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Francis Feld

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Michael G. Dolan

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Brian W. Potter

Edited by Malissa Martin

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Lindsey E. Eberman, Stephanie M. Mazerolle, Kelly D. Pagnotta, Kristin A. Applegate, Douglas J. Casa and Carl M. Maresh

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Bradford Strand, Shannon David, Katie J. Lyman and Jay M. Albrecht

The purpose of this original research was to survey high school coaches in four states in the Midwest region of the United States regarding their knowledge of first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) as well as confidence in managing/treating emergency situations. Responses to general knowledge inquiries revealed that coaches were able to accurately answer questions related to return to play, level of consciousness, external bleeding, and cardiac arrest. However, coaches were unable to correctly answer questions specific to rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) and also misidentified information related to pediatric AED use. Because sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death and has been linked to lack of bystander intervention, the results of this project should be considered by coaches and administrators to implement certification and continuing education for high school coaches. Finally, coaches who were certified in first aid, CPR, and AED were more confident in treating an individual who required care compared with coaches not certified. Therefore, individuals who coach at all levels of sport and recreational activities should consider formal training and certification.

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Rebecca M. Hirschhorn, Cassidy Holland, Amy F. Hand and James M. Mensch

outlined in the RDS. Physician responses for each task statement are presented in Tables  2 – 6 by domain. Of the five domains, the injury/illness prevention and wellness protection domains had the highest average score (4.20 ± 0.21) followed by the immediate and emergency care domain (4.16 ± 0.10). The

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Hideyuki E Izumi and Masaaki Tsuruike

/or physical performance. 8. Intervention Employ life-saving techniques through the use of standard emergency care procedures to reduce morbidity and the incidence of mortality. 9. Intervention Use standard accepted procedures for the transport, ambulation, stabilization, and/or immobilization to minimize for

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Paul J. Makhoul, Kathryn E. Sinden, Renée S. MacPhee and Steven L. Fischer

Paramedics represent a unique occupational group where the nature of their work, providing prehospital emergency care, makes workplace modifications to manage and control injury risks difficult. Therefore, the provision of workplace education and training to support safe lifting remains a viable and important approach. There is, however, a lack of evidence describing movement strategies that may be optimal for paramedic work. The purpose of this study was to determine if a strategy leveraging a greater contribution of work from the lower body relative to the torso was associated with lower biomechanical exposures on the spine. Twenty-five active duty paramedics performed 3 simulated lifting activities common to paramedic work. Ground reaction forces and whole body kinematics were recorded to calculate: peak spine moment and angle about the L4/L5 flexion-extension axis as indicators of biomechanical exposure; and, joint work, integrated from net joint power as a measure of technique inclusive of movement dynamics. Paramedics generating more work from the lower body, relative to the trunk, were more likely to experience lower peak L4/L5 spine moments and angles. These data can inform the development of workplace training and education on safe lifting that focuses on paramedics generating more work from the lower body.

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Jeffrey J. Martin

. This is referred to as the disability paradox ( Albrecht & Devlieger, 1999 ). In a study of 233 emergency care workers, 18% reported that they believed they could have a severe SCI and still be happy to be alive, compared with 92% of those with an SCI. In addition, only 17% (vs. 86% of individuals with

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Cynthia J. Wright, Nico G. Silva, Erik E. Swartz and Brent L. Arnold

possible airway obstruction, amongst other pathologies. 1 , 2 In the event of injury, protective equipment (e.g., helmet, shoulder pads) can pose a barrier to effective emergency care. 3 – 5 Thus, due to the risks of the sport and potential for equipment to inhibit care, athletic trainers responsible for