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Trey Burdette, Barry Joyner and Dan Czech

The Multidimensional Model for Sport Leadership (MML) (Chelladurai, 1980) posits that an athlete’s performance and satisfaction are functions of the congruency between the preferred leadership of student-athletes, the required behavior of the coach as dictated by the situation, and the actual behavior of the coach. As such, research in sport should examine how appropriate the model is to today’s athletic culture. Gender, one member characteristic, has been researched considerably, with conflicting results, while race and the amount of playing time have been largely ignored with preferential leadership. The purpose of this study was to classify student-athletes’ race, gender, and playing time by their preferred coaching behaviors. NCAA Division-I student-athletes (n = 140) in baseball, men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s soccer, softball, and men’s and women’s volleyball were surveyed using the Revised Leadership Scale for Sport (RLSS). Using discriminant analysis, the authors attempted to predict the student-athlete gender, race, and playing time by their preferred coaching behavior scores. None of the models were significant, indicating a lack of variance between the classification groups. Future research on the importance of preferred coaching predictors is discussed.

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Meke Mukeshi, Bernard Gutin, William Anderson, Patricia Zybert and Charles Basch

The validity of the Caltrac movement sensor for use with preschool children was assessed. Caltrac-derived values for energy expenditure were compared with those derived via laborious coding of direct observation that involved classification of the child’s videotaped activity every other 5 seconds for an hour in the day-care center or on the playground. Both Caltrac and direct observation values were expressed in kilocalories. The subjects were 20 children with a mean age of 35 months. The correlation coefficient for the total of indoor and outdoor activity was r= .62 (p<.01). The separate correlations for indoor and outdoor activity were r=.56 (p<.05) and r=.48 (p<.05), respectively. However, when the children’s weight, height, age, and sex were factored out of both the Caltrac and direct observation scores, the correlations fell to r= .25 (n.s.), r= .47 (p<.05), and r=.16 (n.s.) for the total, indoor, and outdoor activity, respectively. Thus the Caltrac seemed to record indoor activity (mainly walking) more accurately than it recorded the more varied playground movements, casting doubt on its value as a means of measuring physical activity in children 2-3 years of age.

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Tiego A. Diniz, Fabricio E. Rossi, Clara Suemi da Costa Rosa, Jorge Mota and Ismael F. Freitas-Junior

The objective of this study was to compare moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), minutes per week (min/wk), and fulfillment of the current recommendation (150 min/wk of MVPA) based on different cut-points in postmenopausal women. The sample was composed of 233 postmenopausal women aged 59.8 ± 6.7 years old. MVPA was measured using triaxial accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized to collect in 60-s epochs. Participants were included if using at least 5 days. MVPA min/wk were obtained using Freedson, Troiano, Copeland, and Sasaki cut-points. Box-plot indicated large mean differences between almost all cut-points, except for Freedson and Troiano (9.3 [95% LoA: –5.6; 24.3] min/wk). The proportion of women who achieved 150 min/wk of MVPA was similar between Freedson and Troiano (31% vs. 30%). Sasaki and Copeland cut-points resulted in a greater proportion than other cut-points. We concluded that the cut-points analyzed generated different results in MVPA min/wk and low agreement when using current guidelines for MVPA pattern classification, except for the comparisons between Freedson and Troiano cut-points.

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Gail M. Dummer, Martha E. Ewing, Rochelle V. Habeck and Sara R. Overton

The attributions of 147 athletes with cerebral palsy who participated in the 1985 National Cerebral Palsy/Les Autres Games were investigated following competition relative to their reactions to objectively and subjectively defined success or failure. Attributions were the dependent variable in a 2 × 2 (More-Disabled/Less-Disabled × Win/Loss) MANOVA. Attributions were also analyzed in a 2 × 4 (More-Disabled/Less-Disabled × Satisfied/Dissatisfied, Winner/Loser) MANOVA designed to determine the influence of perceived success or failure upon causal explanations of performance. There were no significant differences in the use of attributions by gender; however, there were differences in the use of attributions across disability classifications. Disabled winners used both internal and external explanations to a greater degree than losers, which was inconsistent with previous literature. Previous results linking persistence in sport to the use of internal and stable attributions were supported. Subjective outcome, defined in terms of satisfaction with performance, was a more powerful explanation of achievement behavior for the disabled athletes in this study than objective outcome. Satisfaction was associated with demonstration of positive qualities such as using the right strategy and ability, with realistic assessment of ability, and with enjoying competition.

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Jason D. Vescovi

The aim of this study was to examine the impact of maximum sprint speed on peak and mean sprint speed during youth female field hockey matches. Two high-level female field hockey teams (U-17, n = 24, and U-21, n = 20) were monitored during a 4-game international test series using global position system technology and tested for maximum sprint speed. Dependent variables were compared using a 3-factor ANOVA (age group, position, and speed classification); effect sizes (Cohen d) and confidence limits were also calculated. Maximum sprint speed was similar between age groups and positions, with faster players having greater speed than slower players (29.3 ± 0.4 vs 27.2 ± 1.1 km/h). Overall, peak match speed in youth female field hockey players reaches approximately 90% of maximum sprint speed. Absolute peak match speed and mean sprint speed during matches were similar among the age groups (except match 1) and positions (except match 2); however, peak match speed was greater for faster players in matches 3 and 4. No differences were observed in the relative proportion for mean sprint speeds for age groups or positions, but slower players consistently displayed similar relative mean sprint speeds by using a greater proportion of their maximum sprint speed.

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David A. Rowe, Charles D. Kemble, Terrance S. Robinson and Matthew T. Mahar

Objective:

To determine the day-to-day variability of older adults’ physical activity, and to evaluate the accuracy of the 10,000-step goal for classifying whether older adults obtain 30 min of MVPA.

Methods:

Ninety-one adults ages over 60 y wore a Yamax pedometer and Actigraph accelerometer for 7 days. Interday reliability was estimated via two-way ANOVA ICCs, and classification accuracy was evaluated via sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curve analysis.

Results:

Interday reliability was high; four of five outcome measures had a reliability of ≥.80 with only 2 days of data. The 10,000-step cut point had high accuracy for identifying days with less than 30 min of MVPA, but poor accuracy for identifying days with more than 30 min of MVPA.

Conclusions:

Day-to-day variability in physical activity is lower in older adults than other age groups. The 10,000-step goal is inadequate for determining whether daily physical activity includes 30 min of MVPA in this population.

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Bob LaRose

The growth of sport psychology has brought many positive advances and claims for achievement, but it has also brought controversy. Debate has beset the profession concerning classification (psychologist or consultant?), role (clinician or educator?), clientele (coach, athlete, or administrator?), ethics (whose purpose is to be served and who is being threatened?), and process (performance enhancement, winning, or personal fulfillment?). In this paper, the educational consultant in higher education is offered as a role model to help reduce the confusion and refocus attention on a more widely applicable role. Most sport psychologists today deal directly with athletes, usually elite athletes. However, as with physical skills, psychological skills require time and effort to fully develop. In order to address this time factor, this paper takes the stance that there is a growing need to train experts in the field to focus their efforts on the coach rather than the athlete. The consulting role, focus, and process suggested here could be of value to interested personnel at all levels of sport, and could provide a means for all participants to realize their fullest potential.

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David Diggin, Ross Anderson and Andrew J. Harrison

Evidence suggests reports describing the reliability of leg-spring (kleg) and joint stiffness (kjoint) measures are contaminated by artifacts originating from digital filtering procedures. In addition, the intraday reliability of kleg and kjoint requires investigation. This study examined the effects of experimental procedures on the inter- and intraday reliability of kleg and kjoint. Thirty-two participants completed 2 trials of single-legged hopping at 1.5, 2.2, and 3.0 Hz at the same time of day across 3 days. On the final test day a fourth experimental bout took place 6 hours before or after participants’ typical testing time. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected throughout. Stiffness was calculated using models of kleg and kjoint. Classifications of measurement agreement were established using thresholds for absolute and relative reliability statistics. Results illustrated that kleg and kankle exhibited strong agreement. In contrast, kknee and khip demonstrated weak-to-moderate consistency. Results suggest limits in kjoint reliability persist despite employment of appropriate filtering procedures. Furthermore, diurnal fluctuations in lower-limb muscle-tendon stiffness exhibit little effect on intraday reliability. The present findings support the existence of kleg as an attractor state during hopping, achieved through fluctuations in kjoint variables. Limits to kjoint reliability appear to represent biological function rather than measurement artifact.

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George Antonogeorgos, Anastasios Papadimitriou, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Kostas N. Priftis and Polyxeni Nikolaidou

Background:

Childhood obesity has become a modern epidemic with escalating rates. The aim of our study was to identify physical activity patterns among Greek schoolchildren and to examine their relationship with obesity.

Methods:

700 adolescents age 10 to 12 years were evaluated through a standardized questionnaire. Several demographic, socioeconomic, and physical activity characteristics were recorded. Physical activity was assessed and adolescents were characterized as active and nonactive. Body height and weight were measured and body mass index was calculated in order to to classify subjects as overweight or obese (IOTF classification). Multiple logistic regression and multivariate techniques (principal components analysis) were performed.

Results:

Eight physical activity patterns were identified, including increased physical activity in weekdays and weekends, sports physical activity, vigorous, moderate, and low physical activity. Increased physical activity on weekends and vigorous physical activity in boys were negatively associated with being overweight or obese (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.48−0.90 and OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.49−0.88, correspondingly) and moderate physical activity was marginally positively associated in girls (OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 0.97−1.69), after adjusting for several confounders.

Conclusions:

Our findings demonstrate the important role of vigorous physical activity in the maintenance of normal weight of adolescents

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Riggs J. Klika and William G. Thorland

The purpose of this study was to identify physiological determinants of sprint (91.4 m) swimming velocity that discriminated between performance levels in male children (n = 12, age = 10.26 ± 1.00) and in young adult (n = 16, age = 19.78 ± 1.61) competitors. Independent variables included stature, arm length, body mass, body density, body fat, muscularity, leg power, and measures taken during swimming, which included arm stroke force, leg kick force, peak oxygen consumption rate, stroke rate, and stroke efficiency. Discriminant analysis revealed that in the children, higher levels of leg-kick force, peak VO2, stroke efficiency, and muscularity were the most potent variables contributing to the classification of the faster swimmers. In the young adults, higher levels of stroke efficiency, body density, and muscularity, served as the significant discriminators of the faster swimmers. When compared across age groups, these results indicated that substantial differences in stroke efficiency and muscularity significantly accounted for higher performance in these children versus young adult sprint swimmers.