to rely on teams of researchers in the conduct of studies. By extending previous work, this study reveals that qualitative research continues to play a significant role in research on physical education.

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Understanding Differences in Role Stressors, Resilience, and Burnout in Teacher/Coaches and Non-Coaching Teachers

K. Andrew R. Richards, Thomas J. Templin, Chantal Levesque-Bristol, and Bonnie Tjeerdsma Blankenship

The constructs of role stressors, burnout, and resilience have been the topic of numerous research studies in physical education and education more generally. Specific to physical education, much effort has been devoted to the study of teacher/coach role conflict. However, no prior studies have examined how role stressors, burnout, and resilience experienced by teacher/coaches differ from what is experienced by noncoaching teachers. Using role theory as a guiding framework, this study sought to examine differences in role stressors, burnout, and resilience among teacher/coaches and noncoaching teachers from core (e.g., mathematics, language arts) and noncore (e.g., physical education, music) subjects. Analyses were conducted using 2 × 2 (coaching status × subject affiliation) Factorial ANOVAs. While some group differences are highlighted, overall the results suggest that there are more similarities than differences among teacher/coaches and noncoaching teachers. These findings suggest that it is not safe to assume that dual role teacher/coaches will always experience more role stress and burnout than noncoaching teachers. Additional research is needed to more fully understand the implications of being a dual role teacher/coach.

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Experiential Learning Through a Physical Activity Program for Children With Disabilities

K. Andrew R. Richards, Andrew D. Eberline, Sookhenlall Padaruth, and Thomas J. Templin

Service-learning has become a popular pedagogical tool to promote academic and civic learning. One form of service-learning provides physical activity for underrepresented community groups, including children with disabilities. Using experiential learning theory, the purpose of this descriptive case study was to evaluate college students’ experiences in a physical activity-based service learning program for children with disabilities. Through convenience sampling, 97 program participants (82 female, 15 male), most of whom were White (N = 85), were recruited for participation. Data included a pre- and postsurvey of civic learning, participant interviews, reflective journaling, and program observations. Qualitative data were analyzed using constant comparison and inductive analysis, and quantitative data were analyzed using Mixed ANOVAs. Results revealed that the program resulted in enhanced civic and academic learning. Themes included making a difference, academic and career connections, emotional and personal growth, and program reflection. Implications of the study and future directions for research are discussed.

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Another Decade of Qualitative Research in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education

Shelby E. Ison, Kevin Andrew Richards, Michael A. Hemphill, and Thomas J. Templin

Background: Over the past several decades, scholars have regularly reviewed qualitative research published in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, among other outlets, to understand the developing role of qualitative methods in physical education and sport pedagogy. In this review, the authors present a descriptive and thematic analysis of qualitative research articles published between 2009 and 2019, extending previous reviews. Methods: A total of 137 empirical articles were published that included a qualitative component (38.48%). This included purely qualitative studies (28.37%) as well as those using mixed methods (10.11%). Results: Descriptive results include analyses of article classifications, authorship, participants, theoretical/conceptual frameworks, qualitative methodologies, data collection methods, and data analysis and trustworthiness strategies. Inductive analysis of the 137 qualitative containing articles resulted in six themes and corresponding subthemes of research foci. Conclusions: Suggestions for future submissions to the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education are also presented.

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Physical Education Teacher Education in Kinesiology: Past, Present, and Future

Melinda A. Solmon, Kim C. Graber, Amelia Mays Woods, Nancy I. Williams, Thomas J. Templin, Sarah L. Price, and Alison Weimer

This paper evolved from a panel discussion presented at the 2020 American Kinesiology Association Leadership Workshop focused on promoting physical activity through Kinesiology teaching and outreach. The authors consider the role of Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) in promoting physical activity by examining the historical role that PETE has played in what are now Departments of Kinesiology, the status of PETE programs today, and how the future of PETE programs can impact the future of the discipline of Kinesiology. The challenges and barriers that PETE programs face are presented. The role of PETE programs in research institutions is examined, and case studies are presented that demonstrate the complexities the academic units face regarding allocating resources to PETE programs. The consequences of program termination are considered, and the authors then make a case that PETE programs are important to the broader discipline of Kinesiology. The authors conclude by encouraging innovative solutions that can be developed to help PETE programs thrive.