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Claudine Sherrill

The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of creativity as a goal of adapted physical education, to describe assessment techniques, and to suggest instructional approaches for developing creativity in the movement setting. Creative behaviors that can be developed in handicapped children and youth include fluency, flexibility, originality, elaboration, risk-taking, courage, curiosity, and imagination. Research on creativity and handicapped children is identified and cited. Assessment instruments reviewed are Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, Wyrick Test of Motor Creativity, Torrance Test of Thinking Creatively in Action and Movement, TWU Motor Creativity Rating Scale, and Brennan Test of Creative Motor Performance. Instructional approaches described are dance and movement education, games analysis intervention, and shared decision-making versus teacher decision-making. Also discussed are modeling and the influence of specific teaching behaviors on handicapped children’s classroom responses.

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Edited by Claudine Sherrill

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Claudine Sherrill

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Edited by Claudine Sherrill

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Claudine Sherrill

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Claudine Sherrill

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Claudine Sherrill

This paper presents an alternative rationale, other than compliance with PL 94-142, for implementing the integration of handicapped and nonhandicapped students in physical education. Support for integration is related to Lawrence Kohlberg’s (1971, 1984) stages of moral development. Integration is discussed in terms of the three major philosophical positions (pragmatism, idealism, and realism) as described by Davis (1963), Van Dalen (1975), and Webster (1965). Support for integration, although for different reasons and to different degrees, can be found in each philosophy. The paper illustrates an exercise in the clarification of values that can be replicated by readers.

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Lupe Castañ and Claudine Sherrill

The purpose was to analyze the social construction of Challenger baseball opportunities in a selected community. Participants were 10 boys and 6 girls with mental and/or physical disabilities (ages 7 to 16 years, M = 11.31), their families, and the head coach. Data were collected through interviews in the homes with all family members, participant observation at practices and games, and field notes. The research design was qualitative, and critical theory guided interpretation. Analytical induction revealed five outcomes that were particularly meaningful as families and coach socially constructed Challenger baseball: (a) fun and enjoyment, (b) positive affect related to equal opportunity and feelings of “normalcy,” (c) social networking/emotional support for families, (d) baseball knowledge and skills, and (e) social interactions with peers.

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Claudine Sherrill and Thomas Montelione

The purpose of this study was to develop and field test an instrument to assist in prioritizing adapted physical education goals. Nine goals were identified, and the paired-comparison technique was selected to examine beliefs concerning the relative importance of each goal. Data were collected from three samples representative of individuals who teach physical education to handicapped students and/or train others to do so. Findings indicated that the goal ranked as most important by each sample was not significantly different from those ranked as second and third in importance. Adapted physical educators consider many goals to be of equal importance. In general, motor skills, fitness, self-concept, and perceptual motor function/sensory integration are held in high esteem whereas creative expression is considered least important. Other goals are assigned intermediate importance. The Goals of Adapted Physical Education Scale (GAPES) is a valid and reliable instrument that offers promise for the further study of adapted physical education goals.

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Claudine Sherrill and Wanda Rainbolt

Self-actualization profiles were plotted for 265 college-age able-bodied male athletes and 30 elite cerebral palsied male athletes, M age = 24.9, all of whom were international competitors. These profiles were examined in relation to one another and in relation to two normative groups, one consisting of adults and one consisting of college students. Results indicated that college-age able-bodied male athletes and elite cerebral palsied male athletes have similar self-actualization profiles. Elite cerebral palsied male athletes were found to be significantly less self-actualized than normal adults in the areas of time competence, existentiality, self-acceptance, nature of man, and synergy (Shostrom, 1964). Able-bodied college-age male athletes were generally more self-actualized than members of their age-appropriate reference group (i.e., male college students). Implications for sport psychology and counseling are discussed.