Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author: Ian Rice x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Exploring the Influence of Wheelchair-User Interface and Personal Characteristics on Ischial Tuberosity Peak Pressure Index and Gradient in Elite Wheelchair Basketball Players

Joseph Peters, Ian Rice, and Tyson Bull

This pilot study investigated the relationship between personal and wheelchair factors on skin pressures at the ischial tuberosity in wheelchair basketball players. Seventeen wheelchair basketball players (7 male and 10 female) were evaluated during static and dynamic propulsive conditions while peak pressure index and peak pressure gradient were recorded with an interface pressure mat. The results showed that greater seat dump angles and backrest heights were negatively associated with the peak pressure index. Therapeutic cushion use was moderately associated with a reduced peak pressure gradient. Higher-class players used chair configurations associated with augmented pressure; however, classification status alone was not associated with pressure magnitude. Body mass index was negatively correlated with the static peak pressure gradient at levels approaching significance (p < .10). In conclusion, greater seat dump angles and backrest heights may provide pressure relief, whereas greater body mass index and therapeutic cushion use may reduce pressure gradients.

Restricted access

Comparison Between Overground and Dynamometer Manual Wheelchair Propulsion

Alicia M. Koontz, Lynn A. Worobey, Ian M. Rice, Jennifer L. Collinger, and Michael L. Boninger

Laboratory-based simulators afford many advantages for studying physiology and biomechanics; however, they may not perfectly mimic wheelchair propulsion over natural surfaces. The goal of this study was to compare kinetic and temporal parameters between propulsion overground on a tile surface and on a dynamometer. Twenty-four experienced manual wheelchair users propelled at a self-selected speed on smooth, level tile and a dynamometer while kinetic data were collected using an instrumented wheel. A Pearson correlation test was used to examine the relationship between propulsion variables obtained on the dynamometer and the overground condition. Ensemble resultant force and moment curves were compared using cross-correlation and qualitative analysis of curve shape. User biomechanics were correlated (R ranging from 0.41 to 0.83) between surfaces. Overall, findings suggest that although the dynamometer does not perfectly emulate overground propulsion, wheelchair users were consistent with the direction and amount of force applied, the time peak force was reached, push angle, and their stroke frequency between conditions.

Restricted access

Perceptions of High-Intensity Interval Training Among People With Spinal Cord Injury: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

Joseph Peters, Kellie Halloran, Alexander Teague, Emily Erlenbach, Libak Abou, Mariana Kersh, and Ian Rice

This mixed-method project investigated how people with spinal cord injury perceive high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Using a recumbent hand cycle, 11 active men and 9 active women with spinal cord injury or related disease participated in a single HIIT and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) session. Following exercise, participants completed surveys assessing enjoyment, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations. Ten participants were randomly selected to participate in a semistructured interview to assess perceptions toward HIIT. Quantitative survey data revealed that participants trended toward enjoying HIIT over MICT (p = .06) with similar levels of self-efficacy and outcome expectations toward HIIT and MICT (p > .05). Qualitative data revealed that participants believed HIIT would enhance long-term physical and self-evaluative outcomes; several barriers emerged that could prevent widespread adoption among the general population with spinal cord injury. Results support HIIT as a viable exercise option, although research should begin exploring ways to remove HIIT-related barriers that people with spinal cord injury may encounter.