Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • "higher education administration" x
  • Social Studies in Sport and Physical Activity x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Edward Hebert

Faculty morale plays an important role in academic life. Morale influences faculty behavior, productivity, and quality of teaching; ultimately affects student learning and program quality; and is predictive of faculty turnover. It is an often overlooked but worthy challenge for academic leaders. This article examines faculty morale, its meaning, and factors that influence it and explores strategies for promoting it in a university department. Faculty morale is a cognitive, emotional, and motivational approach toward the work of the department and may be reflected by a sense of common purpose, group cohesion, and a sense of personal value in the organization. Research shows that faculty morale is affected by various aspects of work life including workload, supportive resources, and recognition. However, evidence also suggests that 2 of the strongest variables influencing morale are relationships with colleagues and perceptions of the abilities and actions of the department leader. Strategies are suggested for promoting faculty morale that are derived from the research, a survey of department chairs, and experience.

Restricted access

Lynda B. Ransdell, Sarah Toevs, Jennifer White, Shelley Lucas, Jean L. Perry, Onie Grosshans, Diane Boothe, and Sona Andrews

In higher education in the United States, women are often underrepresented in leadership positions. When women try administration, they face a higher rate of attrition than their male counterparts. Given the lack of women in leadership positions and the failure of the academy to retain women administrators, a group of women administrators and faculty with many collective years of experience in higher education assembled to write this paper. Our writing group consisted of 2 Chairs, 2 Deans, 1 Associate Dean, 2 pre-tenure faculty members, and a Provost, representing four different institutions. The authors of this paper suggest that applying the proposed model of transformational leadership within the field of Kinesiology may have a two-fold benefit. It may increase the number of women in administrative positions and it may extend how long women choose to serve in an administrative capacity. Components of the model include developing personal and professional characteristics that motivate faculty to perform beyond expectations, and understanding gender-related and kinesiology-specific challenges of administration. In addition, recommendations are made for pursuing careers in administration, and for pursuing future research projects. We hope that through this paper, we have started an important and open discussion about women in leadership roles, and ultimately, encouraged some prospective leaders to consider a career in higher education administration.

Open access

Bradley J. Cardinal

Athletic Training Clinician-Researcher” 2019 Duane V. Knudson Number 588 “Confronting the ‘Consensus of Uninformed Dogma’ in Higher Education Administration” 2019 Murray G. Phillips Int’l, Australia “Empowering Communities: History Making in the 21st Century” 2020 Shawn M. Arent Number 589 “From the Lab to

Restricted access

Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo, and Damon P.S. Andrew

literature on mentoring in higher education administration is not as extensive as in business, it supports the value of having a mentor for career development ( Jones, Harris, & Miles, 2009 ; Sambunjak, Straus, & Marusic, 2010 ; Sands, Parson, & Duane, 1991 ). Several authors support ongoing mentoring