Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 675 items for :

  • "identification" x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Áine MacNamara and Dave Collins

The importance of psychological characteristics as positive precursors of talent development is acknowledged in literature. Unfortunately, there has been little consideration of the “darker” side of the human psyche. It may be that an inappropriate emphasis on positive characteristics may limit progress. Negative characteristics may also imply derailment or the potential for problems. A comprehensive evaluation of developing performers should cater for positive dual effect and negative characteristics so that these may be exploited and moderated appropriately. An integrated and dynamic system, with a holistic integration of clinical and sport psychology, is offered as an essential element of development systems.

Restricted access

Tara K. Scanlan, David G. Russell, Larry A. Scanlan, Tatiana J. Klunchoo and Graig M. Chow

Following a thorough review of the current updated Sport Commitment Model, new candidate commitment sources for possible future inclusion in the model are presented. They were derived from data obtained using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method. Three elite New Zealand teams participated: amateur All Black rugby players, amateur Silver Fern netball players, and professional All Black rugby players. An inductive content analysis of these players’ open-ended descriptions of their sources of commitment identified four unique new candidate commitment sources: Desire to Excel, Team Tradition, Elite Team Membership, and Worthy of Team Membership. A detailed definition of each candidate source is included along with example quotes from participants. Using a mixed-methods approach, these candidate sources provide a basis for future investigations to test their viability and generalizability for possible expansion of the Sport Commitment Model.

Restricted access

Andre M. Andrijiw and Craig G. Hyatt

In an attempt to understand the lived experiences of those individuals who grew up within the fan region of one professional hockey team yet chose instead to identify with a nonlocal alternative, the authors interviewed 20 Ontario (Canada) based fans of distant National Hockey League teams. Utilizing Brewer’s (1991, 2003) theory of optimal distinctiveness to examine the stories of participants, it was found that these fans maintained their team allegiances over time because doing so allowed them to achieve feelings of both uniqueness and belongingness. Sport managers can help facilitate feelings of belongingness by utilizing various communication and marketing strategies to better recognize and include their distant fans. Such strategies should ultimately result in the strengthening of the fan-team bond.

Restricted access

Fagner Serrano, Jana Slaght, Martin Sénéchal, Todd Duhamel and Danielle R. Bouchard

Many international agencies recommend using 40% of VO2reserve to individually prescribe moderate aerobic intensity to achieve health benefits. Few studies have evaluated the walking cadence needed to reach that intensity for older adults. A total of 121 apparently healthy adults with an average age of 69 and an average VO2peak of 24.1 ± 6.7 ml/kg/min (women) and 28.9 ± 9.1 ml/kg/min (men) were studied. Walking cadence at moderate intensity was established when participants reached 40% of VO2reserve on an indoor flat surface using a portable metabolic cart. Other clinical variables potentially associated with walking cadence were collected to create a clinical algorithm. Mean walking cadence to reach moderate intensity was 115 ± 10 steps per minute. The best algorithm to predict the walking cadence needed to reach moderate intensity in this sample was 113.6–0.23 (body weight in kg) + 0.21 (self-selected walking cadence in steps per minute).

Restricted access

Mickaël Campo, Diane Mackie, Stéphane Champely, Marie-Françoise Lacassagne, Julien Pellet and Benoit Louvet

team contexts influenced by identification with group memberships of different kinds and at different levels, especially if such identifications are simultaneously active and salient? This is the question considered in the current research. Research on social identity indicates that individuals may

Restricted access

Ben Larkin and Janet S. Fink

Team identification—loosely defined as a psychological connection to a sport team ( Wann, 2006 )—has been covered extensively in sport management literature. For example, a wealth of research has been put into understanding both the outcomes of team identification (e.g.,  Branscombe & Wann, 1992

Restricted access

Wonseok Jang, Yong Jae Ko, Daniel L. Wann and Daehwan Kim

level of team identification, and the amount of energy that spectators gain is expected to determine their levels of happiness. Furthermore, this study proposed that the effect of team identification on spectators’ happiness would be moderated by game outcome (winning vs. losing). Specifically, we

Restricted access

Stephen L. Shapiro, Lynn L. Ridinger and Galen T. Trail

The growth of college sport over the last several years, combined with increased competition for the sport consumer dollar, has created a need to understand spectator consumption behavior. In addition, the impact of a new football program can generate interest that influences future spectator spending decisions. Using identity theory as a framework, the current study examined the differential effects of past sport consumer behaviors on various future sport consumer intentions within the context of a new college football program. Consumption intentions included attendance, sponsor support, and merchandise purchases. Furthermore, this investigation helped to determine how much variance past behaviors would explain in behavioral intentions after controlling for nine points of attachment. Data were collected from spectators of a Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) football program located in the Mid-Atlantic region. The findings suggest past behavior predicted future intentions; however, the amount of variance explained varied dramatically depending on specific past behaviors and points of attachment. These results can help sport marketers develop strategies to capitalize on the interest generated through new athletic programs.

Restricted access

Scott A. Conger, Alexander H.K. Montoye, Olivia Anderson, Danielle E. Boss and Jeremy A. Steeves

previously validated for both exercise identification and repetition counting for each of the five exercises ( Steeves et al., In Press ). Before beginning each exercise, a research assistant demonstrated the exercise at the selected speed with complete range of motion for the participant. Using a self

Restricted access

Yuhei Inoue, Mikihiro Sato, Kevin Filo, James Du and Daniel C. Funk

psychologically engaging in sport events through social identification with teams competing in the events ( Inoue, Funk, Wann, Yoshida, & Nakazawa, 2015 ). The propositions that these two pathways can influence subjective well-being can be theoretically drawn from a body of research demonstrating the meaning