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Employee Wellness and beyond at Appleton Papers Inc.

Craig Halls and John Rhodes

Column-editor : Sue Finkam

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The Healthy DiplomaTM and Healthy Titans: Two Innovative Campus Programs for Progressive Student, Profession, and Community Outcomes

Lisa Hicks and Dan Schmidt

There is a tremendous need for wellness programming at all university levels as well as the United States as a whole. Healthy lifestyles benefit the workplace through lower healthcare costs, lower rates of injury and absenteeism, higher productivity, and improved morale and retention. This paper describes two innovative programs in higher education, the Healthy DiplomaTM and Healthy Titans, which are designed to improve the health and well-being of both students and employees. Two universities addressed the health and wellness of students (Healthy DiplomaTM) and employees (Healthy Titans) by utilizing the strengths of their respective kinesiology department students and faculty members. The Healthy DiplomaTM program was designed to lead university students to a healthy lifestyle while enhancing their postgraduation contributions as healthy entry-level employees. The Healthy Titans program was designed to provide University of Wisconsin Oshkosh employees and their families an affordable fitness program with an onsite clinical setting for kinesiology students to gain practical experience with fitness programming. Students were provided the opportunity to gain personal health and wellness skills and competencies, and practice their future profession in an applied, yet highly-supervised setting. Practitioners were provided current research and best profession practices. These two programs at two different universities further illustrate both the practicality and advantages of faculty and student collaborations for campus-wide wellness. Programs addressing wellness at the university level have demonstrated appropriateness as well as benefits for students, employees, and community members, and suggest expansion of similar programs to other university settings.

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Transformative Sport Service Research: Linking Sport Services With Well-Being

Yuhei Inoue, Mikihiro Sato, and Kevin Filo

organizations to make sustained efforts to improve consumer and employee well-being, an understanding of how those efforts positively affect the organizations’ bottom line and competitive advantage is essential ( Porter & Kramer, 2011 ). Although previous researchers point to the relationship between the

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Digest

Kim Gammage, Jeff Caron, Alyson Crozier, Alison Ede, Matt Hoffman, Christopher Hill, Sean Locke, Desi McEwan, Kathleen Mellano, Eva Pila, Matthew Stork, and Svenja Wolf

behaviors (i.e., compliance with, and participation in, company safety protocols), and perceived organizational support (i.e., the extent to which the organization values employees’ contributions to the company and employee well-being). At the individual level, participants’ perceptions of shared

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Burnout, Help Seeking, and Perceptions of Psychological Safety and Stigma Among National Collegiate Athletic Association Coaches

Julie M. Slowiak, Rebecca R. Osborne, Jordyn Thomas, and Adna Haasan

allow coaching staff and athletes to focus their efforts on sport-specific goals and personal development (e.g.,  Fan et al., 2020 ), learning behavior ( Edmondson, 1999 ), and maintaining their health (e.g.,  Schinke et al., 2018 ). In addition, research on employee well-being within collegiate

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A Constant Balancing Act: Delivering Sustainable University Instructional Physical Activity Programs

Sheri J. Brock, Christina Beaudoin, Mark G. Urtel, Lisa L. Hicks, and Jared A. Russell

and deliver an employee wellness program. Based on the American College of Health  Standards of Practice for Health Promotion in Higher Education ( 2019 ), UIndy’s coordinated worksite wellness campus initiative engages faculty, staff, students, and community partners in the provision of a campus

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“If This Is What Working in Sports Is, I Want Absolutely No Part of It”: Women’s Experiences With Sexual Harassment in Sport Organizations

Elizabeth Taylor, Katherine Sveinson, and Laura Burton

behaviors and the organization’s responsibility for the overall organizational culture, employee well-being, and intent of women to leave the industry prematurely. Research from outside the sport industry has illustrated that gendered work conditions (e.g., gender discrimination, SH, and sexism) can have an

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Preservice Teachers’ Mindfulness and Attitudes Toward Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction

Chunxiao Li, Ngai Kiu Wong, Raymond K.W. Sum, and Chung Wah Yu

- regulation . New York, NY : Springer . doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-2263-5_7 Schultz , P.P. , Ryan , R.M. , Niemiec , C.P. , Legate , N. , & Williams , G.C. ( 2015 ). Mindfulness, work climate, and psychological need satisfaction in employee well-being . Mindfulness, 6 , 971 – 985 . doi:10.1007/s

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Finding a Healthy Balance: Managerial Considerations Regarding the Work–Life Interface of Interns and Graduate Assistants Working in Collegiate Sport

Jeffrey Graham, Allison Smith, and Sylvia Trendafilova

, perceived control, and employee well-being . Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 11 ( 1 ), 100 – 118 . doi: 10.1037/1076-8998.10.4.100 10.1037/1076-8998.10.4.100 Yuile , C. , Chang , A. , Gudmundsson , A. , & Sawang , S. ( 2012 ). The role of life friendly policies on employees’ work

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Developing Student-Athlete School Satisfaction and Psychological Well-Being: The Effects of Academic Psychological Capital and Engagement

Minjung Kim, Brent D. Oja, Han Soo Kim, and Ji-Hyoung Chin

consequences of positive organizational behavior: The role of psychological capital for promoting employee well-being in sport organizations . Sport Management Review, 22 ( 1 ), 108 – 125 . doi:10.1016/j.smr.2018.04.003 10.1016/j.smr.2018.04.003 Kim , M. , Kim , Y.D. , & Lee , H.W. ( 2020 ). It is