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  • Author: John Bellettiere x
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Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Physical Activity Recommendations: Patterns of Aerobic, Strengthening, and Balance Activities

Mariana Wingood, Levi Bonnell, Andrea Z. LaCroix, Dori Rosenberg, Rod Walker, John Bellettiere, Mikael Anne Greenwood-Hickman, David Wing, and Nancy Gell

Though it is known that most older adults do not meet the recommended physical activity (PA) guidelines, little is known regarding their participation in balance activities or the full guidelines. Therefore, we sought to describe PA patterns among 1,352 community-dwelling older adult participants of the Adult Changes in Thought study, a longitudinal cohort study exploring dementia-related risk factors. We used a modified version of the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire to explore PA performed and classify participants as meeting or not meeting the full guidelines or any component of the guidelines. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with meeting PA guidelines. Despite performing 10 hr of weekly PA, only 11% of participants met the full guidelines. Older age, greater body mass index, needing assistance with instrumental daily activities, and heart disease were associated with decreased odds of meeting PA guidelines. These results can guide interventions that address PA among older adults.

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Associations of Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time With All-Cause Mortality by Genetic Predisposition for Longevity

Alexander Ivan B. Posis, John Bellettiere, Rany M. Salem, Michael J. LaMonte, JoAnn E. Manson, Ramon Casanova, Andrea Z. LaCroix, and Aladdin H. Shadyab

The goal of this study was to examine associations between accelerometer-measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) with mortality by a genetic risk score (GRS) for longevity. Among 5,446 women, (mean [SD]: age, 78.2 [6.6] years), 1,022 deaths were observed during 33,350 person-years of follow-up. Using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, higher light PA and moderate to vigorous PA were associated with lower mortality across all GRS for longevity categories (low/medium/high; all p trend < .001). Higher ST was associated with higher mortality (p trend across all GRS categories < .001). Interaction tests for PA and ST with the GRS were not statistically significant. Findings support the importance of higher PA and lower ST for reducing mortality risk in older women, regardless of genetic predisposition for longevity.

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Associations Between Perceived Neighborhood Walkability and Device-Based Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns in Older Adults

Mikael Anne Greenwood-Hickman, Rod Walker, John Bellettiere, Andrea Z. LaCroix, Boeun Kim, David Wing, KatieRose Richmire, Paul K. Crane, Eric B. Larson, and Dori E. Rosenberg

Neighborhood walkability has been associated with self-reported sedentary behavior (SB) and self-reported and objective physical activity. However, self-reported measures of SB are inaccurate and can lead to biased estimates, and few studies have examined how associations differ by gender and age. The authors examined the relationships between perceived neighborhood walkability measured with the Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Scale (scored 1.0–4.0) and device-based SB and physical activity in a cohort of community-dwelling older adults (N = 1,077). The authors fit linear regression models adjusting for device wear time, demographics, self-rated health, and accounting for probability of participation. The Higher Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Scale was associated with higher steps (+676 steps/point on the Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Scale, p = .001) and sit-to-stand transitions (+2.4 transitions/point, p = .018). Though not statistically significant, stratified analyses suggest an attenuation of effect for those aged 85 years and older and for women. Consistent with previous literature, neighborhood walkability was associated with more steps, though not with physical activity time. The neighborhood environment may also influence SB.

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Accelerometer-Measured Daily Steps, Physical Function, and Subsequent Fall Risk in Older Women: The Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Women Study

Benjamin T. Schumacher, John Bellettiere, Michael J. LaMonte, Kelly R. Evenson, Chongzhi Di, I-Min Lee, David A. Sleet, Charles B. Eaton, Cora E. Lewis, Karen L. Margolis, Lesley F. Tinker, and Andrea Z. LaCroix

Steps per day were measured by accelerometer for 7 days among 5,545 women aged 63–97 years between 2012 and 2014. Incident falls were ascertained from daily fall calendars for 13 months. Median steps per day were 3,216. There were 5,473 falls recorded over 61,564 fall calendar-months. The adjusted incidence rate ratio comparing women in the highest versus lowest step quartiles was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [0.54, 0.95]; p trend across quartiles = .01). After further adjustment for physical function using the Short Physical Performance Battery, the incidence rate ratio was 0.86 ([0.64, 1.16]; p trend = .27). Mediation analysis estimated that 63.7% of the association may be mediated by physical function (p = .03). In conclusion, higher steps per day were related to lower incident falls primarily through their beneficial association with physical functioning. Interventions that improve physical function, including those that involve stepping, could reduce falls in older adults.