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Lisa Hicks and Dan Schmidt

There is a tremendous need for wellness programming at all university levels as well as the United States as a whole. Healthy lifestyles benefit the workplace through lower healthcare costs, lower rates of injury and absenteeism, higher productivity, and improved morale and retention. This paper describes two innovative programs in higher education, the Healthy DiplomaTM and Healthy Titans, which are designed to improve the health and well-being of both students and employees. Two universities addressed the health and wellness of students (Healthy DiplomaTM) and employees (Healthy Titans) by utilizing the strengths of their respective kinesiology department students and faculty members. The Healthy DiplomaTM program was designed to lead university students to a healthy lifestyle while enhancing their postgraduation contributions as healthy entry-level employees. The Healthy Titans program was designed to provide University of Wisconsin Oshkosh employees and their families an affordable fitness program with an onsite clinical setting for kinesiology students to gain practical experience with fitness programming. Students were provided the opportunity to gain personal health and wellness skills and competencies, and practice their future profession in an applied, yet highly-supervised setting. Practitioners were provided current research and best profession practices. These two programs at two different universities further illustrate both the practicality and advantages of faculty and student collaborations for campus-wide wellness. Programs addressing wellness at the university level have demonstrated appropriateness as well as benefits for students, employees, and community members, and suggest expansion of similar programs to other university settings.

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Yuhei Inoue, Mikihiro Sato, and Kevin Filo

organizations to make sustained efforts to improve consumer and employee well-being, an understanding of how those efforts positively affect the organizations’ bottom line and competitive advantage is essential ( Porter & Kramer, 2011 ). Although previous researchers point to the relationship between the

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Kim Gammage, Jeff Caron, Alyson Crozier, Alison Ede, Matt Hoffman, Christopher Hill, Sean Locke, Desi McEwan, Kathleen Mellano, Eva Pila, Matthew Stork, and Svenja Wolf

behaviors (i.e., compliance with, and participation in, company safety protocols), and perceived organizational support (i.e., the extent to which the organization values employees’ contributions to the company and employee well-being). At the individual level, participants’ perceptions of shared

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Sheri J. Brock, Christina Beaudoin, Mark G. Urtel, Lisa L. Hicks, and Jared A. Russell

and deliver an employee wellness program. Based on the American College of Health  Standards of Practice for Health Promotion in Higher Education ( 2019 ), UIndy’s coordinated worksite wellness campus initiative engages faculty, staff, students, and community partners in the provision of a campus

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Minjung Kim, Brent D. Oja, Han Soo Kim, and Ji-Hyoung Chin

consequences of positive organizational behavior: The role of psychological capital for promoting employee well-being in sport organizations . Sport Management Review, 22 ( 1 ), 108 – 125 . doi:10.1016/j.smr.2018.04.003 10.1016/j.smr.2018.04.003 Kim , M. , Kim , Y.D. , & Lee , H.W. ( 2020 ). It is

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Elizabeth A. Taylor, Matt R. Huml, and Marlene A. Dixon

these constructs, this study also contributes to theoretical advancements in the broader areas of work–life studies and employee well-being in sport. It also provides practical guidance for sport managers in understanding the factors that impact the work–life interface and well-being. In developing the

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Matt R. Huml, Elizabeth A. Taylor, and Eric M. Martin

 al., 2021 ). These challenges have created an environment where college athletics is less willing to embrace many of the adaptive workstyle options offered in other vocational outlets as a benefit to employee well-being and productivity ( Moen, 2018 ). Although the sport industry has been resistant to

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Patrick Gaudreau and Benjamin J.I. Schellenberg

measured using four items similar to the ones of Greenbaum et al. ( 2012 ). Each item was preceded with the stem: “In my opinion, to be highly successful, a professional coach should . . . .” For example, the item “care more about profits than employeeswell-being” was modified to “care more about winning

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Kim Tolentino, Tucker Readdy, and Johannes Raabe

different staff members to assess organizational culture and climate in an effort to maintain reasonable job expectations and promote employee well-being. For example, based on such evaluations, specific resources for changing employee demographics (i.e., increasing numbers of female, ethnic, and sexual

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Shannon C. Mulhearn, Pamela Hodges Kulinna, and Collin Webster

.6%). Gaining support from the school administration for implementing employee wellness initiatives received a low endorsement, as well (47.1%). Perhaps more surprising is the low rating given for items on the survey regarding using politicizing skills with the district and/or local government officials to