Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • "gaze anchoring" x
  • Athletic Training, Therapy, and Rehabilitation x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Miya K. Rand and George E. Stelmach

This study examined how aging compromises coordinative eye-hand movements with multiple segments. Older adults and young controls performed two-segment movements with the eyes only or with the eyes and hand together. The results showed minimal age-related changes on the initiation and execution of primary saccade during the first segment. However, the older adults showed a scaling problem of saccade velocity when hand movements were included. They were also slow in stabilizing gaze fixation to the first target. Regarding hand movements, the older adults pronouncedly increased the deceleration phase compared with the controls while fixating their gazes to the target. They also increased the intersegment interval for both eye and hand movements. Taken together, aging differentially affects various components of movements, which contributes to the slowness of overall performance.

Restricted access

Melvyn Roerdink, Paulina J. M. Bank, C. (Lieke) E. Peper, and Peter J. Beek

Rhythmic limb movements are often anchored at particular points in the movement cycle. Anchoring may reveal essential task-specific information for motor control. We examined the effect of tracking mode (in-phase, antiphase) and gaze direction (left, right) on anchoring in visuomotor tracking with and without concurrent visual feedback of the hand movement. For in-phase tracking, anchoring was observed at the foveated reversal point whereas for antiphase tracking anchoring was observed at both reversals, suggesting the presence of two reference points instead of one. Anchoring at the foveated reversal reflected gaze anchoring (i.e., coalignment of hand and gaze) while anchoring at the nonfoveated reversal reflected visuomotor synchronization (i.e., the hand was steered to the nonfoveated reversal coincident with a target reversal at the point of gaze). We propose that the number and location of anchor points play a crucial role in the underlying control by providing reference values for error correction processes.

Full access

Mark Hollands, Fuengfa Khobkhun, Amornpan Ajjimaporn, Rebecca Robins, and Jim Richards

maintenance of balance during the potentially destabilizing postural reorganization at the onset of the turning movement. Gaze anchoring on salient environmental features via combined head rotations and saccadic eye movements is likely similar to the alternating saccade and fixation strategy employed during