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Ketra Armstrong, George B. Cunningham, Timothy D. DeSchriver, Mark R. Lyberger, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Dan Mason, Aubrey Kent, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Michael Sagas, Marlene Dixon, Aubrey Kent, and Brian A. Turner

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of internships on students’ career-related affect and intentions. Data were gathered from 138 upper-level undergraduate sport management students (71 interns, 67 noninterns). A doubly multivariate repeated measures model indicated that, although they did not differ at the beginning of the internship, interns had less positive attitudes toward the profession than did noninterns at the end of the internship. Structural equation modeling indicated that affective occupational commitment fully mediated the relationship between anticipated career satisfaction and intentions to enter the profession. The results contribute to the extant literature by demonstrating that internships can influence career-related affect and intentions.

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Jon Welty Peachey, George B. Cunningham, Alexis Lyras, Adam Cohen, and Jennifer Bruening

The purpose of this research project was to examine the impact of participating in a sport-for-peace event and one’s social dominance orientation on prejudice and change agent self-efficacy. In Study 1, participants (n = 136) completed questionnaires both before and following their participation in a sport-for-peace event. The event was designed to ensure both high levels of and quality intergroup contact, with interactions confirmed through a manipulation check. Results from the doubly repeated measures analysis of variance indicate a significant decrease in prejudice and a significant increase in change agent self-efficacy. Social dominance orientation did not influence the nature of these changes. In Study 2, the authors conducted focus group interviews with 27 participants to better understand how the event impacted prejudice and change agent self-efficacy. Results indicate that the team-based sport environment and social opportunities were instrumental in prejudice reduction while the educational platform was important for increasing change agent self-efficacy.

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Ketra Armstrong, George B. Cunningham, Timothy D. DeSchriver, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Aubrey Kent, Dan Mason, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Ketra Armstrong, George B. Cunningham, Jess C. Dixon, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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Ketra Armstrong, George B. Cunningham, Timothy D. DeSchriver, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Dan Mason, Aubrey Kent, and Anita Moorman

Edited by Carol A. Barr

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George B. Cunningham, Na Young Ahn, Arden J. Anderson, and Marlene A. Dixon

Women are underrepresented in coaching positions, both at the assistant and head coach levels. The purpose of this study was to examine one reason for this occurrence: gender differences in occupational turnover. The authors provided a review of the literature related to occupational turnover, integrating coaching and organizational psychology literatures. Based on these frameworks, the authors then conducted a meta-analysis of the quantitative research in the area, statistically aggregating results from 10 samples and 2,802 coaches. Results indicated that women intend to leave coaching sooner than do men (d = .38). Drawing from the review, the authors then examined potential reasons for the differences. Contrary to expectations, women were younger (d = −.56) and had shorter occupational tenures (d = −.59) than men, suggesting that other factors, such as their aspirations for advancement or the macro-level barriers they encounter, make coaching an unattractive option. Women had lower aspirations for advancement in the profession (d = −.74) and less positive experiences in coaching (d = −.23), though organizational experiences did not vary by gender. The results collectively suggest that occupational constraints can limit women’s aspirations and intentions to remain in coaching, even beyond what would be expected based on their age and time in the profession.