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  • Author: Oleg A. Sinelnikov x
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Students’ Autobiographical Memory of Participation in Multiple Sport Education Seasons

Oleg A. Sinelnikov and Peter A. Hastie

This study examines the recollections of the Sport Education experiences of a cohort of students (15 boys and 19 girls) who had participated in seasons of basketball, soccer and badminton across grades six through eight (average age at data collection = 15.6 years). Using autobiographic memory theory techniques, the students completed surveys and interviews that asked them to recall what they remembered about the Sport Education seasons in which they had participated. Student responses were mostly from the “general” and more precise “event specific” levels of recall, and their strongest and most detailed memories were of those features that provide Sport Education participants with what is termed authentic experiences. For example, Sport Education was considered different from regular physical education in that it was more serious and organized. Further, students claimed they had a deeper understanding of these sports as a result of their participation, and in particular, as a result of their officiating roles. The findings provide evidence that the features of affiliation, authentic competition and perceived learning that students find so attractive, last well beyond initial exposure to the model, and that future delivery of the model should strongly adhere to these basic tenets.

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Jack and Jill Went to Instill: Did the Educative Teacher Performance Assessment Cause Them to Falter?

Deborah S. Baxter and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

Purpose: This study examined and deconstructed socialization experiences relative to the educative teacher performance assessment (edTPA) process of preservice teachers during their physical education (PE) teacher education program and induction year as a PE teacher. Method: Utilizing a multiple case study design, two PE teachers were purposefully selected and investigated from a PE teacher education program requiring a passing score on the edTPA. Interviews and stimulated recall sessions served as data sources. Results: The following themes were identified: (a) initial interactions and impetus for teaching—engaging and fun; (b) instruction in PE teacher education—learning a ton; (c) internship—gauging, I’m stunned; (d) implementation of edTPA—raging, I’m done; and (e) induction—waging has begun. Discussion/Conclusions: Although participants in this study were able to note several positives of the assessment, a majority of the findings corroborate previous research suggesting that edTPA may serve as a subtractive experience for PE preservice teachers.

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PETE Faculty’s Perspectives of edTPA: The Range of Change

Deborah S. Baxter and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the extent of changes taking place within the context, structure, and culture of university physical education teacher education programs facilitating high-stakes educative Teacher Performance Assessment policy. Method: Utilizing a multiple-case study design framed by analytical dualism, eight physical education teacher education faculty from eight different programs who had direct involvement in the high-stakes educative Teacher Performance Assessment process were investigated. Data from semi-structured individual interviews, focus group interviews, and documents were interpretively analyzed. Results: Faculty reacted in three distinct ways to the process of change: prevailers, conceders, or exceeders. The process appeared to be based upon an implementation continuum from isolation to internalization. Discussion/Conclusions: University programs have a responsibility to prepare effective physical education teachers who use the best practices for teaching. It is imperative for physical education teacher education faculty to reflect upon the impetus and impact of changes made to their programs.

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Preservice Teachers’ Assessment Literacy Within Models-Based Practice

Jenna Starck, Oleg A. Sinelnikov, and Kevin Andrew Richards

Purpose: Using the assessment literacy framework, the purpose of this study was to explore preservice teachers understanding and enactment of the message system during an early field experience. Method: Six PTs employed SE seasons totaling 540 min. Seven qualitative data methods were utilized. Data analysis included deductive and inductive analysis using a thematic approach. Trustworthiness included data triangulation, peer debriefing, negative case analysis, and the maintenance of an audit trail. Results: Three main themes derived from the data included: instructional decisions were driven by the SE model and informal assessment; formal assessment was driven by the structure of SE; and high assessment value but low assessment literacy. Discussion/Conclusion: The SE model drove PTs to use formal assessment, but primarily in an evaluative manner. The PTs lacked assessment literacy, felt pressure to follow the model, did not use assessment to inform teaching, and had concerns for future assessment use.

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The Influence of Socialization Factors on Physical Educators’ Conceptions of Assessment and Perceived Quality of Assessment

Jenna R. Starck, K. Andrew R. Richards, Michael A. Lawson, and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

Purpose: Framed by occupational socialization theory, this study examined relationships among teachers’ perceived quality of assessment practices, workplace factors, and their conceptions of assessment. Methods: Ninety in-service physical education teachers from Alabama completed an online survey that attended to perceptions of organizational support, marginalization, valuation toward assessment, assessment quality, and class size. Associations were estimated using ordinary least squares regression. Results: In contrast to our initial hypothesis, no significant relationships were found between perceived assessment quality and perceived organizational support, marginalization, and class size. However, our regression analysis yielded significant results when assessment’s importance for education was the outcome variable. Discussion/Conclusions: The results indicated that teachers’ valuation of assessment included holding students and schools accountable, but was irrelevant to improving education. In addition, marginalization and perceived organizational support impacted teachers’ valuation toward using assessments to improve education. Research on assessment quality may depend first on widespread adoption of physical education teacher education assessment practices.

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A Self-Study of a Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Program Coordinator

Victoria N. Shiver, Kevin Andrew Richards, Oleg A. Sinelnikov, and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

Purpose: The teaching personal and social responsibility model has been incorporated into out of school time programming globally, but there is limited research focused on how practitioners learn to use the model. Guided by occupational socialization theory, the authors used self-study to understand the experiences of a doctoral student as she developed and implemented a teaching personal and social responsibility-based program in an elementary after-school program. Method: Data were collected through reflective journaling and critical friend discussions. Results: Qualitative data analysis resulted in three turning points: (a) a planted seed needs light and rain, (b) an emerging bud with growing roots, and (c) rising in full bloom. High frustration was present at the start, but she grew to fully enjoy and utilize the model. Discussion/Conclusion: Self-study played a role in her ability to continue learning and growing. These findings reinforce the challenging but rewarding process of implementing novel instructional approaches.

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“It’s a Lot Less Hassle and a Lot More Fun”: Factors That Sustain Teachers’ Enthusiasm for and Ability to Deliver Sport Education

Matthew D. Curtner-Smith, Gary D. Kinchin, Peter A. Hastie, Jamie J. Brunsdon, and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

Purposes: (a) To describe how more experienced and expert teachers interpreted and delivered sport education (SE) during their careers and (b) to discover and describe factors within their occupational socialization that sustained the teachers’ enthusiasm for and ability to deliver SE. Method: Participants were nine teachers. Primary data sources were formal interviews. Secondary supporting sources were documents and film. They were analyzed by employing standard interpretive methods. Credibility and trustworthiness were established through a search for discrepant and negative cases and member checking. Findings: At different times in their careers, the teachers delivered SE in one of four ways: watered down, through a cafeteria approach, the full version, and the full+ version. A number of factors from their acculturation, professional socialization, and organizational socialization enabled the teachers to deliver the full+ version or led to them delivering other versions of the model. Conclusions: The findings allow us to make practical suggestions for preservice and inservice teacher education that may help university faculty facilitate the teaching of SE.

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Kounin Revisited: Tentative Postulates for an Expanded Examination of Classroom Ecologies

Peter A. Hastie, Oleg A. Sinelnikov, Sheri J. Brock, Tom L. Sharpe, Kim Eiler, and Claire Mowling