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  • Author: Andressa da Silva x
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Andressa Crystine da Silva Sobrinho, Mariana Luciano de Almeida, Vagner Ramon Rodrigues Silva, Guilherme da Silva Rodrigues, Karine Pereira Rodrigues, Camila de Paula Monteiro, and Carlos Roberto Bueno Júnior

The relationship between the quality of movement, considering different global and universal basic patterns of movement and cognition domains in older adults remain unclear. The current study explored this association in physically inactive older women. In total, 187 participants, aged 60–70 years (mean = 64.9, SD = 6.9 years), were recruited from a physical education program in a public university. The older adults performed the following tests: Functional Movement Screen, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and Modified Baecke Questionnaire for the Older Adults. The regression analysis showed an association between age (β = −0.11, 95% confidence interval, CI, [−0.10, 0.30], p = .03); visuospatial abilities (β = 0.36, 95% CI [0.24, 1.23], p < .001); language (β = 0.23, 95% CI [0.20, 1.08], p < .001); and orientation domains (β = 0.13, 95% CI [0.11, 1.22], p = .016) of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Functional Movement Screen. The quality of movement was related to both age and cognitive performance, such as the visuospatial abilities, language, and orientation domains, in physically inactive older women.

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Sofia Wolker Manta, Kelly Samara da Silva, Giovani Firpo Del Duca, Luís Eduardo A. Malheiros, Margarethe Thaisi Garro Knebel, Andressa Ferreira da Silva, and Thiago Sousa Matias

Background: Income is an important determinant of physical activity (PA) when analyzed in its different domains. Sociodemographic characteristics such as sex, age, education, and marital status reveal distinct population profiles when PA domains are analyzed in isolation. This study aimed to describe clusters of PA in domains within income inequalities and to investigate the associated sociodemographic characteristics of Brazilian adults. Methods: A secondary analysis of the National Health Survey was performed (N = 50,176). PA, sociodemographic characteristics, and family income were investigated. Low- (n = 9504) and high-income adults (n = 6330) were analyzed. Two-step cluster and Rao–Scott chi-square tests were employed. Results: High-income adults accumulated 1.06 times more PA in leisure time compared with low-income adults. Of the 3 clusters observed, the inactive cluster was more prevalent (low-income group: 65.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 64.1–67.5; high-income group: 84.5%; 95% CI, 82.9–86.0). Work/leisure activities (21.2%; 95% CI, 19.8–22.8) and commuting/household activities (12.9%; 95% CI, 11.8–14.1) characterized low-income adults. Work/household activities (10.9%; 95% CI, 9.6–12.3) and commuting/leisure activities (4.6%, 95% CI, 3.9–5.4) characterized high-income adults. Sex (P < .001), age (P < .001), and marital status (P = .0023) were associated with low-income clusters. Conclusion: PA clustering differs within income inequalities. PA in leisure differentiates the opportunities in low- and high-income groups, but it is representative of a very small portion of the wealth.

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Diego de Alcantara Borba, Eduardo da Silva Alves, João Paulo Pereira Rosa, Lucas Alves Facundo, Carlos Magno Amaral Costa, Aldo Coelho Silva, Fernanda Veruska Narciso, Andressa Silva, and Marco Túlio de Mello

Background: Physical exercise plays an important role in metabolic health, especially in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) system. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of a single endurance and resistance exercise session on IGF-1 serum. Methods: The systematic review was performed in SPORTDiscus, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases. All analyses are based on random-effect models. The study identified 249 records of which 21 were included. Results: There was an effect of endurance exercise on total IGF-1 (P = .01), but not for free IGF-1 (P = .36). Resistance exercise similarly only affected total IGF-1 (P = .003) and not free IGF-1 (P = .37). The effect size indicated that total IGF-1 is more affected (ES = 0.81) by endurance than by resistance exercise (ES = 0.46). The present study showed that IGF-1 serum concentrations are altered by exercise type, but in conditions which are not well-defined. Conclusions: The systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that there is no determinant in serum IGF-1 changes for the exercise load characteristic. Therefore, physical exercise may be an alternative treatment to control changes in IGF-1 metabolism and blood concentration.

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Gerson Daniel de Oliveira Calado, Andressa de Oliveira Araújo, Gledson Tavares Amorim Oliveira, Jeffer Eidi Sasaki, Amanda L. Rebar, Daniel Gomes da Silva Machado, and Hassan Mohamed Elsangedy

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships of implicit associations and explicit evaluations with affective responses during an aerobic exercise session, physical activity, and sedentary behavior in adults. Fifty adults (70% women; median age = 31 years; 25th, 75th percentiles: 24.50, 40.50 years old; body mass index = 25.29 ± 4.97 kg/m2) not engaged in regular physical activity completed an implicit association test and a questionnaire of explicit evaluations and wore an accelerometer for 7 days. After the 7-day period, the participants performed 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Every 5 min, the affective response and the perception of effort were recorded. Participants who had more positive implicit associations toward physical activity (vs. sedentary behavior) reported higher affective responses during exercise and engaged in more moderate to vigorous physical activity. Encouraging pleasant physical activity may act to partially improve future physical activity through automatic motivational processes.