Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "cognitive rest" x
  • Journal of Sport Rehabilitation x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

The Effect of Cognitive Rest as Part of Postconcussion Management for Adolescent Athletes: A Critically Appraised Topic

Rachel S. Johnson, Mia K. Provenzano, Larynn M. Shumaker, Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, and Cailee E. Welch Bacon

Clinical Scenario:

It is hypothesized that cognitive activity following a concussion may potentially hinder patient recovery. While the recommendation of cognitive rest is often maintained and rationalized, a causal relationship between cognitive activity and symptom duration has yet to be established.

Clinical Question:

Does the implementation of cognitive rest as part of the postconcussion management plan reduce the number of days until the concussed adolescent patient is symptom free compared to a postconcussion management plan that does not incorporate cognitive rest?

Summary of Key Findings:

A thorough literature search returned 7 possible studies; 5 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included. Three studies indicated that increased cognitive activity is associated with longer recovery from a concussion, and, therefore, supported the use of cognitive rest. One study indicated that the recommendation for cognitive rest was not significantly associated with time to concussion symptom resolution. One study indicated that strict rest, defined as 5 days of no school, work, or physical activity; might prolong symptom duration.

Clinical Bottom Line:

There is moderate evidence to support the prescription of moderate cognitive rest for concussed patients. Clinicians who intend on implementing cognitive rest in their concussion protocols should be aware of inconsistencies and be open-minded to alternative treatment progressions while taking into consideration each individual patient and maintaining adequate patient-centered care principles.

Strength of Recommendation:

Grade B evidence exists that prescription of moderate cognitive rest for concussed patients may be beneficial as a supplement to physical rest as treatment for symptom reduction in adolescents.

Restricted access

Youth Concussion Management Practices Among Athletic Trainers: A Vignette-Based Survey

Reid Skeel, Anissa Maffett, Abigail Feder, Cayla Mitzkovitz, and Sofia Lesica

with significant symptoms, (2) continued brain recovery in which symptoms abate, and finally (3) full recovery to preclinical neurological baseline. 7 The primary goals of concussion management are to prevent further injury during the vulnerable acute phase, provide physical and cognitive rest for the

Restricted access

More Physical Activity Is Correlated With Reduction in Kinesiophobia for Adolescents With Persistent Symptoms After Concussion

Katherine L. Smulligan, Mathew J. Wingerson, Corrine N. Seehusen, Casey C. Little, Julie C. Wilson, and David R. Howell

reducing kinesiophobia in those with persistent symptoms. During concussion recovery, current recommendations endorse a brief (24–48 h) physical and cognitive rest period followed by a gradual increase in activity below the level of symptom exacerbation. 1 There is a growing body of evidence that early

Open access

Mode and Intensity of Physical Activity During the Postacute Phase of Sport-Related Concussion: A Systematic Review

Barbara Baker, Eric Koch, Kevin Vicari, and Kyle Walenta

and cognitive rest until the symptoms were resolved. 8 – 10 McCrea et al 11 studied 635 concussed collegiate and high school athletes and concluded that a symptom-free waiting period that was used in 60% of their cases did not influence clinical recovery or reduce the risk of another concussion. Yet

Full access

College Athletic Trainers’ Perceptions of Rest and Physical Activity When Managing Athletes With a Sport-Related Concussion

Kyle M. Petit and Tracey Covassin

, respectively. These results suggest some inconsistencies between ATs’ reported clinical practice and current best practices for the management of athletes with an SRC. 1 Similar to physical rest, cognitive rest is recommended during the first 24 to 48 hours after an SRC. 1 , 20 This may include limiting