Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Author: Bruno V.C. Silva x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Marcus V.V. Lopes, Bruno G.G. da Costa, Luis E.A. Malheiros, Rafael M. Costa, Ana C.C. Souza, Inacio Crochemore-Silva, and Kelly S. Silva

This study (a) compared accelerometer wear time and compliance between distinct wrist-worn accelerometer data collection plans, (b) analyzed participants’ perception of using accelerometers, and (c) identified sociodemographic and behavioral correlates of accelerometer compliance. A sample of high school students (n = 143) wore accelerometers attached to the wrist by a disposable polyvinyl chloride (PVC) wristband or a reusable fabric wristband for 24 hr over 6 days. Those who wore the reusable fabric band, but not their peers, were instructed to remove the device during water-based activities. Participants answered a questionnaire about sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics and reported their experience wearing the accelerometer. We computed non-wear time and checked participants’ compliance with wear-time criteria (i.e., at least three valid weekdays and one valid weekend day) considering two valid day definitions separately (i.e., at least 16 and 23 hours of accelerometer data). Participants who wore a disposable band had greater compliance compared with those who wore a reusable band for both 16-hr (93% vs. 76%, respectively) and 23-hr valid day definitions (91% vs. 50%, respectively). High schoolers with the following characteristics were less likely to comply with wear time criteria if they (a) engaged in labor-intensive activities, (b) perceived that wearing the monitor hindered their daily activities, or (c) felt ashamed while wearing the accelerometer. In conclusion, the data collection plan composed of using disposable wristbands and not removing the monitor resulted in greater 24-hr accelerometer wear time and compliance. However, a negative experience in using the accelerometer may be a barrier to high schoolers’ adherence to rigorous protocols.

Restricted access

Yuri A. Freire, Carlos A. Silva, Geovani A. D. Macêdo, Rodrigo A. V. Browne, Bruno M. de Oliveira, George Felipe C. Martins, Luiz F. Farias-Junior, Luciana C. Brito, and Eduardo C. Costa

We carried out three types of 2-hr experimental sessions with middle-aged and older adults with Type 2 diabetes in order to examine the acute effect of interrupting prolonged sitting with varying periods of standing on postprandial glycemia and blood pressure (BP): (a) prolonged sitting after breakfast; (b) standing for 10 min, 30 min after breakfast; and (c) standing for 20 min, 30 min after breakfast. Glucose and BP were assessed before and after breakfast. A generalized linear model revealed no significant differences for the incremental area under the curve of glucose between standing for 10 min, 30 min after breakfast, versus prolonged sitting after breakfast (β = –4.5 mg/dl/2 hr, 95% CI [–17.3, 8.4]) and standing for 20 min, 30 min after breakfast, versus prolonged sitting after breakfast (β = 0.9 mg/dl/2 hr, 95% CI [–11.9, 13.7]). There was no difference in area under the curve of systolic and diastolic BP among the sessions. Interrupting prolonged sitting time with 10 or 20 min of standing 30 min after breakfast does not attenuate postprandial glycemia or BP in middle-aged and older adults with Type 2 diabetes.